Seeking Stats on Classical Guitar Instruction

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Godlovitch
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Seeking Stats on Classical Guitar Instruction

Post by Godlovitch » Sat May 20, 2017 2:46 pm

I would appreciate references to any sources of reliable information about topics such as these:

(a) The number of students at any one time taking classical guitar lessons. This would likely be most accurately understood at a local level.
(b)The range of duration (e.g., in hours of instruction) of classical guitar lessons taken both privately or under the aegis of some conservatory program like RCM or Trinity. Some describe their guitar instruction in terms of Grades earned for some conservatory program. Others will describe their term of lessons in terms of years of instruction with so many hours per month of lessons.
(c) The attrition or drop-out rate for both program-based and private lessons. For just how long do students take lessons? A bar graph would help.
(d) The extent to which those who have had some formal guitar instruction continue to play the instrument once they have stopped taking lessons.
(e) The extent to which those who have stopped taking lessons formally continue to advance in their progress on the instrument through self-study.

I appreciate that it would be difficult to find such information on a large scale - especially (d) and (e). Local guitar societies might keep track of such facts. It will also change with time. My own knowledge is purely personal and anecdotal. My interest was sparked by what seems to be a common phenomenon in many of my generation. As children and teens, some formal music lessons were often taken - and often to a fairly advanced level. Many completed a number of years of Conservatory exams , e.g., of the Royal Conservatory of Music, through lessons given locally by Conservatory certified instructors. Some took lessons with unaffiliated instructors. However, once such young people stopped taking lessons, they seem to have stopped playing for their own pleasure. It was as if this was a stage of life to have endured much like learning Latin or Chemistry after which such activities are simply dropped - and replaced by whatever takes their place.
I'd like especially to know just how common this abandonment rate is. Then there's the question as to why it occurs.
Thanks for any assistance.
Stan

Rasputin
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Re: Seeking Stats on Classical Guitar Instruction

Post by Rasputin » Sat May 20, 2017 3:33 pm

Godlovitch wrote:
Sat May 20, 2017 2:46 pm
However, once such young people stopped taking lessons, they seem to have stopped playing for their own pleasure. It was as if this was a stage of life to have endured much like learning Latin or Chemistry after which such activities are simply dropped - and replaced by whatever takes their place.
I can't help with the stats, unfortunately. I don't think it is safe to assume that if someone drops music it was only ever something to be endured, though.

I know someone who got to Grade 8 piano and stopped, then got to Grade 8 violin and stopped. She will speak wistfully of how much she liked her Grade 8 pieces, as if she can't play them any more. It's a pity that people think the point is to get a certificate or whatever, but it doesn't follow that they weren't enjoying it.

Someone else who had been very serious about piano during her school years told me that it was just frustrating to play now because she couldn't do it like she used to, and work didn't leave her with enough practice time to get back to her previous level.

Both of those people dropped music, but I don't think either of them ever looked at it as something to be endured.

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Seeking Stats on Classical Guitar Instruction

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Sat May 20, 2017 11:07 pm

I think you are unlikely to have much success finding such information. Some such work was done many years ago to do with EGTA (European Guitar Teachers Association) but it would be very out of date now I fear; no harm in getting in touch though with the various branches of EGTA (they are organised nationally in various European countries including UK) to see if they happen to have something useful.
Aside from such as that one would need to track down somebody doing something like a higher degree research paper on the topic, so maybe asking various university departments direct would be a start. Or are you starting such research yourself?
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CathyCate
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Re: Seeking Stats on Classical Guitar Instruction

Post by CathyCate » Sun May 21, 2017 12:12 pm

Sorry I cannot really help on this one beyond suggesting some additional lines of inquiry.

It might be interesting to know how many former students return to the study of CG. Additionally, how many of those "recidivists" seek out a private instructor or a formal class at a music school, college etc. when they do.

It could also be the case that lapsed CG study is occasioned by or for various reasons may correlate to the study of yet another instrument.

Good luck with your inquiry. This could become a very interesting thread.

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