American Cuisine

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
Dirck Nagy
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Dirck Nagy » Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:32 pm

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:39 am
...
Gotta go with BBQ with each region unique.
...
Like this? (one of my favorite videos...check out their "Florida Barbecue")

https://youtu.be/6ubTQfr_tyY

cheers!
dirck
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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Fri Sep 22, 2017 5:24 pm

Andrew Pohlman wrote:
Mark Clifton-Gaultier wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:14 pm
petermc61 wrote:I never really thought to put 'American' and 'cuisine' in the same sentence before.
Withetty grubs anyone?
Do you mean "witchetty grubs" ? It is spelled several different ways, including "wijuti", and several other apparently acceptable permutations. They are actually a few different species of moth larvae. Mmmm, nothing says home cooking like wiggety grub pie!
Yes - I mistyped.
Andrew Pohlman wrote:Sorry - not American. Australian, for sure. Had some when visiting my relatives in Perth. Beyond the cootie factor, it's good.
wiggety grub.jpg
wiggety grub pie.jpg
I know that they're an Australian delight having also had the dubious pleasure thanks to relatives ... my comment was aimed squarely at Peter, resident of that fair land and therefore in a precarious position to be questioning the idea of American "cuisine".

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Rick Beauregard
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Rick Beauregard » Fri Sep 22, 2017 6:39 pm

Dirck Nagy wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 4:32 pm
Rick Beauregard wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:39 am
...
Gotta go with BBQ with each region unique.
...
Like this? (one of my favorite videos...check out their "Florida Barbecue")

https://youtu.be/6ubTQfr_tyY

cheers!
dirck
Now THAT'S what am talkin' 'bout! 🤠

(And I'm jes a yankee)
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petermc61
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by petermc61 » Sat Sep 23, 2017 3:15 am

Mark

Australia does have some interesting cuisine. We eat things that walk, hop (wallaby and kangaroo), crawl (crocodile, bugs) and fly. Most Aussies don't eat bugs regularly, we save them for special occassions like when we have overseas visitors. For that occasion they are great fried up and served with dropbear carpaccio.

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Sat Sep 23, 2017 6:50 am

petermc61 wrote:
Sat Sep 23, 2017 3:15 am
Mark
Most Aussies don't eat bugs regularly, we save them for special occassions like when we have overseas visitors.
As I suspected ... of course, we have scouse here which I can only assume was created for that same purpose - probably why you all left in the first place.

Drop bear carpaccio? Truly inspired - though I hear that they're tricky to find. You'll have to use regular koala which will teach the vicious little buggers a lesson and may carry a secondary benefit of keeping a few tourists away.

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BugDog
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by BugDog » Sun Sep 24, 2017 6:58 pm

Potatoes are of American origin as is corn. So would dishes made from either of these be considered American cuisine? Are we talking exclusively North American?

Most of the folks in the USA are descendants of somebody from somewhere else. It doesn't surprise me that so much of "our" cuisine has it's origins somewhere else.

Consider Bourbon whiskey. It's pretty American. The folks that started making that were Scottish and Irish immigrants. But what they had was corn, not rye. And white oak.

Truly "American" cuisine? I'm trying to think of what dishes the early native American Indians ate. I'm drawing a blank.
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Fryer » Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:14 pm

BugDog wrote:
Sun Sep 24, 2017 6:58 pm
I'm trying to think of what dishes the early native American Indians ate. I'm drawing a blank.
They ate sweetcorn (potatoes came form the Andes, I think), but it was the baby stuff - modern giant sweetcorn is something that has been engineered since. I guess it depends where you were. Around the great lakes they would have eaten a lot of fish, I guess. I have read Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs and Steel, but I can't remember the details.
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chiral3
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by chiral3 » Sun Sep 24, 2017 10:05 pm

The best American Cuisine is "New American Cuisine". It's meta, in that it is a pastiche of different cultural influences, but totally unique. It's also totally appropriate given America's history. Some of the best chefs in America's major cities identify as New American.
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lagartija
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by lagartija » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:01 am

Squash, beans, corn, tomatoes, cranberries, blueberries, raspberries, trout, salmon, turkey, buffalo, elk, deer, rabbit, squirrel, etc. there were a lot of things to eat and how they were prepared depended on where you lived. The native New England Indian tribes collected maple sap as a sweetener, ate clams, fresh water and salt water mussels, and lobster.
A lot of things were cooked by boiling and steaming, or were roasted over an open fire or baked in an earthen pit. There were a lot of herbs available as seasoning.

