Using music notation software to learn new pieces

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cpierce

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by cpierce » Mon Mar 30, 2009 3:02 am

Thank you.
Can you tell me some features of the program that you particularly like, or that work well with guitar music.
For instance can you turn stem how ever you want? Can you add fingering notes too?
Can you put in piano music and transpose it to guitar?

flameproof

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by flameproof » Mon Mar 30, 2009 8:53 am

For notation I use MuseScore (which is open-source freeware) available here. I really cannot speak highly enough about it -- it is a relatively new product and inevitably has some bugs (but there's a forum where one can seek support and report bugs where the response is usually quick and helpful).

It knocks the socks of Finale and makes GuitarPro look (and feel) like a toy (GP does do tab though, if that's something you insist upon).


Examples of MuseScore's output can be found:
Here (a simple unfingered piece)
or here (more complicated, fully fingered)

~~~

I use an old version of CakeWalk if I need to work on a section of a piece, or sort out some complicated rhythm solely because it is enormously flexible and quick when adding notes or selecting a section to repeat ad infinitum.

rustuk

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by rustuk » Mon Mar 30, 2009 10:24 am

do a search for Power Tab it is free
Yours Neil

cpierce

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by cpierce » Mon Mar 30, 2009 12:23 pm

Thank you all! This has been very helpful. I will probably try a couple of the free ones first.

CPA

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by CPA » Mon Mar 30, 2009 1:53 pm

musedit , basically same functionality as tabedit but to me is easier to enter text and has a larger per-set library of chords if you would choose to enter the diagrams with your notation

Cuyler

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by Cuyler » Mon Mar 30, 2009 9:54 pm

cpierce wrote:I will probably try a couple of the free ones first.
Wikipedia has this list of available music score software. It can help sort out all the options.

cpierce

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by cpierce » Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:01 am

I looked at the Wiki site and WOW! I didn't know that there were so many programs to choose from. I also didn't know that you could look up a comparison of programs like that. Thanks.

I don't do much with TAB so I downloaded the MuseScore software as it seemed more notation oriented.
It is open source and will probably only get better.
So far I am very impressed with it. It seems to have lots of functionality, but it is still simple enough for me to start using it "right out of the box" so to speak.

I am excited to use this to help me in learning new pieces and so much more.
Thanks again everyone!

Cuyler

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by Cuyler » Tue Mar 31, 2009 1:58 am

There was also this thread where a lot of people discussed their experiences with various software packages. If you try out something, please let us know how it worked for you.

cpierce

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by cpierce » Thu Apr 02, 2009 1:35 pm

I installed MuseScore, and it is working very well for me. At first I had trouble with it staying up, but I found that it was a conflict with another program that I was running. As soon as I closed that program the problem went away.

I have a long way to go yet before I really know how to use this program well, but I am very impressed with it so far.

It seems to have a lot of flexablity and power.
I remember now trying to use Finale Notepad a year or two ago, but I had given up on it as it wouldn't do a good score without going to the expensive version.

MuseScore is so much better, even after only a few days of evaluation!

Thanks again for everyone's information --- This site is great!!

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KevinCollins
Posts: 1307
Joined: Sat Jun 14, 2008 2:01 am
Location: Amherst, Mass, USA

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by KevinCollins » Thu Apr 02, 2009 4:29 pm

Finale is the gold standard, cp, and Notepad may be all you need for guitar. A great thing is to be able to open midi files in standard notation. Be careful, though, mistakes abound.

Many pdf's of pieces are around that were printed with music notation software. There is a solution called PDFtoMusic from the French company, Myriad, that will open and play these pdf's, as well as save them to midi, which you can then open in Finale.

They have a music notation solution called Melody Assistant that I used to do things that Finale wouldn't. Here is yet another example of French ingenuity from Myriad.

PDFtoMusic reads the pdf document into a file their screen understands, lots of nice features. The pdf must have been created with music notation software. Scanned documents don't work (there are other programs for that). The demo version is limited but does stuff you can use, anyway.

PDFtoMusic
http://www.myriad-online.com/en/index.htm
_________________________
PDFtoMusic.jpg
I went ahead and purchased the pro version, saves to music xml. With the pro version, you can open and save any music pdf (that was created with music notation software) to xml, and then open in Finale or any major music notation software (for educational purposes).

If you would like to scan your music and open it in Finale, there is another solution called Smartscore, again pricey. For someone in my line of work, it makes sense because it is tax-deductible and it pays for itself in the first week, for educational purposes only.

On the other hand, my first computer is still sitting on top of my neck and shoulders and they haven't figured out how to replace it, yet. Start there.

Cheers,

Kevin
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Kevin Collins, Amherst, Mass, USA All rights reserved.

atza

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by atza » Thu Oct 15, 2009 8:16 am

I use guitar pro tablature editor (and score ditor of course)

skmcclure

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by skmcclure » Tue Oct 20, 2009 2:55 am

cpierce wrote:Is anyone aware of any good free or free to try program music notation programs?
You can try MuseScore at musescore.org. It is still a pre 1.0 release but seems to work well.

tvis81

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by tvis81 » Tue Oct 20, 2009 3:34 am

Lick by neck is a cool web site for those of you interested in alternative methods of learning music.
Each song you download is a program that opens into a sort of dual player. On the bottom, the tab
is displayed and on the top is a graph of the neck of a guitar with lights and numbers displaying where
your fingers go in real time. You can slow down and scroll back and forth between measures so that
you can work on the piece at your own pace. One problem is that most of the pieces on the website
are pop songs or jazz standards. Another is that you can't see the music in standard notation. But overall
I think it is a great concept. It serves as an alternative for people who try to learn songs or pieces by
simply watching people on youtube. Fun site, check it out.

t

yoyodunno

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by yoyodunno » Tue Oct 20, 2009 8:16 pm

I use Guitar Pro 5, although I haven't tried it for classical guitar yet. But good idea!

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Steve Kutzer
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Joined: Sat Dec 10, 2005 4:11 pm
Location: Atlanta, Georgia

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by Steve Kutzer » Tue Oct 20, 2009 9:12 pm

I agree, and Guitar Pro is a cheap alternative that has some good features:
  • You can enter 2 voices (but sadly not 3)
  • The simple fact of entering the different voices is instructive
  • You can play them to your sound card together or individually
  • You can have the tempo be anything you want, or even a percentage of the target tempo
  • You can repeatedly loop a section and have each loop increase the tempo (speed trainer)
  • I enter duets and trios, and then can play back the other parts, silencing my part from the playback, and play along. So it is a tremendous aid for duet practice
  • And, as you said, it's great for figuring out tricky rhythms
See my technology (and guitar!) site CIO Dojo

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