English language peeves

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Mon Aug 28, 2017 8:07 pm

Here's a few snippets from Wikipedia. Actually, I didn't realize that the Academy was still functioning. I don't think of it as good or bad.



the Académie française was "to labor with all the care and diligence possible, to give exact rules to our language, to render it capable of treating the arts and sciences". The Académie française has remained responsible for the regulation of French grammar, spelling, and literature.

Anglicisms[edit]
As the use of English terms by media increased over the years, the Académie has tried to prevent the Anglicization of the French language. For example, the Académie has recommended to avoid loanwords from modern English (such as walkman, computer, software and e-mail), in favour of neologisms, i.e. newly coined French words derived from existing ones (baladeur, ordinateur, logiciel, and courriel respectively, the first three being at present well-established words of the French language).

Alleged conservatism[edit]
The Academy, despite working on the modernization of the French orthography, has sometimes been criticized for allegedly behaving in an overly conservative manner. A recent controversy involved the officialization of feminine equivalents for the names of several professions. For instance, in 1997, Lionel Jospin's government began using the feminine noun "la ministre" to refer to a female minister, following the official practice of Canada, Belgium and Switzerland and a frequent, though until then unofficial, practice in France. The Académie, however, insisted in accordance with French grammar rules on the traditional use of the masculine noun, "le ministre", for a minister of either gender. Use of either form remains highly controversial."


P.s. corneille's Le cid was censured by the Academie...I'm not even sure what that meant (that is, could it still be performed, etc.)
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Andrew Fryer » Mon Aug 28, 2017 8:31 pm

Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:
Mon Aug 28, 2017 8:07 pm
P.s. corneille's Le cid was censured by the Academie...I'm not even sure what that meant (that is, could it still be performed, etc.)
Doesn't worry me - we had the censor, the Lord Chamberlain, the Master of the Revels. Different offices, but they all get their instructions from above.
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Evocacion
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Evocacion » Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:16 am

Still on the subject of adjectives used as nouns, there is currently a TV advertising campaign using the catch-phrase 'Find your happy"'.
That is such an unpleasant phrase it makes me cringe.
English is a very flexible language, but unfortunately that encourages some people to try and bend it until it breaks.

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lagartija
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Re: English language peeves

Post by lagartija » Fri Sep 01, 2017 12:11 pm

Evocacion wrote:
Fri Sep 01, 2017 8:16 am
Still on the subject of adjectives used as nouns, there is currently a TV advertising campaign using the catch-phrase 'Find your happy"'.
That is such an unpleasant phrase it makes me cringe.
English is a very flexible language, but unfortunately that encourages some people to try and bend it until it breaks.
Maybe that came from "find your happy place", and due to restrictions on lengthy (expensive and hard to remember) marketing phrases, was shortened? I don't like it either... :-|
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woodenhand
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Re: English language peeves

Post by woodenhand » Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:00 am

The word "issue" is now so popular that people are desperate to use it, and so it means just about anything people want it to mean. Does that software have a bug? Call it an "issue"! Never say it has a bug or flaw. Don't approve of something or don't like it? Never say it in a straightforward manner. Say "I have an issue with that." Did your car break down? It's Dullsville to say, "My car broke down." You should say, "My car has a mechanical issue." Did a fungus kill your bean plants? Say that "my bean plants have a fungal issue."

As long as I'm at it, let's talk about the grossly overused adjective "massive." Is there anything that is not "massive" these days? "Massive" stands in for a host of other adjectives including, but not limited to, big, expansive, major, broad, huge, extensive, severe, serious, grave, etc. Even journalists and mainstream news services can't resist it, and their articles are littered with massive this and massive that. You'd think that all other adjectives had been banned.

So to summarize, I do not have a "peeve," I have a MASSIVE ISSUE with these words!

hpaulj
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Re: English language peeves

Post by hpaulj » Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:54 am

On open source repositories like Github, issue is a broader term than bugs (though I often use 'bug/issues'. It can be an enhancement request, question, documentation questions. The 'issue' is the request for action, the patch or pull request is a solution.

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri Sep 08, 2017 8:33 am

Our software didn't have bugs, it had features.

We are going from peeves to precision, aren't we.

I too don't like massive. Something that is massive is something that has a lot of mass.

I hate it when someone says gross oversimplification instead of oversimplification.
Something could be a gross oversimplification, but it almost never is - it's usually just said by someone imagining they are rhetorically gifted.
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Rasputin
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Rasputin » Fri Sep 08, 2017 2:42 pm

Some coffee shop peeves:

I think the right approach to foreign names of many foody things is to pronounce them using the nearest English sounds without putting on a silly accent - so a pain au raisin is a pan oh rayzan... but if you say that in a coffee shop, the server will look at you quizzically and say "pan oh raisin?", as though the last word was English. Explaining is not really going to make the situation better...

In Starbucks, grande means medium.

Also, in the event that you have to drink Estrella, is it Es-trel-la or Es-trey-ya? I have to admit, it depends what bar I'm in.

woodenhand
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Re: English language peeves

Post by woodenhand » Sat Sep 09, 2017 12:03 am

"In Starbucks, grande means medium."

Yes, this just burns me up to no end. Why is it now inadmissible to use ordinary words like "small," "medium," "large," and "extra large"? To make matters worse, every chain uses different terms.

Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Sat Sep 09, 2017 12:37 am

"I hate it when someone says gross oversimplification instead of oversimplification."

Yep, that's hyperbole and a half.

In coffee bars I just look the barista in the eye and say, give me a double latte in a medium cup. Lingua franca.
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lagartija
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Re: English language peeves

Post by lagartija » Sat Sep 09, 2017 12:48 am

On rare occasions (usually in an airport) when I order at a Starbucks, I ask for a small coffee. It is not listed on the signboard, but they do have small cups, sometimes hidden from view. This whole thing about supersized servings is ridiculous; whatever happened to moderation? :roll:
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hpaulj
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Re: English language peeves

Post by hpaulj » Sat Sep 09, 2017 2:35 am

woodenhand wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 12:03 am
...Why is it now inadmissible to use ordinary words like "small," "medium," "large," and "extra large"?...
Why don't we use (t,i,m,r,p) for right hand fingering? Why not slow, walking, soft, loud, etc. If music can borrow from Italian, why can't coffee marketing? Espresso, cappuccino, macchiato, etc,

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Re: English language peeves

Post by montana » Sat Sep 09, 2017 4:52 am

Sending semen on a naval exercise when we should be sending seamen.

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: English language peeves

Post by Andrew Fryer » Sat Sep 09, 2017 5:53 am

Recently all I have at Starbucks is a flat white (and a pain aux raisins, warmed up).
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wchymeus
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Re: English language peeves

Post by wchymeus » Sat Sep 09, 2017 6:32 am

Andrew Fryer wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 5:53 am
Recently all I have at Starbucks is a flat white (and a pain aux raisins, warmed up).
you mean a Danish roll?
I'd rather get a "plain butter croissant" why would you not simply say: "croissant"... nope, it has to be plain and buttery... ah yeah, because the only alternative is an almond croissant... wait wait, so "croissant" would be ambiguous, really? [and please, pronounce it the right way: crescent not croissant)
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