D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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Jean-François Delcamp
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D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Dec 05, 2017 9:19 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D03.
If you are new to the course, please read this message to familiarize yourself with the conditions for participating in the lessons. You should also read the first message in lesson 1, where you will find advice on how to make the most of your study time and on the methods of practising that I recommend.




Today, we're going to work on a series of exercises.
- page 89, numbers 13, 14, 15 - Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) GAMMES - SCALE - SCALES – ESCALAS
When changes of position are needed, you will be using the "position shift" technique. Position I is the left hand position where the index finger (1) is placed behind the 1st fret, position V is the hand position where the index (1) is placed behind the fifth fret, etc. The position shift involves moving the left hand along the neck, from position to position, from fret to fret. In the scales we're looking at today, notice that my first finger never leaves the first string, I use it as a guide for my hand. Position shifts are shown by oblique lines linking two fingering indications given for the same finger.
The following videos are for numbers 13, 14, 15 on page 89. Concentrate your practice on the passages highlighted in yellow, and do your best to perfect the position shift technique.

Youtube


Youtube


Youtube




- Page 94, numbers 29, 30, 31. Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) LIAISONS - LEGATURE - SLURS – LIGADOS
We have already worked on the rest stroke (apoyando) with the fingers of the right hand. Now we are going to work on doing a rest stroke with the fingers of the left hand. That is the best way to learn how to execute descending slurs. In number 30, bar 2, the fingers of the left hand execute the slurs with the help of the rest stroke. The fingers 4, 3, 2 and then 1 pluck the second string then finish their move by coming up against the first string. Place the left hand fingers vertically in relation to the fingerboard, that's the right position to play slurs.

Youtube


Youtube


Youtube







Finally, we'll look at 3 pieces, pages 14, 30, 46 et 47.
- page 14 Francis CUTTING (ca. 1600) PACKINGTON'S POUND
There are numerous repetitions, so vary the tone colour to avoid monotony. To obtain different tone colours, play:
- over the soundhole (the sound volume is at its best here and you get a good balance between the bass and treble notes);
- over the fingerboard (the sound here is softer, closer to the that of a clarinet, and the basses are softened);
- near the bridge (the sound here is more metallic, and becomes close to that of the harpsichord, the basses are strengthened and the trebles weakened).

Youtube




- page 30 Gaspar SANZ (1640-1710) SALTAREN
This dance will serve as a basis for improvisation work proposed in lesson N. 7. The sequence of the three following chords: D Major, G Major, A Major requires imagination to avoid monotony. In order to avoid monotony use dynamic changes (fortissimo, forte, piano, pianissimo), different sound colors (sound hole, fingerboard, bridge, with nail, no nail) and different strumming styles: rasgueados, plucked chords, arpegiated to the bass or treble, etc … .

Youtube




- page 46-47 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ANDANTE
This piece consists of three sections, the third section being identical to the first, so it has an A-B-B-A structure, also called ternary form.
Vary the tone colour to avoid monotony.

Youtube





I advise you to work on all the exercises and the four pieces for a week. Then please record and upload your recordings of the following:
- page 14 Francis CUTTING (ca. 1600) PACKINGTON'S POUND
- page 30 Gaspar SANZ (1640-1710) SALTAREN




Good luck!


I thank Eric (wchymeUS) and Geoff (GeoffB) who have helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

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Exam qualifying submissions:

PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

David Florea
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

Jenni Gribble
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN
:( + ♫ = :)

David Florea
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by David Florea » Fri Dec 08, 2017 12:18 am

Hello , please review my submissions for D03-D04
PACKINGTON'S POUND
SALTAREN

Youtube



Youtube

Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Tue Dec 12, 2017 7:58 pm

Very nice David. What are you doing differently in regards to practice?

