Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
granadina
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby granadina » Tue Apr 26, 2016 8:03 pm

Denian Arcoleo wrote:Music?


music becomes MUSIC ,
when we write M .. U .. S .. I .. C
OR , utter the word !

Until then , it is .. who knows !
Some nameless familiar stimuli ?

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Vito Simplicio » Tue May 03, 2016 1:45 pm

decorous \DECK-er-us\

Definition

Adjective: marked by propriety and good taste : correct

Example

Before making her daily announcements, the principal mentioned how proud she was of the students' decorous conduct at their prom.

Did You Know?

The current meaning of decorous dates from the mid-17th century. One of the word's earliest recorded uses appears in a book titled The Rules of Civility (1673): "It is not decorous to look in the Glass, to comb, brush, or do any thing of that nature to ourselves, whilst the said person be in the Room." Decorous for a time had another meaning as well—"fitting or appropriate"—but that now-obsolete sense seems to have existed for only a few decades in the 17th century. Decorous derives from the Latin word decorus, an adjective created from the noun decor, meaning "beauty" or "grace." Decor is akin to the Latin verb decēre ("to be fitting"), which is the source of our adjective decent. It is only fitting, then, that decent can be a synonym of decorous.

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Vito Simplicio » Thu Jun 09, 2016 2:20 pm

ululate

Verb | ULL-yuh-layt

Definition : howl, wail

Did You Know?

"When other birds are still, the screech owls take up the strain, like mourning women their ancient u-lu-lu." When Henry David Thoreau used "u-lu-lu" to imitate the cry of screech owls and mourning women in that particular passage from Walden, he was re-enacting the etymology of ululate (a word he likely knew). Ululate descends from the Latin verb ululare. That Latin root carried the same meaning as our modern English word, and it likely originated in the echoes of the rhythmic wailing sound associated with it. Even today, ululate often refers to ritualistic or expressive wailing performed at times of mourning or celebration or used to show approval.

Examples of ULULATE

"Millions of pop culture devotees weep and ululate over the death of David Bowie. His passing is noteworthy, given his significant celebrity profile, but I shall miss [journalist] George Jonas' contributions more."
— Randall Bell, letter in The National Post (Canada), 13 Jan. 2016

"They talked loud in their language, and together they sounded like mourners ululating."
— Sefi Atta, Everything Good Will Come, 2005 (2008)

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Andrew Fryer » Fri Jun 10, 2016 6:22 am

Randall Bell sounds like an idiot.
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby derekmcdm » Fri Jun 10, 2016 8:35 am

There's a famous restaurant in Glasgow called THE UBIQUITOUS CHIP

(PS "chip" on this side of the Atlantic means Fries/French Fries)

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Vito Simplicio » Mon Jun 13, 2016 11:25 am

Quaff

verb | KWAHF

Definition: to drink deeply

Did You Know?

Nowadays, quaff has an old-fashioned, literary sound to it. For more contemporary words that suggest drinking a lot of something, especially in big gulps and in large quantity, you might try drain, pound, or slug. If you are a daintier drinker, you might say that you prefer to sip, imbibe or partake in the beverage of your choice. Quaff is by no means the oldest of these terms—earliest evidence of it in use is from the early 1500s, whereas sip dates to the 14th century—but it is the only one with the mysterious "origin unknown" etymology.

Examples of QUAFF

The kids thoroughly enjoyed running a lemonade stand for the day, and weren't bothered in the least by the paltry profits that always result when the proprietors quaff most of the product.

"Contrary to the time-honored campaign tradition of stopping at a local pub to quaff Budweiser with the after-work crowd, this cycle's candidates have gravitated toward local beer makers."
— Matthew Osgood, The Atlantic, 8 May 2016

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Vito Simplicio » Sun Jun 19, 2016 10:22 pm

dolorous

Adjective | DOH-luh-rus

Definition : causing, marked by, or expressing misery or grief

Did You Know?

"No medicine may prevail … till the same dolorous tooth be … plucked up by the roots." When dolorous first appeared around 1400, it was linked to physical pain—and appropriately so, since the word is a descendant of the Latin word dolor, meaning "pain" as well as "grief." (Today, dolor is also an English word meaning "sorrow.") When the British surgeon John Banister wrote the above quotation in 1578, dolorous could mean either "causing pain" or "distressful, sorrowful." "The death of the earl [was] dolorous to all Englishmen," the English historian Edward Hall had written a few decades earlier. The "causing pain" sense of dolorous coexisted with the "sorrowful" sense for centuries, but nowadays its use is rare.

Examples of DOLOROUS

With his dolorous songs about hard-bitten people down on their luck, Johnny Cash garnered legions of fans across generations.

"I felt myself sinking now and then into a dolorous state in which I allowed myself to succumb to a deep despair about life here…."
— Alan Cheuse, Song of Slaves in the Desert, 2011

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Vito Simplicio » Thu Aug 04, 2016 12:42 pm

edify

Verb | ED-uh-fye

Definition: to instruct and improve especially in moral and religious knowledge : uplift; also : enlighten, inform

Did You Know?

