American Cuisine

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
User avatar
lagartija
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 10106
Joined: Thu Apr 02, 2009 5:37 pm
Location: Western Massachusetts, USA

Re: American Cuisine

Post by lagartija » Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:54 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 12:47 pm
I'm sure they got them eventually. It's just that Diamond's thesis is that crop and animal domestication worked much faster on the East-West axis than North-South, so it might have been best to keep the conversation to the original North American crops.
I'm not familiar with his thesis and why one would ignore the obvious trade routes between groups in South, Central and North America. By the time of Spanish arrival in Florida, there is evidence that the wild tomato was present throughout the entire Gulf of Mexico region and was present in Florida.

Is there a point in time where one draws the line as to what Native Americans ate for dinner?! I would think that anything before conquest is fair game.
When the sun shines, bask.
__/^^^^^o>
Classical Guitar forever!

User avatar
cefyn
Posts: 388
Joined: Sun Aug 04, 2013 1:14 pm
Location: Gwaenysgor, Wales, U.K.

Re: American Cuisine

Post by cefyn » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:14 pm

My American-born wife and I enjoyed some American cuisine yesterday - I made Manhattans as a pre-prandial treat :merci:
1983 Robert Cross Spruce & IRW

User avatar
zupfgeiger
Posts: 1794
Joined: Wed Feb 08, 2012 12:12 pm
Location: Wezembeek-Oppem, Belgium

Re: American Cuisine

Post by zupfgeiger » Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:44 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:51 pm
Hamburgers may or may not have originated in Hamburg. I won't Google them just now.
Germany is of course famous for the sausages which are everywhere. Hamburgers are not so ubiquitous, unless they are McDonalds.
They have things like Frikadellen. I guess a Hamburger, if not German in myth only, was originally just a flat Frikadelle?
As far as I recall the article about origin of Hamburgers, those German sailors came from Hamburg, Andrew. Frikadelle is indeed something similar to a "Hamburger", and yes, I love them from time to time, and my family too as they are home made. :)
The secret of getting ahead is getting started (Mark Twain)

Tobias Braun, Santos copy, spruce/yew, 2017
Andrea Tacchi, Enrique Garcia model, Spruce/BRAZ, 2016
Giovanni Tacchi, Daniel Friederich copy, cedar/EIR, 2017
Alain Raifort, cedar/EIR, 2004

User avatar
Andrew Fryer
Posts: 2461
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 9:13 pm
Location: London SE5

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Fryer » Mon Sep 25, 2017 4:26 pm

zupfgeiger wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 1:44 pm
Andrew Fryer wrote:
Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:51 pm
Hamburgers may or may not have originated in Hamburg. I won't Google them just now.
Germany is of course famous for the sausages which are everywhere. Hamburgers are not so ubiquitous, unless they are McDonalds.
They have things like Frikadellen. I guess a Hamburger, if not German in myth only, was originally just a flat Frikadelle?
As far as I recall the article about origin of Hamburgers, those German sailors came from Hamburg, Andrew. Frikadelle is indeed something similar to a "Hamburger", and yes, I love them from time to time, and my family too as they are home made. :)
Best referred to as rissoles in English. Not to be confused with the things that go together with lips to make a frankfurter.
(lips and fatmeat, if you've only seen the dubbed version of The Great Outdoors)
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

Andrew Pohlman
Posts: 1005
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 8:24 pm
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:48 pm

Nobody mentioned root beer. Root beer is a distinct part of American cuisine! A "Root Beer Float Social" has been akin to a coming out party, at least in my family's history! We tried making root beer from early American recipes: sassafras root and cherry bark were the main ingredients. It was terrible! I'll stick with the factory made versions... :D We did succeed in bottling up root beer made from Hires extract when I was a kid. That and homemade ice cream = American cuisine at it's finest ! :D
2013 Rodriguez FF Sabicas blanco
2015 Trevor Gore custom Neoclassical
- redwood top, Palo dorado B+Ss.

