Exercise for right hand A & M fingers

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rajesh_3615
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Exercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by rajesh_3615 » Sun Oct 01, 2017 1:30 pm

Hello everyone I have guiliani right hand studies that I practiced for a while. I am unable to figure out which excercise should I practice for A & M finger infependence. It sounds very thin compared to I & M finger.

Please hlep me

Robin
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Re: Excercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by Robin » Sun Oct 01, 2017 1:53 pm

rajesh_3615 wrote:
Sun Oct 01, 2017 1:30 pm
Hello everyone I have guiliani right hand studies that I practiced for a while. I am unable to figure out which excercise should I practice for A & M finger infependence. It sounds very thin compared to I & M finger.

Please hlep me
This is a common issue, often related to right hand balance and finger independence. You can use any right hand exercises (ie Guiliani, Carlevaro, Boudonis, etc) and even better if you work on a variety of patterns. Initially play on open strings, later add a stationary left hand chord part, adding the left hand chord changes last.

One idea is to take turns accenting each finger of the pattern. If the pattern is P I M A, play P I M A, accenting P for a repeated number of repetitions, until it begins to feel automatic. Then go on, following the same procedure, accenting I, then M, then A. This helps to develop a sense of balance and finger independence. Be aware of your overall wrist and right hand position. Difficulties with specific fingers can indicate a need to make adjustments at this level. Examine your overall sitting position, position of the guitar and take note of tension that you feel throughout your body. Do a mental check-in working through all body parts from head to toe or from toe to head (either way is fine).

Another idea is to place P I M A on the strings needed for the arpeggio exercise. Keeping I, M, A on the strings, pluck only P. Continue through the pattern: keeping P, M, A on the strings, pluck only I; keeping P, I, A on the strings pluck only M and keeping P, I M on the strings pluck only A. This helps develop finger independence.

Wishing you best in your technical development! It is a lot of work but well worth it!

Robin
So much music, so little time.

rajesh_3615
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Re: Excercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by rajesh_3615 » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:01 pm

The last one seems very odd, would you recomend any etude for the A & M workout.

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David Norton
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Re: Excercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by David Norton » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:18 pm

rajesh_3615 wrote:
Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:01 pm
The last one seems very odd, would you recommend any etude for the A & M workout.
Carcassi Study Op. 60 #2:
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Dirck Nagy
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Re: Excercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by Dirck Nagy » Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:39 pm

  • a,m scales.
  • Arpeggio drills such as Ricardo Iznaola's Kitharologus, Exercise 38
  • various rasgueado patterns.
  • there are exercises i call "sweeps" but probably have another name. You strum using 2 fingers moving in opposite directions. (i.e. use extensors on "m" and flexors on "a", vice versa) Difficult to explain, but easy to demonstrate...sorry I don't have a working video camera) Be careful with this one and do not overdo it; you don't want an injury!
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guitarrista
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Re: Excercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by guitarrista » Sun Oct 01, 2017 4:25 pm

rajesh_3615 wrote:
Sun Oct 01, 2017 2:01 pm
The last one seems very odd, would you recomend any etude for the A & M workout.
El Abejorro, by Emilio Pujol - but use pmam pmam... instead of the notated pimi pimi.. pattern. It is a fun etude and you will get quite the workout as well :-)

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rajesh_3615
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Re: Excercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by rajesh_3615 » Sun Oct 01, 2017 6:52 pm

Thank you everyone for supprting me.

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guitareleven
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Re: Excercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by guitareleven » Wed Oct 04, 2017 10:00 pm

Try adapting Villa-Lobos' first etude. Start with the conventional fingering; p-i-p-i-p-m-i-a | -m-a-i-m-p-i-p-i, concentrating on a relaxed control when you get to the m-a bit, Then linger on that part, extended: p-i-p-i-p-m-i-a-m-a | m-a-m-a-i-m-p-i-p-i.. Alternatively, or additionally, transition to m-a sooner in the unmodified arpeggio: p-m-i-a-m-a-m-a } -m-a-m-a-m-a-i-m, etc.