The Latin noun aedes, meaning "house" or "temple," is the root of aedificare, a verb meaning "to erect a house." Generations of speakers built on that meaning, and by the Late Latin period, the verb had gained the figurative sense of "to instruct or improve spiritually." The word eventually passed through Anglo-French before Middle English speakers adopted it as edify during the 14th century. Two of its early meanings, "to build" and "to establish," are now considered archaic; the only current sense of edify is essentially the same as that figurative meaning in Late Latin, "to instruct and improve in moral and religious knowledge."

Examples of EDIFY

"Reading Lawrence, I am amazed and edified by the raw emotional intensity of his characters. I’m looking for ways to internalize this rich, untamed emotion and try to impart something of it to the characters who come to life in my keyboard."
— A. B. Yehoshua, quoted in The New York Times Book Review, 16 June 2016

"He said he hopes the group takes away the community they began to build, so they can unify and edify each other to do the work of recovery."
— Taylor Stuck, The Herald-Dispatch (Huntington, West Virginia), 15 May 2016

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby tubeman » Thu Aug 04, 2016 6:12 pm

peruse
pəˈro͞oz
verb formal
read (something), typically in a thorough or careful way.
"He has spent countless hours in libraries perusing art history books and catalogues"
examine carefully or at length.
"Laura perused a Caravaggio"

Many people misuse the word as if it means to skim quickly!
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Vito Simplicio » Fri Aug 05, 2016 12:42 pm

Good word, tubeman. I was one of those people who thought that it meant to read quickly, to scan. Perhaps because the meaning of the word doesn't match the sound. Another word that doesn't sound like what it means is sublime: of such excellence, grandeur, or beauty as to inspire great admiration or awe.
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby tubeman » Wed Aug 10, 2016 8:07 pm

I learned a new one yesterday from NPR, pseudocide: the act of faking one's death. (Often to escape money owed to people, insurance scams, etc.)
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Andrew Fryer » Thu Aug 11, 2016 11:38 am

For the Americans on this forum I'd like to offer up the word "brooch". I assume in America it is called a pin?
I offer it up because John Hillerman has to say it in an episode of Magnum PI, and he pronounces it to rhyme with pooch, demonstrating that he is not English, although he does a very good act. It is pronounced to rhyme with coach. In fact brooch and broach are homophones. Thankyou.
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby gitgeezer » Thu Aug 11, 2016 3:17 pm

"Brooch" also rhymes with "coach" most of the time in America. I always felt that those who rhyme it with "pooch" are perhaps not familiar with the word and are simply trying to pronounce it as it is spelled. However, William Safire, in a 1998 New York Times article, had a different take:

"The story begins with the Middle English word broche, from the Latin brocca, spike, ''with the o pronounced as in Oh, yeah? ''As a noun, broche meant a tapering pointed instrument, ''like a spear, a bodkin or a spit on which to roast meat, and centuries later, a chisel used by masons or a pick used by dentists. That meaning exists today in the French en brochette, with the skewer sticking through chunks of meat and onion and tomato. (Don't try to get it off with your fork or you'll splatter the bed of rice all over the table; let the waiter do it.)

"As a verb, to broach carried forward that meaning of turning. Ships broach to when they turn broadside to wind or waves and thereby risk capsizing. Vintners tap a cask by broaching it, or enlarging a hole with a boring-bit also called a broach. That digging into ''sense led to the current major meaning, to introduce, to give vent to, to utter, ''which is why we have been able to broach this subject today.

"While this was happening to the verb, the noun rooted in broche was developing in the jewelry business. Send hire letters, tokens, brooches, rynges, ''advised Chaucer's narrator in 1385, in ''The Legend of Good Women,'' possibly against his amanuensis' better judgment, with the brooch denoting a pin (the original spike) attached to an ornament or jewel to form a clasp. Today, it is often synonymous with pin, ''but retains a special meaning of an ornamental device intended to clasp two garments, or sections of a garment, together -- or at least seeming to.

"Note the way the word broke into two spellings: the verb broach, meaning to open up, introduce, address, ''and the noun brooch, meaning an ornamental pin sticking through a garment.''

"To me, that spelling split is a signal to pronounce the verb broach to rhyme with coach, and to pronounce the noun brooch to rhyme with pooch. (Nice dog, Buddy.)

"Many respected dictionaries do not agree with me on this. They hold fast to the oach ''pronunciation for both verb and noun. Be patient; they'll catch up."

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Steve Kutzer » Thu Aug 11, 2016 7:53 pm

I've never heard anyone mispronounce brooch. I've never had anyone even broach the subject.
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Postby Hans W » Fri Aug 26, 2016 11:56 pm

gitgeezer wrote:"Brooch" also rhymes with "coach" most of the time in America.
"To me, that spelling split is a signal to pronounce the verb broach to rhyme with coach, and to pronounce the noun brooch to rhyme with pooch. (Nice dog, Buddy.)

Now that was an interesting and enjoyable post to read.

Thanks gitgeezer.

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