Classical Guitar on the Stage...how do we compare?

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
Rognvald
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Re: Classical Guitar on the Stage...how do we compare?

Post by Rognvald » Wed Oct 04, 2017 9:35 pm

Charles, here's some feedback in re: your post. I heard Segovia play live in Miami in the Seventies. He walked on the stage . . . waited for complete silence and played the entire concert without amplification. The crowd, as well as I, was spellbound after his sensitive, moving performance. He bowed politely and walked off the stage. . . Also during the Seventies, I interviewed Von Freeman--one of Jazz's great tenor saxophonists before a jam session at the Enterprise Lounge in Chicago. The next day, I dropped off a big band arrangement I had written to a Jazz trumpet friend of mine and remarked that Von played an outstanding performance but that I was disappointed with his lack of anything really profound to say in the interview. He turned to me in anger and said, "He's not a philosopher . . .he's a musician." . . . I took my brother to see Pepper Adams(Jazz baritone Player) at Joe Seagal's Jazz Showcase in Chicago. My brother commented how "square" he looked and reminded him of a "Walter Mitty." Eight bars into the performance, he ate his words as Pepper "burned the house down" with his consummate artistry. . . and finally, I went to a CG concert recently to see an "artist"(name withheld) who was a real Chatty Cathy on the stage. His attire was immaculate, the sound system superb, his technique flawless, his presence ethereal(how do you like that one Charles?) and he played with the emotion of an Aardvark. I left at halftime(sorry for the football analogy) and went home to work on some pieces. The point is, Charles . . . NOTHING MATTERS BUT THE MUSIC. Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

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Charles Mokotoff
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Re: Classical Guitar on the Stage...how do we compare?

Post by Charles Mokotoff » Thu Oct 05, 2017 1:24 pm

I hear ya!

But I'd say it would have to take some brilliant playing to overcome tripping over the footstool (or some similar gaff) right outta the gate though... :)

Thanks for the pithy comments... ;)

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Peter Lovett
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Re: Classical Guitar on the Stage...how do we compare?

Post by Peter Lovett » Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:10 pm

There is a blog by Stephen Aron who teaches at Oberlin College. He devoted 3 or 4 blogs to the whole question of stage deportment; from dress to deportment to presentation. If you want to be a professional player then the performance starts long before going on stage. Anything else is an insult to your audience.
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Charles Mokotoff
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Re: Classical Guitar on the Stage...how do we compare?

Post by Charles Mokotoff » Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:28 am

Peter Lovett wrote:
Fri Oct 13, 2017 1:10 pm
There is a blog by Stephen Aron who teaches at Oberlin College. He devoted 3 or 4 blogs to the whole question of stage deportment; from dress to deportment to presentation. If you want to be a professional player then the performance starts long before going on stage. Anything else is an insult to your audience.
Totally agree, and I recall reading Stephen's blog, should be required of all aspiring pros.

Dofpic
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Re: Classical Guitar on the Stage...how do we compare?

Post by Dofpic » Thu Oct 19, 2017 3:24 am

As my former teacher 30+ years ago I totally agree!
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