American Cuisine

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
Dirck Nagy
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American Cuisine

Post by Dirck Nagy » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:24 pm

This should be an appropriate topic for the Café!

I just commented on the Pizza thread, viewtopic.php?f=42&t=115123, and started thinking about various foods which have arisen from the amalgamation of the United States.

What are foods that people think of as American? Do you think there is an "American Cuisine?"

I have my own ideas, of course, but I'm curious about yours.

cheers!
dirck
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Fryer » Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:31 pm

Well, Americans have certainly adapted and amended things like pizza and moussaka.

Maybe you should read Live and Let Die - there's a rather strange meal in there!
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Andrew Pohlman
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Thu Sep 21, 2017 6:12 pm

There are multiple "cuisines" that are distinctly American.

In the SF Bay Area - we have the Alice Waters' California Cuisine, aka Chez Panisse.
There is South Western cooking which is sort of an Americanization of Mexican cuisine with influences from Texas and Louisiana, etc.
Cajan cooking is a separate category, and oh so yummy!
Some would say the Midwest cooking is an entire genre. I still cook items from this school, although modified with healthier oils. But traditional cheese biscuits and sausage gravy are hard to beat when you are overdue to cardiac sins !
And Fusion, or a blending of different cuisines into something new, is very typical of the SF Bay Area, but I'm sure elsewhere too. People may not think it, but the pizzas offered by California Pizza Kitchen are actually a Fusion cuisine.

But we are spoiled in the SF Bay. Things are getting better when I travel, but the diversity of cuisines in SF is incomparable. Bay Area Fusion is one of the best styles of cooking in SF with so many interesting ideas to draw upon and combine in to new ways to view food!
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gitgeezer
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by gitgeezer » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:25 am

The turkey is American, so can turkey-based recipes, like turkey tetrazzini, be considered a cuisine? And it's exportable. A restaurant opened in London last year that serves only turkey-based dishes. (And no, I'm not confusing it with Turkish cuisine.)

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:39 am

Gotta go with BBQ with each region unique. Ever had Dinosaurs in Syracuse? Oh and New England clam chowda and lobster.
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lagartija
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by lagartija » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:44 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:39 am
..... Oh and New England clam chowda and lobster.
As a matter of fact, that was my dinner tonight as I sit on an island in Maine near Bremen.
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petermc61
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by petermc61 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:07 am

I never really thought to put 'American' and 'cuisine' in the same sentence before. :shock:

:desole:

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lagartija
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by lagartija » Fri Sep 22, 2017 11:01 am

petermc61 wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 10:07 am
I never really thought to put 'American' and 'cuisine' in the same sentence before. :shock:

:desole:
Most of us cook our own meals ( and do not have a steady diet of Kentucky fried chicken, McDonalds burgers, or Dunkin Donuts). Depending on our ethnic background, we may cook mostly in one manner or another, but the Fusion Cuisine mentioned is very common . We call that amalgam of cuisines "American ", just as most people here after one or two generations are mixed, so is the food. In my cooking, I use some of the spice combinations of India, China, Morocco, although I am not from there. But no Indian, Chinese or Moroccan person would mistake my cooking for that of their own country. It is still American in some ways, using the local produce and meats/fish.

How many generations must live together in a region before there is a recognized cuisine? That really is the question here, although you probably did not intend to ask it. :-)

PS: many never thought to put fine wine and California together until a California wine won first prize in a blind test in France. ;-)
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joachim33
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by joachim33 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 12:30 pm

I lived in the US (Upstate NY) for a year of my live. I am quite fond of Cajun style food. I think this is a real cultural achievement America gave to the world.

I am not sure whether or not NY-style Bagels count as American food. But I really like them and here in Europe they never taste as good.

The rest of American food I experienced is better not discussed in my view. Yep, it prevents you from starvation, but that's all there is ...

:desole:

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bear
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by bear » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:01 pm

Dirck Nagy wrote:
Thu Sep 21, 2017 4:24 pm
This should be an appropriate topic for the Café!

I just commented on the Pizza thread, viewtopic.php?f=42&t=115123, and started thinking about various foods which have arisen from the amalgamation of the United States.

What are foods that people think of as American? Do you think there is an "American Cuisine?"

I have my own ideas, of course, but I'm curious about yours.

cheers!
dirck
American Cuisine:oxymoron?

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It's interesting how you can eat the same food outside of the U.S. and it tastes very different (better).
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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:14 pm

petermc61 wrote:I never really thought to put 'American' and 'cuisine' in the same sentence before.
Withetty grubs anyone?

JohnW400
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by JohnW400 » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:29 pm

America is a big place. Lots of different cuisines for each region

New England, know for it's seafood, was already mentioned as well as Cajun. Then there is Southern cuisine, Tex-Mex. BBQ, Steak Houses. then of course there are the new chefs that come out of American culinary schools that go on to open up fancy restaurants that serve dishes thought up by these American Chef's. I think I would call the plates they come with as American Cuisine. Lastly, we have fast food.

I have traveled to England, Wales, Denmark, Sweden and Colombia. I have made a point of sampling two foods in every country I visit. Pizza and Chinese.

I can say that the best Chinese food is in Brooklyn , NY and the best pizza is int the NY-NJ metropolitan area. :) :)

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zupfgeiger
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by zupfgeiger » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:40 pm

joachim33 wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 12:30 pm
I lived in the US (Upstate NY) for a year of my live. I am quite fond of Cajun style food. I think this is a real cultural achievement America gave to the world.

I am not sure whether or not NY-style Bagels count as American food. But I really like them and here in Europe they never taste as good.

The rest of American food I experienced is better not discussed in my view. Yep, it prevents you from starvation, but that's all there is ...

:desole:
Bagels have eastern European-jewish origins, New York pizza was invented in Naples, even Hamburgers are related to Europe, they were first served in NYC to homesick German sailors in the early 19th century. Just for the clam chowder I am not sure.
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:51 pm

Hamburgers may or may not have originated in Hamburg. I won't Google them just now.
Germany is of course famous for the sausages which are everywhere. Hamburgers are not so ubiquitous, unless they are McDonalds.
They have things like Frikadellen. I guess a Hamburger, if not German in myth only, was originally just a flat Frikadelle?
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Andrew Pohlman
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Fri Sep 22, 2017 2:43 pm

Mark Clifton-Gaultier wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:14 pm
petermc61 wrote:I never really thought to put 'American' and 'cuisine' in the same sentence before.
Withetty grubs anyone?
Do you mean "witchetty grubs" ? It is spelled several different ways, including "wijuti", and several other apparently acceptable permutations. They are actually a few different species of moth larvae. Mmmm, nothing says home cooking like wiggety grub pie!

Sorry - not American. Australian, for sure. Had some when visiting my relatives in Perth. Beyond the cootie factor, it's good.
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