D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Wed Nov 02, 2016 8:49 am

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D05.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.



Now we are going to work on a series of exercises:
To render polyphony clearly, you have to be able to control the force applied by each of the fingers plucking the strings.
Here is a little exercise. The first few times that you try it, the exercise will seem impossible to master. Tell yourself that this difficulty, though very real, will be resolved after an hour of diligent work.


We'll start with 2 voices, exercise 107, page 159.
- Bring out the bass played with the thumb. Then bring out the soprano played with the ring finger.

Next, 3 voices, exercise 108 page 159
- Bring out the bass played with the thumb. Then bring out the soprano played with the ring finger. Then bring out the alto played with the middle finger.

And now 4 voices, exercise 109 page 159
- Bring out the bass played with the thumb. Then bring out the soprano played with the ring finger. Then bring out the alto played with the middle finger. Finally bring out the tenor played by the index finger.

Youtube



Once you've managed to bring out a single note in a chord, you've got it beaten!
The easiest thing to start with is to bring out the bass with the thumb.
It can help to exaggerate the movement of whichever finger is plucking more strongly than the others, as I demonstrate on this video.

There are other ways of distinguishing one voice from another. You can apply a different articulation to one voice from that applied to another. For instance, you might play one voice staccato and the other legato. You can also distinguish voices by varying the timbre of each voice. For example, you could play the bass with the flesh of the thumb and the other voices with the nails. We'll see these other techniques in the next lessons.




Today we'll look at 5 pieces.
- page 18 Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
This piece in two sections is based on a sequence of 4 chords: D minor, C major, D minor, A major.
This sequence of 4 chords is repeated in bars 5 to 8, with the last two chords both incorporated into bar 7, in order to be able to finish on the tonic in bar 8, with a chord of D minor. Luys de Narvàez made use of the same contracting together of two chords in bar 7 of his Diferencias sobre guardame las vacas (previous lesson).
As for the rhythm, in the first section, bars 1 to 24, the beat is divided into 4 eighth notes (quavers). In the second section, bars 25 to 64, the beat is divided into 3 eighth notes (quavers). The tempo remains the same, with the overall length of a bar switching from a half note (minim) to a dotted quarter note (dotted crotchet).
Feel free to improvise on this sequence of 4 chords.

Youtube



- page 46 Johann Sebastian Bach (1685-1750) Menuet Anh. 132
This is a minuet with two voices, in the binary form (AABB). The minuet here is in E minor. The first part concludes in the key of the relative major, G major. The second part concludes in the main key, E minor.

Youtube



- page 76 Johann Kaspar Mertz (1806-1856) Ländler opus 12 n°1
A Ländler based on 3 chords, A major, D major and E major (the three bass strings of the guitar). It's easy to make it ring out. The 3 eighth notes (quavers) which start the Ländler can be played freely, without strict tempo. This will help to emphasise (by contrast) the stability of the tempo from bar 9.

Youtube



- page 86 Juliàn Arcas (1832-1882) Preludio en re mayor
This prelude is made up of arpeggios. The second part makes systematic use of the diminished 7th chord.

Youtube


Youtube



- page 108 Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
Here we have a transcription in A minor by Juliàn Arcas. The work uses the rhythm of the polonaise.

Youtube




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and tunes for a week and then to upload your recordings of:
- page 159 Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
- page 18 Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
- page 108 Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja


Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François


Exam qualifying submissions: :
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja


Esteban Crespi
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa

Angela Zhao
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Rick Beauregard
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109

Stewart Doyle
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Marko Räsänen
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109
Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa
Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja
:( + ♫ = :)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Nov 04, 2016 4:41 pm

Anyone have any ideas on additional ways to practice bringing out different voices in Polyphonie that worked for you in the past?
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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Marko Räsänen » Fri Nov 04, 2016 5:49 pm

What I try to do is to apply more pressure with the specific finger before the release part of the plucking action.
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Esteban Crespi
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Esteban Crespi » Thu Nov 10, 2016 10:43 pm

I have recorded a first version of the "Postillón", it's plenty of errors mainly in the most difficult passages, but I'm happy with my progress :-), It's a lovely piece but it is very difficult!. I would love to know your advice before continue working on it.


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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by spanishguitarmusic » Thu Nov 10, 2016 11:48 pm

Esteban Crespi wrote:I have recorded a first version of the "Postillón", it's plenty of errors mainly in the most difficult passages, but I'm happy with my progress :-), It's a lovely piece but it is very difficult!. I would love to know your advice before continue working on it.
:bravo: It's coming along very nice! Keep playing it and it will be perfect! Very nice playing indeed! :merci:

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Nov 11, 2016 1:32 am

:bravo: Estaban for being the first to record. I am having difficulty learning this piece. I think I have all the dots now and need to really learn it then work on tempo. Very slow going. I love the piece but am doing so many reps I may get bored with it! :russa:

I think you have a very good grasp of it. You need to quicken the tempo and add a little rhythmic interest and articulation, some staccato, to give it a polonaise feel. But that is interpretive. Lock down the notes and rhythm and you have it!

Wascha Mesa was a little easier for me, but tempo is still a challenge. I am working my way up the metronome. I am also practicing the Bach Minuet. This is a harder piece than it at first appears, and difficult to play well. But worth the effort I think.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

Esteban Crespi
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Esteban Crespi » Fri Nov 11, 2016 3:56 pm

Thanks both for your comments and advice.

Rick I agree with you the Minuet is very nice, I have tried it a little bit, just reading and comment the score with fingerings and positions. I always find Bach extremely difficult, it seem you need to split your brain in two (or more) to handle the different voices.

Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Stewart Doyle » Sat Nov 12, 2016 2:54 pm

Hi Estaban


:bravo: I agree it's coming along nicely. I agree with Rick about trying to bring out the 'snappiness', particularly in the first section and towards the end. In the second section I wasn't sure if your rhythm was quite right for the first 4 notes in bars 26, 28, 30 etc. In the end I couldn't tell for sure but for this section, up to about bar 41, I think you can employ some more fluid and legato playing.
This will be my third year attempting to master this piece, and I can't say I'm too keen. I think that's wholly down to the fact that I find it so hard.
In fact, I've taken a short break to record a piece for the virtual duo/trio section of this site. The was partly to try out some recording software I've recently got, but there was also a strong element of 'El Postillon' avoidance! I really needed an enjoyable distraction before I tried playing and recording it for a third year. Anyway, I think I'll try some practice dedicated to the final 7 bars of El Postillon!

:bye:
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Angela Zhao
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Angela Zhao » Sat Nov 12, 2016 3:44 pm

Hi Esteban
Your play have very good tone and musicality, if the slur more clearly, it will be very good.
And I think you can choose the speed you suitable, just keep the song pleasant to hear, that our goal.
:bravo:

Hi classmate
This is my record, as limited by conditions, I can't play it many times.
The record have many mistakes, I'm sorry for that.
Please give your comments, thank you very much.
Delcamp Polyhponie N°109

Youtube


Hans Neusiedler (1508-1563) Wascha mesa

Youtube


Cristóbal Oudrid (1825-1877) El postillon de la rioja

Youtube

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Rick Beauregard » Sat Nov 12, 2016 5:00 pm

:bravo: Very well done Angela.

Your polyphonic exercise is very good. Each voice is discinct.

El Postillon is very good. Great tempo, you hit all or most of the notes. There are a few rhythm issues. I don't have the score in front of me now, but try listening to Prof. Delcamp again and practice getting the feel of the polonaise.

Wascha Mesa A section is very good. Good articulation of the notes, great tempo. Your transition to the B section was very good. You didn't have any difficulty in the transition and kept the tempo consistent. But there are issues with the rhythm. Again I don't have the score in front of me to give you specific recommendations, but listen again and count out those dotted rhythms. You should have no problem getting it. Your command of the notes is excellent. You also varied the tone and dynamics. I would emphasize this even more.

I notice from listening to a lot of your recordings that rhythm is often a challenge for you. This is something that often comes naturally to some and is a challenge to some. Take the time to count and tap out the rhythms to work out these difficulties. Since they are mostly repetitive, once you have it it is easy to incorporate it into your playing.
All this time I thought I was making music; it was making me.
2015 Steve Ganz "Solidarity"
1980 Dauphin D30
1962 Fender pre-CBS P-Bass
National Triolian Uke ca.1930
Almost as many fly rods as guitars
_/) _/)
_/)

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Angela Zhao
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Angela Zhao » Sun Nov 13, 2016 12:39 am

Hi Rick
Thank your comments!
Yes, the rhythm is a big problem for me.
As for me to learn guitar, I totally learn by myself, no teacher teach me. If I have problem, I try to look up in internet, so I haven't the basis of formal training from beginning, I haven't attached great importance to the rhythm of problem.
And thanks Delcamp give us this good paltform, let me know my problem. Thank you give me lots of advices. :merci:

Esteban Crespi
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Esteban Crespi » Sun Nov 13, 2016 9:59 am

Hello Angela, Bravo for your interpretation. I'm very impressed with tempo and the almos flawless execution.

I agree with Rick, the rhythm in the second half of Wascha Mesa doesn't sound quite right, I think you are playing
quarter-sixteenth-sixteenth | eighth-eighth-eighth
instead of
dotted eighth-sixteenth-eighth | eighth-eighth-eighth
but you play so fast it is very difficult to tell for sure!

Hi Stewart thank you very much for your advice, I will work on it. I wish you good luck with the piece!

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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Jesús Morote » Sun Nov 13, 2016 12:22 pm

I think that in general Esteban is right over the rhythm of the second part of Wascha Mesa, Angela.
In 27th bar (and all the bars with the same pattern) you play eighth-eighth-eighth, instead dotted eighth-sixteenth-eighth.
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Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Stewart Doyle » Sun Nov 13, 2016 1:15 pm

Hi Angela

:bravo: Well played!

The first two passes of the Polyphony are very well done, with the emphasis very clear. Less so for the following two, but I remember from last year how hard this exercise is. [The barking dog comes over well too! :D ]

Regarding the rhythm in Wascha Mesa, I'm hoping this video might help. I should really have carried on counting to show that the E in bars 33 and 37 is played on the off-beat, on the 'and' after beat 2. As someone who struggles to play at anything like your excellent tempi, it's great to have an excuse to play slowly :lol:

Excerpt, Bars 25-40, Wascha Mesa

Youtube
Last edited by Stewart Doyle on Sun Nov 13, 2016 7:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Stewart Doyle
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Re: D05 Classical guitar lesson 03

Post by Stewart Doyle » Sun Nov 13, 2016 3:18 pm

Hi Angela

I've listened to your El Postillon now and it's at an impressive speed, although it would really benefit from the greater expressiveness that some rubato would give. As Rick mentioned there are some rhythmic issues. In bars 26, 28, 30 etc. the first four high notes should be equal length and should, I think, be 'brought out' to demonstrate that the piece has a different feel here. You obviously have great technique, and/or great practice technique, as you don't seem to struggle with the 'difficult' passages.

Just on the Wascha Mesa; I'm not sure if the video will help but you could also try something I found useful. Namely, just playing the top notes of the melody in the second section. This makes it easier to practice and learn the rhythm...
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