Todd Tipton
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Re: Exercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by Todd Tipton » Mon Oct 30, 2017 8:46 pm

For right hand studies, I have all of my students work from Christopher Berg's Giuliani Revisited. I would have a very bad day if I ever misplaced my own tattered, coffee-stained copy. ;-)

Specifically for the right hand, I practice no.s 40 and 41 with m, and a as well as i, and m. Another good set is no.s 61-64.And also no.s 81-84. And who could ever forget ni.s 97 and 98? ;-) I certainly don't do all of these at the same time. But they are broken up into routines so that: 1. My workout is varied. 2. m and a are often challenged.

I also spend time doing speed bursts, and rhythmic variations. The speed bursts involve play 2 or 3 notes as fast and light as possible. Then 3 or 4 notes. 5 or 6, and so on. They are like little bursts or sprints. A handful of notes, but thought of as a single gesture. I also start at other places in the middle of the pattern. Concerning the rhythmic variations, Stanley Yates explains this well in his CLASSICAL GUITAR TECHNIQUE FROM FOUNDATION TO VIRTUOSITY. As one example, imagine a right hand pattern of 4 sixteenth notes. Good variations from this are as follows:
1. 2 thirty second notes, and two sixteenth notes.
2. 1 sixteenth note, 2 thirty second notes, and 1 sixteenth note.
3. 2 sixteenth notes, and 2 thirty second notes.
4. 1 thirty second note, 2 sixteenth notes, and 1 thirty second note.

If this is new to a student, I strongly suggest that less is more. I wouldn't try to do too much of this at once. Just a couple of minutes of some of this is MORE than enough in the beginning.

Happy practicing! :-)
Dr. Todd Tipton, classical guitarist
Cincinnati, OH, USA (available via Skype)

D.Cass
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Re: Exercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by D.Cass » Thu Nov 02, 2017 8:35 pm

There are many studies that look at M A fingers, all are worth investigating. However, the main question I pose is why is m and a thin. I and M are not thin, so I would conclude that the A finger is creating the thin sound. How is the A finger attacking the string? What is the action after the it plays. In other words, what is the follow through with the A finger?

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Tomzooki
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Re: Exercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by Tomzooki » Thu Nov 02, 2017 11:20 pm

Be careful with AM exercices. It is totally normal to have much less independance between A and M compared to between I and M or I and A, for complex anatomical reasons. If you work on AM alternance too hard you may end with a nasty tendonitis. In « real life » it is extremely rare that we have to alternate between them for more than 3 notes. The most common case where it may cause problem is the PIMAMIP arpegio; because it is common in the repertoire it is wise to work on it. And, why not, the 1st Villa-Lobos study :wink:
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Todd Tipton
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Re: Exercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by Todd Tipton » Fri Nov 03, 2017 9:38 pm

Tomzooki wrote:
Thu Nov 02, 2017 11:20 pm
Be careful with AM exercices...If you work on AM alternance too hard you may end with a nasty tendonitis.
Amen!
Dr. Todd Tipton, classical guitarist
Cincinnati, OH, USA (available via Skype)

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Non Tabius
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Re: Exercise for right hand A & M fingers

Post by Non Tabius » Fri Nov 03, 2017 10:44 pm

I find "Asturius" (triplet section) to be a nice warm-up at around, say 135 bpm.It allows for alternating p i m and in some instances p a m. Specifically p i m from bars 17-24 ;37-42; and of course the last six bars before the Lento.Villa Lobos Etude 1 is great but don't forget his Prelude 4 "animato" section.The other suggestions already made are all great.See it like any sport. Don't charge on to the field at full blast, warm up properly first, slowly and then gradually move on as you feel more comfortable.I know I am stating the obvious, but take weather conditions into account as well.Fingers move a little easier in Summer than they do in Winter.

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