Spanish - cocho is car in English

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dory
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by dory » Sat May 20, 2017 4:17 am

I do not know Sanskrit so I cannot vouch for this personally, but I have heard on good authority that European visitors to India got the idea of Indo-European languages because of Sanskrit's resemblance to Greek and Latin.
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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Sat May 20, 2017 7:21 am

Andrew Fryer wrote:For some reason, in the Lovejoy novels by Jonathan Gash (which are highly recommended reading, incidentally), the word pantechnicon is always used. I have no idea why. I always call it a removals van, but perhaps it's regional?
Well Andrew, that just goes to show that it's true - you do learn something new every couple of weeks. That's brilliant. I knew the word "pantechnicon" but always thought it to be a generic name for any medium sized haulage vehicle. A shame that it's no longer a company logo - if ever I open an art/antique furniture emporium it will be back in use.

Joe de V
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Joe de V » Sun May 28, 2017 6:01 pm

glassynails wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 12:09 pm
I discovered that the word cocho in Spanish is car in English. Now I wonder if the English word 'coach' comes from the latin 'cocho'. I also read that the word 'car' comes from the latin 'carrus' which means a 'wheeled vehicle'. Then I noticed that 'carrus' looks like our English word 'carry'. Are all these works related?

Also interesting is the Spanish name for boat is 'barco' which sounds similar to 'barcarola' that some of in cg are familiar with.
To be specific the term cocho is not necessarily a car (an automobile) In Spanish terminology a coche/cocho is a carrier of people that is pulled by a horse or a group of horses. If you remember the old western cowboys movies where the "bad" guys held up the traveling "coches". A car is relatively new in relation to the cocho,ie-coche.
In NYC there are still coches catering to the visitors taking a "ride" on the park and at times on the major centers of commerce.
The Golden Gate Park in San Francisco also have Coches-rides very popular with the turits to that park
The latin term carrus in spoken spanish is carro - rolling your double r's, almost similar to the term car in english

kirolak
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Location: South Africa

Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by kirolak » Sun May 28, 2017 8:17 pm

glassynails wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 12:09 pm
I discovered that the word cocho in Spanish is car in English. Now I wonder if the English word 'coach' comes from the latin 'cocho'. I also read that the word 'car' comes from the latin 'carrus' which means a 'wheeled vehicle'. Then I noticed that 'carrus' looks like our English word 'carry'. Are all these works related?

Also interesting is the Spanish name for boat is 'barco' which sounds similar to 'barcarola' that some of in cg are familiar with.

No, the word is coche. . :)

hpaulj
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Location: Seattle

Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by hpaulj » Tue May 30, 2017 4:14 am

It's somewhat curious that that non-latin wagon (or wain) did not become the common term for automobile. Maybe it's because the lighter, more elegant cart/carriage had better marketing appeal. Still we do have state wagons,

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carriage# ... _carriages is a long list of horse drawn carriage names. They had more time to evolve, where as the 'car' as invented and adopted in a matter of decades.

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