Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

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Vito Simplicio
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Post by Vito Simplicio » Mon Jul 31, 2017 4:26 pm

plausible

adjective | PLAW-zuh-bul

Definition

1 : seemingly fair, reasonable, or valuable but often not so
2 : superficially pleasing or persuasive
3 : appearing worthy of belief

Did You Know?

Today the word plausible usually means "reasonable" or "believable," but it once held the meanings "worthy of being applauded" and "approving." It comes to us from the Latin adjective plausibilis ("worthy of applause"), which in turn derives from the verb plaudere, meaning "to applaud or clap." Other plaudere descendants in English include applaud, plaudit (the earliest meaning of which was "a round of applause"), and explode (from Latin explodere, meaning "to drive off the stage by clapping").

Examples of PLAUSIBLE

One problem with the horror movie is that the plot is barely plausible—there was no good reason for the kids to enter the abandoned mansion to begin with.

"Legends of giant squid attacking vessels on the open ocean are great nightmare fuel, even if they never truly occurred. But the sight of a real-life giant squid wrapping its tentacles around a man’s paddleboard, as seen in a recent video ..., makes those old myths certainly seem plausible."
— Eric Grundhauser, Atlas Obscura, 20 June 2017

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gitgeezer
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Post by gitgeezer » Mon Jul 31, 2017 5:16 pm

"probable" - A child runs into the house and shouts, "mommy, mommy, there's a squirrel in the tree in the backyard." Mom has seen squirrels in that same tree, so accepts it as "probable."

"possible" - A child runs into the house and shouts, "mommy, mommy, there's a barn owl in the tree in the backyard." Mom isn't sure her child knows what a barn owl looks like, but thinks it's "possible."

"plausible" - A child runs into the house and shouts, "mommy, mommy, there's a bear in the tree in the backyard." Mom has never seen a bear in her neighborhood, but has heard of bears coming into other neighborhoods, so thinks it "plausible" and that she'd better check just to be sure.

"implausible" - A child runs into the house and shouts, "mommy, mommy, there's a man playing a classical guitar in the tree in the backyard." Mom knows that this is "implausible" but checks anyway just in case some Delcampian is running loose in the neighborhood.

"impossible" - A child runs into the house and shouts, "mommy, mommy, there's a leprechaun in the tree in the backyard." Mom knows immediately that this is "impossible" but checks anyway just to determine what the child did see, if anything.

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Post by musicstand » Fri Aug 04, 2017 1:24 am

Hello gitgeezer,
"impossible" - A child runs into the house and shouts, "mommy, mommy, there's a leprechaun in the tree in the backyard." Mom knows immediately that this is "impossible" but checks anyway just to determine what the child did see, if anything.
'Tis a gifted child she has. There are very few of us who are blessed. I was talkin' to one of the wee folk this afternoon at the wake for McTavish. They buried him today. He lived the life of Reilly while Reilly was away.

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Fri Aug 04, 2017 1:47 am

"Today the word plausible usually means "reasonable" or "believable," but it once held the meanings "worthy of being applauded" and "approving." It comes to us from the Latin adjective plausibilis ("worthy of applause")"

I'll remember to tell my teacher that.
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Mickmac
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Post by Mickmac » Fri Aug 04, 2017 12:34 pm

popcorning

noun.

One of the ways a guinea pig shows his/her excitment/affection. Basically they jump around in little hops and twists. Like popcorn when its cooking.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.p ... Popcorning

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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri Aug 04, 2017 12:48 pm

ANILE

is the female equivalent of SENILE.

But we pronounce both of them wrong - it should be sennile, not seenile; and it should be annile, not as in anal.
Senex (pronounced sennex) is Latin for old man; anus (pronounced annus) is Latin for old woman.
Hence Schopenhauer's "obit anus, abit onus" (the old woman is dead, the burden is gone - he had to pay his landlady a lifetime annuity for kicking her downstairs and maiming her)

There are also Latin verbs senere (be an old man) and anere (be an old woman), but anere is only used once, in Plautus, and does not feature in many Latin lexica at all (neither Lewis and Short, nor Glare, for example).
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Re: Word of the Day and the Use of the English Language

Post by Vito Simplicio » Mon Aug 21, 2017 8:18 am

waif

noun | WAYF

Definition

1: a) a piece of property found (as washed up by the sea) but unclaimed, b) (plural) stolen goods thrown away by a thief in flight

2: a) something found without an owner and especially by chance, b) a stray person or animal; especially : a homeless child

3: an extremely thin and usually young woman

Did You Know?

Waif itself is a stray, if we consider its first meaning the home from which it came. Tracing back to an Anglo-French adjective waif meaning "stray, unclaimed," the English noun waif referred in its earliest 14th century uses to unclaimed found items, such as those gone astray (think cattle) and those washed ashore (think jetsam), as well as to the king's (or lord's) right to such property. Stolen goods abandoned by a thief in flight eventually came to be referred to as waifs as well, as later did anything found without an owner and especially by chance. (It's interesting to note that the verb waive, used in modern English in phrases like "waive a fee" or "waive one's rights" comes from the same Anglo-French source as waif and was at one time used to mean "to throw away (stolen goods).") The emphasis on being found faded as waif came to be applied to any stray animal or person, and especially to a homeless child, and in the late 20th century the current most common meaning of "an extremely thin and usually young woman" developed.

Examples of WAIF

At the center of the novel is a parentless waif who is befriended by the first mate of a ship she is hiding aboard.

"Parker, playing a souped-up version of her trademark crazy-eyed waif, reprises her role as Georgie Burns, a character whose lack of a filter suggests a personality disorder in search of a diagnosis."
— Charles McNulty, The Los Angeles Times, 7 July 2017

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