dory
Posts: 1748
Joined: Mon Jun 11, 2012 3:29 am
Location: Madison, Wisconsin, USA

Re: American Cuisine

Post by dory » Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:58 pm

It is interesting because in the US we imagine that food in the UK is mostly inedible which is not true. Probably the same is true of people looking from the outside here. What is complicated is that the US is made up of so many immigrant groups that a lot of things that "look" ethnic are actually native to the US and this doesn't make for a very coherent cuisine, and ethnic dishes differ fromfamily to family. In my family a kind of Christmas pudding made from suet is traditional. (I presently used a recipe with less saturated fat) but I think the idea of Christmas pudding comes originally from the UK and it is not common in very many American families which may have different ethnic dishes they prepare. A lot of the dishes prepared in the less expensive "Chinese" restaurants are quintessentially American. Fortune cookies in particular (most of which are inedible IMO) are absolutely American, and existed no place else in the world for a long time although I think they are spreading internationally. As for the quality of food, although there actually are some goid small diners, mostly if you come as a foreign visitor and want to osy $5 for a meal you will end up with something that tadtes bad and will probably give you indigestion. There sre a lot of good restaurants if you want to spend a bit more. And of course most of us cook at home and being a nation of immigrants we make foods inspired by many parts of the world but with our own touch. For examplebI have heard that a lot of people are making pho at homenalthough I don"t. Hoeevrr one of my home staples is aloo gobi although I have no known ancestors from India.
However, buscuits and gravy which I detest probably because I have had it only once in a bad restaurant, (NOT typical in Wisconsin) and grits which I like ARE typical of the South.
Dory

User avatar
Andrew Fryer
Posts: 2461
Joined: Mon Jan 30, 2012 9:13 pm
Location: London SE5

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Fryer » Wed Sep 27, 2017 11:22 pm

Andrew Pohlman wrote:
Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:48 pm
Nobody mentioned root beer. Root beer is a distinct part of American cuisine!
I like root beer, but the only place I ever saw it was in McDonalds and not for decades in the UK.
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

chiral3
Posts: 1699
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 7:08 pm
Location: Philadelphia Area, PA / New York.

Re: American Cuisine

Post by chiral3 » Wed Sep 27, 2017 11:40 pm

dory wrote:
Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:58 pm
It is interesting because in the US we imagine that food in the UK is mostly inedible which is not true.
Less broadly than the UK, when I think of great food in Britain, I think of great Indian. Spotted dick, clotted cream, etc... not so much.
物の哀れ

MessyTendon
Posts: 1317
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 1:33 am

Re: American Cuisine

Post by MessyTendon » Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:12 am

American food is more or less a bastardization of all the immigrant cultures around. I don't know what American food is. I think post world war 2...we see the advancement of wonder bread and processed junk. That is not American, but Americana garbage.

Perhaps the most American of all American food is BBQ...a big hunk of tough meat, slathered in sugary sauce...That's American...Anything with an excess of sugar, that makes an all American treat...

Acorn mush...that's native American indian cuisine...Good stuff.

Laudiesdad69
Posts: 1184
Joined: Tue Nov 29, 2016 1:16 pm

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Laudiesdad69 » Thu Sep 28, 2017 2:06 am

Chicken and waffles. It doesn't get any more American than that. Oh, and sliders.

Dirck Nagy
Posts: 518
Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2013 4:47 pm
Location: Wisconsin, USA

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Dirck Nagy » Thu Sep 28, 2017 2:14 am

MessyTendon wrote:
Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:12 am
...
Perhaps the most American of all American food is BBQ...a big hunk of tough meat, slathered in sugary sauce...That's American...Anything with an excess of sugar, that makes an all American treat...
...
Blasphemy!
BArbecue rocks!

https://youtu.be/6ubTQfr_tyY

cheers
dirck
2015 John H. Dick
1994 Larry Breslin ("Deerhead")
1952 Vincente Tatay

Jeffrey Armbruster
Posts: 1528
Joined: Fri Dec 27, 2013 3:16 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Thu Sep 28, 2017 2:20 am

MessyTendon wrote:
Thu Sep 28, 2017 1:12 am
American food is more or less a bastardization of all the immigrant cultures around. I don't know what American food is. I think post world war 2...we see the advancement of wonder bread and processed junk. That is not American, but Americana garbage.

