Tremolo, anyone?

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nylonthanh

tremolo

Post by nylonthanh » Thu Oct 20, 2005 9:56 pm

wow! That's a great teaching aid! Probably help with strengthing other techniques also! I'll have to give this a whirl! Maybe I can have 24" forearms!

merry_zhao

Post by merry_zhao » Fri Oct 21, 2005 2:59 am

Practice with your clock, a note to be played every second. Wanna be fast? Then change a machine to increase the speed of the timing. Slowly increase the speed.
Last edited by merry_zhao on Fri Oct 21, 2005 3:34 am, edited 1 time in total.

esteban andres

newbie

Post by esteban andres » Fri Oct 21, 2005 3:16 am

Hi, i've read this post and i realy learned alot. Im' a beginner in cg,only five months. Nice video from cecile by the way.

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charlesivey
Posts: 1983
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 5:48 am
Location: Texas

Post by charlesivey » Tue Nov 15, 2005 4:36 am

Has anyone played Tarrega's version of Gottschalk: "Gran Tremolo" from Opus 58?

Digging through my old guitar studies from the sixties, I came across this piece -- a transcription by Tarrega himself with fingerings by Isaias Savio (in 1965). It is 10 pages long without repeats! Looking at the score reminded me of why I did not want to learn it years ago. Today, it looks a bit more formidable than it did back then. Thought I would ask if any of you have come across this amazing work.
CI

"Things should be made as simple as possible, but not any simpler" A. Einstein

Florentin Tise

Post by Florentin Tise » Wed Nov 16, 2005 7:26 pm

has that piece been recorded by any artist that you know of?

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charlesivey
Posts: 1983
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 5:48 am
Location: Texas

Post by charlesivey » Thu Nov 17, 2005 3:38 am

I do not know if it has been recorded, but it was obviously something Tarrega spent time and effort to transcribe. That is a big suggestion that it is "worthwhile." The problem I have with it is the sheer volume of notes, even if the melody is suggestive of what to play. The publication I found from 1965 is a treasure of 12 pieces that Tarrega worked upon.
CI

"Things should be made as simple as possible, but not any simpler" A. Einstein

TedtheBear

Lazy " -a" - finger

Post by TedtheBear » Mon Nov 21, 2005 1:40 am

Hi, what advice do you have to offer to someone with a lazy "a" finger? I have no problem with "i", "m". The "a" finger throws me off. I've tried the rubber band trick and tried staccato (sp?).
Thanks,
Ted

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charlesivey
Posts: 1983
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 5:48 am
Location: Texas

Post by charlesivey » Mon Nov 21, 2005 4:34 am

Play the studies... Giuliani's Allegretto in C is a good one.
CI

"Things should be made as simple as possible, but not any simpler" A. Einstein

Florentin Tise

Post by Florentin Tise » Mon Nov 21, 2005 8:41 pm

which one is that? Is that a study-type piece, or is it part of a larger work?
thanx

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charlesivey
Posts: 1983
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 5:48 am
Location: Texas

Post by charlesivey » Tue Nov 22, 2005 4:38 am

Finding the "real name" of this Giuliani Allegretto is proving difficult. It is likely not one of the typical studies. It is an easy warm-up. I started through the long list of Giuliani compositions looking for it on the Danish site... but he was...prolific. I only have a copyright booklet copy of the piece.

It begins with C C G chord forms... in a stately manner, then moves forward with three or four "sections" staying in the key of C, and finishes up with a spritely pedal and finale. The sections have an alternating use of m and a after p,i in the chords and triples, so it makes using the "a" finger come out naturally. Very easy piece for a beginner, but to play at actual tempo is fun. It is a short "one pager," full of energy.
CI

"Things should be made as simple as possible, but not any simpler" A. Einstein

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Sanft
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Location: Somewhere over the... ah, forget it: Germany

Post by Sanft » Sat Nov 26, 2005 8:37 pm

One of the methods I started to practice tremolo with was to play without sound: You start on the first string and play p with force and then at the same moment you put a on the string and pluck again with force, followed by m, then i. The trick is to get the next finger at exactly the same moment on the string, that the former one did pluck and in doing so the string doesn't sound. That way the movement of your fingers becomes very small yet forcefull. It's not an easy thing to achieve, but it has great effect and results in a smooth, small and fast tremolo movement.
CU! Clemens 8)
"...si nos quedáramos cuarenta y ocho horas seguidas sin música, habria una catástrofe mundial." Leo Brouwer
7stringed Matthias Dammann 1997; 9stringed Neuner&Hornsteiner ~ 1880
7stringed 1829 Staufer/Legnani replica by F. P. Dietrich 2007

Florentin Tise

Post by Florentin Tise » Fri Dec 02, 2005 5:07 pm

I've tried it Sanft. It is tricky. It also depends on the length of one fingernails. Mine are medium length.

escalj7676

Post by escalj7676 » Sun Dec 04, 2005 7:48 am

thats sounds nice sanft ill try that

Freeman

Post by Freeman » Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:13 pm

Sanft1 wrote:You start on the first string and play p with force and then at the same moment you put a on the string and pluck again with force, followed by m, then i.
This is how I learned. We call it a "plant" and is very helpful to learn on the lower strings where there isn't as much room for movement of the fingers.

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MurrayK
Posts: 225
Joined: Tue Nov 22, 2005 5:28 am
Location: Hunter Valley, NSW, Australia

Post by MurrayK » Tue Dec 20, 2005 11:17 pm

There are not many, if any, truly simple tremolo pieces around, that I could find anyway. I've found it best to pick a simple arpeggio piece and modify it to tremolo. So that I can concentrate on the tremolo and not worry about my left hand too much.

I'm not a huge fan of the Carcassi piece op60#7 for tremolo. While it is an interesting piece I dont feel it's done much to help my tremolo.

I've started practicing a tremolo version of Tarrega's Sudy in E minor as done by macdupac in the mp3 section viewtopic.php?t=2504 . This is really helping me for 2 reasons. 1- It is quite beautiful to play (with or without tremolo) and 2 - The tremolo is all on the 1st string which is easier.

Also a small change in the way I hold the guitar has really squared up my hands and made it much easier to play tremolo. The idea for this came from reading this posting: viewtopic.php?t=2008

Finally another article I read about practicing scales using tremolo, PAMI, is also helping. I try and play each note for as long as it takes to sound right and then move on.
Regards
Murray

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