English language peeves

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Guitar Nut
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English language peeves

Post by Guitar Nut » Fri Aug 11, 2017 3:48 pm

Hmm... Somehow managed a double post and can't delete it. Let's change the subject altogether. What's your biggest peeve when it comes to the English language? What really sets your teeth on edge?

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri Aug 11, 2017 4:54 pm

Isn't the singular of peeves peef?
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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Fri Aug 11, 2017 5:16 pm

Guitar Nut wrote:What really sets your teeth on edge?
There are so many - I really shouldn't begin ...

... just a few to set the ball rolling.

I often hear (and see written) "I would of" instead of "I would have."

I heard an Irish journalist (someone whose occupation one might expect to engender a certain command of words) describe a team of squaddies as patrolling the circumference of their base.

Another Irish one - they (very) often pronounce the letter aitch with an extra aitch at the beginning.

As for to and too ... let's just say that there are to many examples (from native English speakers) too count, right here on this forum.

You can begin tracking down all the grammar and spelling errors in my posts now ...

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tubeman
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Re: English language peeves

Post by tubeman » Fri Aug 11, 2017 5:32 pm

I have so many that I hardly know where to begin. The wrong use of your/you're, its/it's, there/their...anyone over the age of 8 ought to know when to use them! A fairly recent and alarming trend among newscasters is the lack of verbs! They tend to use participles instead: "The FBI opening an investigation into..." Grr... Oooh, another one is laying/lying, as in "The body was found laying in the garage." No, it was lying there. TV crime shows are the frequent perpetrator of that error.
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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Fri Aug 11, 2017 5:55 pm

Probably not restricted to English, but the habit of asking a question then stating the answer (which has been obvious all along); "Do I think we need to make improvements to the NHS? Yes" - rather than. "Yes we need ...blah".

And the use of the word 'multiple' (3 syllables) when 'many' (2) would do fine.
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri Aug 11, 2017 6:14 pm

No mention of the use of 'I' as an object pronoun yet?
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Andrew Pohlman
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Fri Aug 11, 2017 6:17 pm

You mean peeves with the language, or peeves of its usage, or just sloppy typing???

As with any language, the irregular verbs are bothersome. But generally, English is formed from many contributions leading to many ways to says things. I speak some Spanish and German. The sentence in Spanish get really long, and the words in German are often compound so get lengthy as well. English is actually more efficient. And I have been told by my many immigrant colleagues, English is easy to learn.

In terms of usage, people using "then" instead of "than". "Then" is a function of time or consequence. "Than" is a comparison operator.
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Fri Aug 11, 2017 6:27 pm

I just learned that I'm not 'floundering' when I play a new piece; rather my playing is 'foundering'. But I think that this is the establishment of new correct usage of a term, on the basis of common usage determining correctness. My fingers 'flounder' like fish out of water. That's accurate. Language is endlessly inventive, even when people abuse it.
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manythumbed
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Re: English language peeves

Post by manythumbed » Fri Aug 11, 2017 8:57 pm

The use of loose instead of lose!

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Re: English language peeves

Post by randalljazz » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:36 pm

oh, so many!

reversal of the correct usage of "comprise". "english comprises germanic and latin sources", not "english is comprised of germanic ansd latin sources."

otherwise seemingly articulate persons not knowing when to use the objective pronoun. "are you referring to joshua and i?" sigh.

tbc.
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twang
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Re: English language peeves

Post by twang » Fri Aug 11, 2017 10:57 pm

Using "impact" instead of learning the difference between "affect" and "effect".
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Re: English language peeves

Post by tyke » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:01 pm

Mark Clifton-Gaultier wrote:
Fri Aug 11, 2017 5:16 pm
Another Irish one - they (very) often pronounce the letter aitch with an extra aitch at the beginning.
That's quite widespread in England and Wales too. It seems to me that about a generation ago English teachers became 'trendy' and didn't bother so much with 'correct' pronunciation. Amongst the many sins this engendered was aitch being supplanted with haitch. (I see that my spellchecker has put a wavy red line under the latter - HOORAY!) It makes me grind my teeth :evil:

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Re: English language peeves

Post by stevel » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:40 pm

One of my musical peeves is the use of the word "Base" for "Bass".

I had a student turn in a paper on drum machines once and throughout, "cymbal" was spelled "symbol".

Tyke's post above reminds me of an odd one:

There are a few cases where an "H" should be silent, but is pronounced, for example, after "a" versus "an". It usually comes in the form of "an heroic feat".

Or rather, it should be prefaced with "a" rather than "an" depending on your perspective.

One that drives me crazy is with collective nouns.

"Rush are one of the greatest bands in history".

IMHO we should eradicate this archaic nonsense.

Rush IS a BAND.

The MEMBERS of Rush ARE great musicians.

But I constantly see the singular collective noun used with "are" when there's no clear context that they're talking about the individuals making up the unit.

Coca-Cola IS releasing a new flavor next year.

not

Coca-Cola ARE releasing a new flavor next year.

I also don't like traditional quotation usage but we don't need to go there.

OK, it's "centered ON" and "revolves AROUND", not "centered around". While you could make an argument for "centered around" as the meaning does track, "on" is a lot less typing!

I like other peculiarities like those words you rarely hear without part of a phrase or companion word, especially more archaic ones, like "flotsam and jetsam". Rarely do you get one or the other, they usually come together, if used at all.

I don't like how we've eliminated periods in acronyms now. I used to like M.A.S.H.. If you just write "MASH" or "SWAT" in some contexts, their meaning could drastically change.

Man, the flies were terrible yesterday, Oh, also did you hear they had to call out the SWAT team?

I know it's a lot of extra typing (and money to many) but that's actually something I'd like to hold on to.

Of course autocorrect is to blame for many errors now, but clearly our society (if we can call it that) is devolving language at an alarming rate.

People still can't figure out the apostrophe!

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Re: English language peeves

Post by khayes » Fri Aug 11, 2017 11:53 pm

One I hear in the southern US frequently is "I seen ..." instead of "I saw ..."
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Les Backshall
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Les Backshall » Sat Aug 12, 2017 12:23 am

Words with quite different meanings used as synonyms e.g.
anticipate and expect;
disinterested and uninterested.

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