Using music notation software to learn new pieces

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gringo
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Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by gringo » Tue Oct 20, 2009 9:31 pm

Using music notation software is a great idea. One of the great advantages of using any of the products mentioned is that you can turn on a metronome feature and count out the piece while you watch the cursor and listen. If you get used to using a metronome when you start playing it will improve your playing for years to come.

Olarte

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by Olarte » Tue Oct 20, 2009 9:47 pm

llebron wrote:I've only been learning the CG since last December. So I'm looking for ways to help me learn the pieces I am assigned. Something that is helping me and may help others is music notation software. I took a few measures from a piece that I was having some trouble with and entered them into the music notation software. This allowed to listen to the piece at a correct rhythm and to slow down the tempo when needed which helped with my practice.

Hope this helps someone else.


Luis


A couple of suggestions. It's a great idea to write down the music to begin with that will help you get familiar with the music, notation sight-reading etc.

As for the tempo check out a program called Slowdowner (or similar ones) which will allow you to slowdown an audio file without distortion so you can read along and\or play.

Windows media (yuk) also has the ability to slowdown video files although not as good but it helps to watch youtube videos (you need to download and convert them first) so you can follow along and watch how it's being played.

Hope this helps.

ivan

yoyodunno

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by yoyodunno » Tue Oct 20, 2009 10:06 pm

Steve Kutzer wrote:I agree, and Guitar Pro is a cheap alternative that has some good features:
  • You can enter 2 voices (but sadly not 3)
  • The simple fact of entering the different voices is instructive
  • You can play them to your sound card together or individually
  • You can have the tempo be anything you want, or even a percentage of the target tempo
  • You can repeatedly loop a section and have each loop increase the tempo (speed trainer)
  • I enter duets and trios, and then can play back the other parts, silencing my part from the playback, and play along. So it is a tremendous aid for duet practice
  • And, as you said, it's great for figuring out tricky rhythms
is that a free version or something? Cause I downloaded the not so free version and you can add as many voices as you need, well at least like 10.

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Steve Kutzer
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Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by Steve Kutzer » Wed Oct 21, 2009 12:55 am

yoyodunno wrote:
Steve Kutzer wrote:I agree, and Guitar Pro is a cheap alternative that has some good features:
  • You can enter 2 voices (but sadly not 3)
  • The simple fact of entering the different voices is instructive
  • You can play them to your sound card together or individually
  • You can have the tempo be anything you want, or even a percentage of the target tempo
  • You can repeatedly loop a section and have each loop increase the tempo (speed trainer)
  • I enter duets and trios, and then can play back the other parts, silencing my part from the playback, and play along. So it is a tremendous aid for duet practice
  • And, as you said, it's great for figuring out tricky rhythms
is that a free version or something? Cause I downloaded the not so free version and you can add as many voices as you need, well at least like 10.
No. GP5 you can add lots of tracks, but not voices. There are only 2 voices available per track. Look at the toolbar - upper or lower voice, one active at a time for musical entry. The very first piece I tried to transcribe was Almeida's version of Satie's Gymnopedie 1. Somewhere along the three quarters point in comes a third voice. I was so bummed! Three voices is very common in classical guitar music, but maybe not so much in other styles. Still, I like GP5 for all the other features listed.
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Jeremiah Lawson
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Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by Jeremiah Lawson » Wed Oct 21, 2009 1:34 am

Using music notation software was how I learned how to really read music so there's nothing wrong with using it as an aid. I learned the slow and hard way. I went through high school not being very good at singing and would listen to better sight-readers and look along in the score as a way to get a sense for reading. It was when I started writing out stuff for fun on Finale ... fifteen years ago ... that I began to really learn the nuts and bolts of how and why things can get written out as they do. Using notation software to learn new pieces is fine.

If memory serves, a way many composers used to learn the works of old masters (Bach included, apparently) was to go copy by hand the works of composers they wanted to emulate. Copying out a score note by note and expression by expression really does give you a stronger sense of what is going on in the music. If you keep in mind examining structural as well as linear elements it can benefit you a great deal. My only suggestion is that if you're new to this don't worry about adding fingerings to the process just yet. :D

Olarte

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by Olarte » Wed Oct 21, 2009 2:55 am

Steve Kutzer wrote:
yoyodunno wrote:
Steve Kutzer wrote:I agree, and Guitar Pro is a cheap alternative that has some good features:
  • You can enter 2 voices (but sadly not 3)
  • The simple fact of entering the different voices is instructive
  • You can play them to your sound card together or individually
  • You can have the tempo be anything you want, or even a percentage of the target tempo
  • You can repeatedly loop a section and have each loop increase the tempo (speed trainer)
  • I enter duets and trios, and then can play back the other parts, silencing my part from the playback, and play along. So it is a tremendous aid for duet practice
  • And, as you said, it's great for figuring out tricky rhythms
is that a free version or something? Cause I downloaded the not so free version and you can add as many voices as you need, well at least like 10.
No. GP5 you can add lots of tracks, but not voices. There are only 2 voices available per track. Look at the toolbar - upper or lower voice, one active at a time for musical entry. The very first piece I tried to transcribe was Almeida's version of Satie's Gymnopedie 1. Somewhere along the three quarters point in comes a third voice. I was so bummed! Three voices is very common in classical guitar music, but maybe not so much in other styles. Still, I like GP5 for all the other features listed.
Which is why I prefer to use Musedit.

tvis81

Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by tvis81 » Fri Oct 23, 2009 9:16 pm

Yea, I guess a lot of people use guitar pro. But I must say that I'd still rather have the paper in front of me. Maybe I'm just old school.

t

jrethorst
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Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by jrethorst » Thu Sep 01, 2011 11:33 pm

jrethorst wrote:You might want to check out Overture or Score Writer (http://geniesoft.com). Especially easy to enter, edit and play back notes. Free demos.
Web site has changed to http://sonicscores.com/
John Rethorst
1983 Alejandro
2004 Yamaha GC-31
Classical and nylon jazz

larryguitar
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Re: Using music notation software to learn new pieces

Post by larryguitar » Sat Jul 22, 2017 12:16 am

I found this old thread and thought it might be worth mentioning that StaffPad is an excellent program to use to learn new pieces.

It supports up to four voices and is able to recognize your musical handwriting and turn it into notation.

It only took me about an hour or so to put in a duet version of Satie's Gnossienne #1. It took a minute to create a version that was transposed up a fourth.

I play along with the program, sometimes muting one voice or the other, or listening to both.

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