Students' Corner

The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.
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The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
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QuintinBulnes
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by QuintinBulnes » Thu Sep 08, 2016 4:05 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote:
John Montes wrote:I'll probably be working on D05 pieces with you guys this year :-)
Me too! :D But I'll need to do some camera shopping first, as my previous recorder broke down.
------

Hey Marko,

What type of setup do you have? I am curious as I would like to get a better setup for sharing and recording the lessons.

Quintin.
"Si de noche lloras por el sol, no verás las estrellas."

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Marko Räsänen » Thu Sep 08, 2016 6:30 pm

QuintinBulnes wrote:What type of setup do you have? I am curious as I would like to get a better setup for sharing and recording the lessons.
Hi Quintin,

I'm replacing my Zoom Q3HD recorder with ZoomQ4N. For the audio I've been using a matched pair of Rode NT5 mics usually in ORTF configuration, connected to a small mixer with phantom power capability, which in turn connects to Zoom's line in. That way I get video and audio in a single recording, avoiding having to sync them later, so I'll just need to trim out the excess, and save the best take. If I want to do any processing with the audio (such as normalize the level, or add some reverb), it's easy to extract from the video and paste back after processing.

As an alternative to NT5 pair, I've sometimes used Samson VR88 ribbon mic connected to Golden Age Project PRE-73 MKII preamp.

However, I feel that the setup used won't make much difference if the recording room sounds bad, which was the case for me, and therefore the single best thing to improve the audio quality in my recordings was to acoustically treat the recording room. I have a diffuser at the ceiling (although I'm not sure how much difference does it make), a bass trap in the nearest corner, and some absorber panels placed on critical spots at the walls.
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QuintinBulnes
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by QuintinBulnes » Thu Sep 08, 2016 7:22 pm

Thanks for the feedback Marko! Sounds like you are all setup with acoustics and the ability for post-production, just need to get better at the production!

:bravo:

:casque:

:D
"Si de noche lloras por el sol, no verás las estrellas."

Georgi Chernishov
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Georgi Chernishov » Sun Sep 25, 2016 9:17 am

Hello,

I have a few questions:

Studying the 1st exercise of the 1st lesson of Level 1 (page 6) I noticed some difference in the notation of damping a string. As far as I can understand, the star indicates damping the preceding note. Thus, in the 1st line I should damp Е played as a half note. In the 2nd line the star is above G showing that I should damp the preceding B played as a half note. Am I right? What does then that line going from the 4th G to the star over the full D mean? The same happens right below in the following line.

Thank you!

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Marko Räsänen » Sun Sep 25, 2016 12:30 pm

Hi Georgi,

My understanding is that the line is sometimes used to clarify which note should be damped. This is especially useful with polyphonic music, where the note to be damped isn't necessarily the one that was played immediately before. In this case I don't think there is any specific reason why the line is sometimes used, and other times not.
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Georgi Chernishov
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Georgi Chernishov » Sun Sep 25, 2016 12:49 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote:Hi Georgi,

My understanding is that the line is sometimes used to clarify which note should be damped. This is especially useful with polyphonic music, where the note to be damped isn't necessarily the one that was played immediately before. In this case I don't think there is any specific reason why the line is sometimes used, and other times not.
Thank you very much!

DaveMoutrie
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by DaveMoutrie » Mon Sep 26, 2016 6:39 pm

Hello,

I would like to post my first video in the lessons section.

Would I be correct in assuming that it is simply a matter of uploading a video to YouTube then cutting and pasting the URL into a message?

Many thanks.
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Marko Räsänen
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Sep 26, 2016 7:39 pm

Hi Dave, see the instructions here: viewtopic.php?f=30&t=49794
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DaveMoutrie
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by DaveMoutrie » Tue Sep 27, 2016 3:19 am

Thanks Marko, got it wrong first attempt, but think I have it now.
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Georgi Chernishov
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Georgi Chernishov » Thu Oct 06, 2016 5:01 pm

Guys, I don't know what's going on. Whenever I am trying to record a tune, I always get confused and mix up the notes. Sometimes I forget what to play next. When the cam is off I can play the tune without any problems. I am not getting nervous when I am being recorded and no one is watching me. I don't know what to do. Has anyone experienced the same? I am a beginner.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Marko Räsänen » Fri Oct 07, 2016 7:08 am

Hi Georgi, recording yourself will always be distracting to some degree. We all play better with camera off :lol:
Just keep doing it, and you'll get used to it, and will learn to better concentrate on the actual playing even when the camera is on.

Many of us keep the camera recording, play the piece multiple times, and then select the best version using some editing software.
Alhambra 4P spruce
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Cordoba C12 spruce

Georgi Chernishov
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Georgi Chernishov » Fri Oct 07, 2016 7:31 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote:Hi Georgi, recording yourself will always be distracting to some degree. We all play better with camera off :lol:
Just keep doing it, and you'll get used to it, and will learn to better concentrate on the actual playing even when the camera is on.

Many of us keep the camera recording, play the piece multiple times, and then select the best version using some editing software.
Marko, thank you for your support! :)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Oct 07, 2016 8:54 pm

Here's a couple tips I've recently read. Practice two ways.
1. Break the piece into small section and practice each one until you can play them 10 times clean in a row. Work on the difficult passages more. Then join small sections into larger sections to connect them and play 10 in a row clean. Then the whole piece. THEN start with the sections at the end and go backwards 10 in a row to make sure these later measures get equal time. By now you should really have the piece down.
2. Practice performances. Play the piece through with no stopping as if you were performing it. If you make an error go right over it without slowing down or stopping till you finish. Don't start this though until you've done 1. above.

The problem is, the way most of us practice is to try to play the entire piece front to back. When we make a mistake we stop and start over from the beginning. So the first measures get lots of practice and the later ones not so much. And we are practicing stopping when we hit a snag instead of playing through. We need both kinds of practice, slow steady in parts, and more complete performance practice too.
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Colin Bullock
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Colin Bullock » Mon Oct 10, 2016 7:50 am

Marko Räsänen wrote:
QuintinBulnes wrote:What type of setup do you have? I am curious as I would like to get a better setup for sharing and recording the lessons.
Hi Quintin,

I'm replacing my Zoom Q3HD recorder with ZoomQ4N.
Marko, have you tried this out yet? If so how are you getting on with the fixed focal length?

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: Students' Corner

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Oct 10, 2016 8:53 am

Colin, my lesson 1 submissions were all recorded with Q4N with less than one meter away. The audio when using the built-in capsules of the recorder is good enough so that I haven't had the need to use any external microphones for the lessons recordings.

Regarding fixed focal length, as you can see from my recordings, the angle is very wide, which lets me to get the recorder close enough for the mics to work well (not record too much of the room sound). The downside is the fisheye type of distortion clearly visible in my videos. Q3HD was fixed focal length as well, but the angle of view was considerably narrower, which meant that in order to get the built-in mics close enough meant cutting off the head, which was partly why I ended up using external microphones.

Q4N is easy to use, it has a rotating LCD screen, it attaches to a standard tripod's quick release mechanism, and the USB port is easily accessible for transferring recordings to my PC. My lighting isn't very good, which was a big issue for Q3HD, but doesn't seem to be a problem for Q4N. I am very happy with it!
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