Counting Rumbas

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guitarrista
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by guitarrista » Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:44 pm

2/4 vs. 4/4 by itself does not tell you much except how the composer has chosen to divide the composition into measures. However, there are historical conventions (which are not consistently followed) about how the music would be expected to be phrased or accented associated with certain time signatures. The 2/4 vs. 4/4 also makes no sense in the context of oral tradition, which is how rumbas were created and transmitted for a long time.
Konstantin
--
1982 Anselmo Solar Gonzalez

twistedblues
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by twistedblues » Thu Nov 30, 2017 12:42 am

What right hand fingers would you recommend for bar 22? pimimim?

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guitarrista
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by guitarrista » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:14 am

You can do pimimim or pamiami or pimiami - whatever feels more comfortable.
Konstantin
--
1982 Anselmo Solar Gonzalez

twistedblues
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by twistedblues » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:20 am

I’m having a bit of trouble articulating notes at the speed the song is at using only im but im thinking with more practice using two fingers with articulation will become a lot easier?

twistedblues
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by twistedblues » Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:38 am

guitarrista wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:44 pm
2/4 vs. 4/4 by itself does not tell you much except how the composer has chosen to divide the composition into measures. However, there are historical conventions (which are not consistently followed) about how the music would be expected to be phrased or accented associated with certain time signatures. The 2/4 vs. 4/4 also makes no sense in the context of oral tradition, which is how rumbas were created and transmitted for a long time.
Thank you!

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guitarrista
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by guitarrista » Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:04 am

twistedblues wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:20 am
I’m having a bit of trouble articulating notes at the speed the song is at using only im but im thinking with more practice using two fingers with articulation will become a lot easier?
That's partly why I also offered pamiami i.e. p ami ami which lets you have more time for each finger before it is "called" to play again. It is just like doing arpeggios except a bit unconventional in terms of which strings are engaged.

As to im alternation - yes, more practice will eventually make your im alternation faster. Don't be afraid to try occasional short bursts like imi mim or imim mimi from time to time as you practice. Also some people think that practicing ma alternation makes im alternation faster - sort of a general finger dexterity effect.
Konstantin
--
1982 Anselmo Solar Gonzalez

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Blondie
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by Blondie » Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:28 am

twistedblues wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:25 pm
Can someone explain the difference between a rumba in 2/4 and 4/4? This tab is in 2/4 and this wiki link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhumba has rumba in 2/4
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhumba# ... attern.png

Yet all the videos I see on YouTube explain that rumbas are always in 4/4..
Firstly how one chooses to notate is usually a personal matter but it should be influenced by tempo. Herencia Latina for example is a very fast rumba. If you were tapping your foot feeling this in 4/4 your foot would be going like the clappers, crazy fast. 2/4 is a sensible way to denote the regular pulse.

However...In order to teach the flamenco rumba rhythm as a technique its convenient to slow things down and teach it at a slower tempo in 4/4 as it's easier to break things downs in terms of subdivisions and the accents when discussing technique: we have four beats and four off beats, nice and simple.

However number 2... just to confuse you more... the wikipedia entry you posted is discussing ballroom rumba, which is not the same as a flamenco rumba, just like flamenco tangos are completely different from Argentine tangos :)

twistedblues
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Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by twistedblues » Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:21 pm

guitarrista wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 2:04 am
twistedblues wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 1:20 am
I’m having a bit of trouble articulating notes at the speed the song is at using only im but im thinking with more practice using two fingers with articulation will become a lot easier?
That's partly why I also offered pamiami i.e. p ami ami which lets you have more time for each finger before it is "called" to play again. It is just like doing arpeggios except a bit unconventional in terms of which strings are engaged.

As to im alternation - yes, more practice will eventually make your im alternation faster. Don't be afraid to try occasional short bursts like imi mim or imim mimi from time to time as you practice. Also some people think that practicing ma alternation makes im alternation faster - sort of a general finger dexterity effect.
Thank you!

twistedblues
Posts: 208
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 7:48 pm

Re: Counting Rumbas

Post by twistedblues » Sat Dec 02, 2017 5:21 pm

Blondie wrote:
Thu Nov 30, 2017 8:28 am
twistedblues wrote:
Wed Nov 29, 2017 10:25 pm
Can someone explain the difference between a rumba in 2/4 and 4/4? This tab is in 2/4 and this wiki link https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhumba has rumba in 2/4
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhumba# ... attern.png

Yet all the videos I see on YouTube explain that rumbas are always in 4/4..
Firstly how one chooses to notate is usually a personal matter but it should be influenced by tempo. Herencia Latina for example is a very fast rumba. If you were tapping your foot feeling this in 4/4 your foot would be going like the clappers, crazy fast. 2/4 is a sensible way to denote the regular pulse.

However...In order to teach the flamenco rumba rhythm as a technique its convenient to slow things down and teach it at a slower tempo in 4/4 as it's easier to break things downs in terms of subdivisions and the accents when discussing technique: we have four beats and four off beats, nice and simple.

However number 2... just to confuse you more... the wikipedia entry you posted is discussing ballroom rumba, which is not the same as a flamenco rumba, just like flamenco tangos are completely different from Argentine tangos :)
Thank you!

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