Potatoes were from the Andes as was quinoa. But the Great Lakes tribes collected the seed heads of a grass...Zizania, known as 'wild rice' now.
Andrew Fryer wrote:
Sun Sep 24, 2017 9:14 pm
BugDog wrote:
Sun Sep 24, 2017 6:58 pm
I'm trying to think of what dishes the early native American Indians ate. I'm drawing a blank.
They ate sweetcorn (potatoes came form the Andes, I think), but it was the baby stuff - modern giant sweetcorn is something that has been engineered since. I guess it depends where you were. Around the great lakes they would have eaten a lot of fish, I guess. I have read Jared Diamond's Guns, Germs and Steel, but I can't remember the details.
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Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:24 am

The first English settlers refused to eat lobster unless they were literally starving. And there were tons of lobster available. '"Bloody 'ell! We are not yet reduced to that!"
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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Mon Sep 25, 2017 6:47 am

BugDog wrote:onsider Bourbon whiskey. It's pretty American. The folks that started making that were Scottish and Irish immigrants. But what they had was corn, not rye. And white oak.
Penderyn make a passably good single malt and claimed, in their marketing, that bourbon is based on Welsh recipes. I don't know anything of the history of Welsh distilleries other than that they existed in the middle ages but died out, only to be revived when this company was founded in the 1990s (or thereabouts).

I've no idea of the truth of the matter - sounds far-fetched to me. Who were these mysterious Welsh immigrants that somehow knew the old skills?

Their whisky is reasonable for the price - aromatic and somewhat more subtle than many highland malts - the peated version doesn't stack up against a good Islay though, and the more recent marketing strategies - naming varieties after Bryn Terfel and Dylan Thomas - is silly. Probably not annoying enough to prevent me asking my wife for a bottle of the rich oak single cask for my birthday however.

wchymeus
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by wchymeus » Mon Sep 25, 2017 7:01 am

I'v only had rattle snakes in California...

Anyhow, my summarized view of American cuisine is: take any recipe, traditional or not, from any country, add butter (as much as possible), corn (syrup as well) and sugar if possible, this turns it into an American recipe.
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Fryer » Mon Sep 25, 2017 7:58 am

lagartija wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:01 am
Squash, beans, corn, tomatoes, cranberries, blueberries, raspberries, trout, salmon, turkey, buffalo, elk, deer, rabbit, squirrel, etc.
I thought tomatoes were also from South America.
I read that tomato (tomatl) and potato (no nahuatl word given by wiki) are words from the same language - potato means bitter water and tomato means sweet water, or something like that. Maybe it's the other way around if sweet potatoes (what the Americans call yams) were the original variety. Other words like avocado (ahuacatl) may be similar, although some people think it means testicle.
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lagartija
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by lagartija » Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:43 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 7:58 am
lagartija wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:01 am
Squash, beans, corn, tomatoes, cranberries, blueberries, raspberries, trout, salmon, turkey, buffalo, elk, deer, rabbit, squirrel, etc.
I thought tomatoes were also from South America.
I read that tomato (tomatl) and potato (no nahuatl word given by wiki) are words from the same language - potato means bitter water and tomato means sweet water, or something like that. Maybe it's the other way around if sweet potatoes (what the Americans call yams) were the original variety. Other words like avocado (ahuacatl) may be similar, although some people think it means testicle.
Both tomatoes and potatoes originated in Peru. The potato became a staple of the diet of the Incas and were raised as a crop. The tomato was just collected as a wild berry. The tomatoes were traded North to the territory of the Aztecs, who raised them as crops and created a number of varieties. When the Spaniards came, tomatoes were already established as a crop plant.
So they did originate in South America, but have been grown as a crop in North America (Mexico) for ~1000 years.
Oh, I forgot to include another important food crop...peppers! The aztecs grew those as a crop as well.
Chocolate was also used in beverages and cooking (no sugar added to it...that was a European addition).
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Fryer » Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:47 pm

I'm sure they got them eventually. It's just that Diamond's thesis is that crop and animal domestication worked much faster on the East-West axis than North-South, so it might have been best to keep the conversation to the original North American crops.
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