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Jenni Gribble
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jenni Gribble » Wed Dec 13, 2017 1:27 am

I agree, very nice David. :D :D

Here are my submissions. Packington's Pound is played on my Cordoba mini guitar, which is tuned to ADGCEA (like a capo at the 5th fret). I think my rhythm is off in the Saltaren, even though I am counting. I am going to try to work that out. I am generally challenged when it comes to strumming.
Packington's Pound.mp3
Saltaren.mp3
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2016 Cordoba Parlor C9, Cedar
2017 Cordoba Mini Guitar - M
2017 Martin 000-15sm

Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Wed Dec 13, 2017 4:08 pm

Hi Jenni,

Nicely done.
I'm counting the Saltaren, 1 and 2, AND, 3 and, or 1, 2, AND, 3.
Try plucking the chords until you internalize the rhythm.

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Jenni Gribble
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jenni Gribble » Thu Dec 14, 2017 9:43 pm

Thank you Salvatore! Plucking the chords is a great idea.
2016 Cordoba Parlor C9, Cedar
2017 Cordoba Mini Guitar - M
2017 Martin 000-15sm

David Florea
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by David Florea » Fri Dec 15, 2017 2:35 pm

Salvatore Lovinello wrote:
Tue Dec 12, 2017 7:58 pm
Very nice David. What are you doing differently in regards to practice?
Salvatore, I have taken your advise on the finger placement above the frets and scale practice. I believe that I’m making progress due to that plus multiple repetiions when practicing. I begin slow then repeat more difficult passages. I’ve kept my nose to the grind stone and look at learning as a process. I enjoy the process, and try NOT do not get FRUSTRATed with the progress. Patient ,practice produces progress. I believe we all have strengths and weakness and progress at different rates. I’ve seen students that I began with who have quickly surpassed me and are in levels 5 and 6 already. Im not in a race. This Delcampe method is absolutely the best method I’ve ever tried I believe because students progress at different rates. Sorry for the long winded explanation. That’s pretty much it.

David Florea
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by David Florea » Fri Dec 15, 2017 2:41 pm

Jenni, I love the tone of your guitar. It has a beautiful rich sound! Playing sounds great to me. Keep it up! Dave

Salvatore Lovinello
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Sat Dec 16, 2017 3:05 pm

Nicely done David!

I had a very similar experience as you except it happened when I started playing for my wife's church choir. I played very poorly. I couldn't keep up with the ensemble. I couldn't even finish the mass because of pain. Then my wife gave me an article titled, "How To Survive a Catholic Mass for Guitarists". It stressed daily scales and gave a simple exercise. Then I read about how Segovia, and I'm sure every other world class guitarist, starts each practice day with 2 HOURS of scales so that his "hands would do what he told them to do." Yes, scales have made a very big positive difference in my playing ability. It's also a big help with improvisation whether alone or with other instruments or singers.

I wouldn't worry about the youngsters moving very quickly compared to us. They will eventually plateau as they grow older. Learning new music or techniques will be just hard for them as is it is for us. I too lived in the house of youthful arrogance. I moved out about the time I saw professional athletes look more like children than men and women.

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Jenni Gribble
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Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Jenni Gribble » Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:52 am

Great discussion! I would like to also say that great deal of it has to do with muscle memory, which takes time and practice to develop. Guitar also requires intricate finger movements as well as strength. I like how the lessons have progressed. Formations that used to be difficult, like high D and low A, are old hat now. I have trouble with my right hand, but it seems to be settling a bit.

Dave, thanks for the compliment on my guitar. It is a smaller guitar that has a classical width neck. It looks like a renaissance guitar. I find that I am more likely to practice if I play it, rather than my larger guitar. I can reach around it easily and I like how it sounds. I guess it is my practice guitar.
2016 Cordoba Parlor C9, Cedar
2017 Cordoba Mini Guitar - M
2017 Martin 000-15sm

Salvatore Lovinello
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Posts: 164
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 1:31 pm
Location: Chesterton, Indiana

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 04

Post by Salvatore Lovinello » Sun Dec 24, 2017 3:11 pm

Merry Christmas and happy New Year fellow students and delcampers.

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