House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

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simonm
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House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by simonm » Wed May 31, 2017 3:22 pm

I will have to do quite a bit of painting this year and next. It will all be simple, mainly white, water based emulsion paint for walls and ceilings. I saw some painters using a powered/pumped roller system recently but cannot find much info.

Can anyone make some recommendations? In particular I am interested in what is available on the EU market. For whatever reason the search engines are mainly throwing up US products and no serious reviews of what is available. Delcampers to the rescue please!

gitgeezer
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by gitgeezer » Wed May 31, 2017 6:38 pm

Wagner seems to be at the top of the market for power rollers. They're based in the U.S. but have a production plant in Switzerland to serve Europe. The founder of the company was born in Germany.

Dirck Nagy
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by Dirck Nagy » Wed May 31, 2017 7:31 pm

I have never used one, but I'm sceptical.

If you are just painting your house, one room at a time, a regular roller does a fine job. Factoring in original cost, set-up and take-down time and cleaning, I don't think there would be any benefit to using a powered roller unless you are painting many rooms at one time with helper(s) to do the cutting-in, and using a large quantity of a single color of paint. (And if that was your task, a sprayer would probably work better anyway)

Please pardon the unsolicited advice, but for a quality job, it is better to spend more of your time on surface preparation (patching, sanding, priming, masking, etc) than actually applying paint. Painting is easy, but this is where many amateur jobs fail. Applying the paint should be the LEAST time-consuming part of the task.

(disclaimer: I HAVE been a professional painter)

have fun!
dirck
2015 John H. Dick
1994 Larry Breslin ("Deerhead")
1952 Vincente Tatay

khayes
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by khayes » Wed May 31, 2017 8:58 pm

I agree with Dirck. It's hard to beat a regular, 'cordless' roller in my opinion. A gallon can be rolled on in short order. Just use a decent quality roller cover with an extension pole. The extension allows even pressure leverage against the wall with less strain on your wrist and arm. I wrap covers in foil between coats and then toss in the trash when done. I also use disposable tray liners. Hardly any cleanup after that.
Ken

simonm
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by simonm » Thu Jun 01, 2017 6:57 pm

I tend to use a large roller on a 2m (6ft) pole for the bulk of the work and a brush and/or a small roller on a long handle for corners and edges. However, if I could speed up the operation I would be willing to spend some money on it. Spraying is a non-starter as it takes a fair bit of skill, protective clothing and a huge effort in masking off areas which you don't want to paint. So the powered roller is the only option apart from manual.

Smith
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by Smith » Fri Jun 02, 2017 3:57 am

As a contractor I've done mostly carpentry but O branches out into painting. Last year I had to buy a sprayer to finish a government contract for which spraying was required. In my 30 odd years in construction I've never heard of anybody using a power roller system professionally. Wagner is a good brand however and they may have come up with something. They have small electric sprayers that are suitable for some jobs. Hotel and property maintenance firms tend to use them from time to time. Spraying is a major pain any way you slice it. Rolling manually is safe and easy--just time consuming. If you get really busy then buy a sprayer later.

I'm constantly amazed at the newest gimmicks to supposedly make painting easier. The brush with the flexible handle (so supposedly you don't have to lift your arm) for example.

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ragdoll serenade
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by ragdoll serenade » Sun Jun 04, 2017 3:38 pm

I'm a professional painter. Many years. I still use a brush and roller for the bulk of my interior work. Do your prep well and do it in an organized fashion so that you won't have to stop and start when you actually start painting.

You will gain very little with a power roller, I never see them in paint stores anymore. If you must use power equipment an airless sprayer is the way to go but there is more knowledge, skill and prep required and lots of pitfalls. I have to have a very good reason to spray. Brush and rolling is still the standard for general interior painting.

Pretty much what the other posters have said.

dory
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by dory » Sun Jun 04, 2017 3:39 pm

I would be leery of a powered roller. Admittedly I have only painted a few rooms, but my feeling is that powered devices take skill to use, and in a normal sized house there isn't enough time to learn to use one. I would also check the price of a house painter against the cost of a powered roller. Sorry to be a luddite, but I use regular rollers on my paint jobs.
Dory

MessyTendon
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Re: House painting - interior. Powered rollers. Experiences?

Post by MessyTendon » Sun Jun 04, 2017 7:14 pm

no...no...no....

By a good roller...for 20-25 dollars. A skin roller, and clean it in between sessions, it will last, hold more paint and won't clog up like cheap rollers. If you can get a partner to cut in with the brush and roll...much smoother to do that way.

But you can cut it in then roll. These power products are mostly garbage.

I have always thought why not just use a a rubber squeege, and roll solid blobs of paint over the surface...if there was some way to make a drip catcher and counter pressurize, a squeegee...you could theoretically collect paint back into the apparatus...

I like to think there has to be a way to have a big pallet knife and just wipe the crap on...Sprayers waste lot's of paint.

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