Perhaps the most American of all American food is BBQ...a big hunk of tough meat, slathered in sugary sauce...That's American...Anything with an excess of sugar, that makes an all American treat..


My home town is known for California Cuisine--Alice Waters and Chez Panisse. This has been influential nationally for decades. It emphasizes fresh seasonal ingredients and good farm practices. The last I checked California was part of the Americas. When Obama was president Waters came to the White House and instituted a gardening project. MIchelle advocated her ideas for school lunches. This cuisine is a reaction to processed junk food--but again, it's decades old. Old stereotypes die hard I guess.

Of course, the Bay Area is home to hundreds of ethnic restaurants--it that term even makes sense. Everything influences everything. Or, you can find traditional regional cuisines--old style country French restaurants, for example.

So, yeah, the states aren't all about jello and donuts and slabs of meat.
Paul Weaver spruce 2014
Takamine C132S

Andrew Pohlman
Posts: 1005
Joined: Tue Nov 10, 2015 8:24 pm
Location: SF Bay Area

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Andrew Pohlman » Thu Sep 28, 2017 3:17 pm

Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:
Thu Sep 28, 2017 2:20 am
My home town is known for California Cuisine--Alice Waters and Chez Panisse. This has been influential nationally for decades. It emphasizes fresh seasonal ingredients and good farm practices. The last I checked California was part of the Americas. ... So, yeah, the states aren't all about jello and donuts and slabs of meat.
I mentioned Alice Waters in a post above. California cuisine is fantastic and changed cooking in the SF Bay Area radically.

Not so much in Boron California. Yes, that's actually a city, and you can guess what they mine there! :D My experiences in Boron relates to what Jeffrey said and brings up yet another form of American cuisine - truck driver food! My son and I were traveling to the Lucerne Dry Lake Bed and stopped at a truck driver cafe in Boron. I ordered pancakes, and requested non fat milk. The waitress said, "We don't have that." So I changed my request to low fat milk. She put her hands on her hips, tilted her head to the side and said, "Honey, we have milk. Do you want that or don't you?" So much for dissemination of California Cuisine out of the Bay Area! Bring on the truck driver cuisine! :D
2013 Rodriguez FF Sabicas blanco
2015 Trevor Gore custom Neoclassical
- redwood top, Palo dorado B+Ss.

Jeffrey Armbruster
Posts: 1528
Joined: Fri Dec 27, 2013 3:16 am
Location: Berkeley, California

Re: American Cuisine

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:05 pm

Andrew, you were one Jack Nicholson away from replicating a scene in Five Easy Pieces...
Paul Weaver spruce 2014
Takamine C132S

montana
Posts: 1351
Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2008 8:46 pm

Re: American Cuisine

Post by montana » Fri Sep 29, 2017 5:59 am

Andrew Pohlman wrote:
Wed Sep 27, 2017 9:48 pm
Nobody mentioned root beer. Root beer is a distinct part of American cuisine! A "Root Beer Float Social" has been akin to a coming out party, at least in my family's history! We tried making root beer from early American recipes: sassafras root and cherry bark were the main ingredients. It was terrible! I'll stick with the factory made versions... :D We did succeed in bottling up root beer made from Hires extract when I was a kid. That and homemade ice cream = American cuisine at it's finest ! :D
Andrew . ....you needed to add 15 cowboy boots of sugar. That's the American way! :merci:

Return to “The Café”