Neologisms you hate

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
User avatar
Mark Featherstone
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue May 27, 2014 12:26 pm
Location: Singapore

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Mark Featherstone » Sun Jul 19, 2015 10:36 pm

One I used to hear a lot in the office (before retirement): "Long story short..."

Haha. I like that, actually. Succinct.
Francisco Navarro Concert Classical, cedar top, 630 mm scale, 50 mm nut

"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse."
Bruce Cockburn

User avatar
Mark Featherstone
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue May 27, 2014 12:26 pm
Location: Singapore

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Mark Featherstone » Sun Jul 19, 2015 10:39 pm

FauxFox wrote:Fairly common use of the word 'right' in northern England too.

However, on the western side of the hills that roughly divide the North it's pronounced 'reet' and on the eastern side as 'raht'.

They also have an amusing way with past tense verbs in this (north western) corner of the country with gems such as 'tret' for treated and 'frit' for frightened.
Thanks FauxFox and RoryJohn. Interesting to hear about this. I'd be interested in your take on the accent in Newfoundland. Sounds vaguely Irish, and reflects the origins of the people there.
Francisco Navarro Concert Classical, cedar top, 630 mm scale, 50 mm nut

"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse."
Bruce Cockburn

simonm
Amateur luthier
Posts: 6174
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2009 10:22 am
Location: Germany, Kronberg (near Frankfurt).

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by simonm » Fri Jul 31, 2015 8:28 pm

Mark Featherstone wrote:... I'd be interested in your take on the accent in Newfoundland. Sounds vaguely Irish, and reflects the origins of the people there.
The only Newfies I have met sounded almost like caricatures of Irish accents. Very Oirish but with occasional other traits. They blend in in Ireland in no time.

User avatar
Mark Featherstone
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue May 27, 2014 12:26 pm
Location: Singapore

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Mark Featherstone » Sat Aug 01, 2015 1:31 am

Haha, nice to hear the term "Newfie" again. Don't hear it so much in Singapore!
Francisco Navarro Concert Classical, cedar top, 630 mm scale, 50 mm nut

"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse."
Bruce Cockburn

User avatar
JamesMessick
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 209
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2015 5:55 pm
Location: Kernersville, NC

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by JamesMessick » Sat Aug 01, 2015 3:43 am

dory wrote:I just noticed a strong sentiment against the word "gifted" (or "to gift") on the death metal thread. Having a background in linguistics I am aware that language changes constantly, but I also cringe when I hear gift used as a verb. Another neologism I cirdially dislike is the word "symbology." I would like to know what is wrong with the word "symbolism," and who gave the author Dan Brown, who is too violent for my tastes anyway, the power to chane the English language. Are there any neologisms that the rest of you live to hate?
I know this isn't the freshest thread, but have only just come across it. I don't think "gifted" is a very recent addition to our vocabulary.
Play beautifully, insofar as you are able.
Yamaha G-235 II, Fender Stratocaster, Alvarez 5212
Yamaha G-230, Bessler (Guitar Shaped Object)
Cordoba C5-CE
Student of Douglas Niedt

User avatar
Evocacion
Posts: 648
Joined: Mon Sep 30, 2013 10:25 pm
Location: Cambridge, UK

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Evocacion » Sat Aug 01, 2015 1:07 pm

JamesMessick wrote:
I know this isn't the freshest thread, but have only just come across it. I don't think "gifted" is a very recent addition to our vocabulary.
It is definitely NOT an addition my MY vocabulary!

simonm
Amateur luthier
Posts: 6174
Joined: Sat Jun 27, 2009 10:22 am
Location: Germany, Kronberg (near Frankfurt).

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by simonm » Mon Aug 03, 2015 9:26 am

"Gifted" in my part of the world generally means "exceptionally talented".

RoryJohn
Posts: 667
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2015 11:49 pm
Location: (Ireland)

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RoryJohn » Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:16 am

Mark Featherstone wrote: Thanks FauxFox and RoryJohn. Interesting to hear about this. I'd be interested in your take on the accent in Newfoundland. Sounds vaguely Irish, and reflects the origins of the people there.
As far as I know there is a fairly strong history of Irish and Scottish migration on the Atlantic seaboard of Canada, which probably accounts for the similar accent. Newfoundland (as well as Nova Scotia) is a part of the world I have a strong desire to visit; seems like a really beautiful part of the world.
The horse, he kept running; the rider was bread.

RustyFingers

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RustyFingers » Mon Aug 03, 2015 10:22 am

simonm wrote:"Gifted" in my part of the world generally means "exceptionally talented".
In my part of the world it means "simpleton".

User avatar
Mark Featherstone
Posts: 506
Joined: Tue May 27, 2014 12:26 pm
Location: Singapore

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Mark Featherstone » Mon Aug 03, 2015 12:29 pm

RoryJohn wrote:
Mark Featherstone wrote: Thanks FauxFox and RoryJohn. Interesting to hear about this. I'd be interested in your take on the accent in Newfoundland. Sounds vaguely Irish, and reflects the origins of the people there.
As far as I know there is a fairly strong history of Irish and Scottish migration on the Atlantic seaboard of Canada, which probably accounts for the similar accent. Newfoundland (as well as Nova Scotia) is a part of the world I have a strong desire to visit; seems like a really beautiful part of the world.
Nova Scotia (esp Cape Breton) and Newfoundland are indeed beautiful, though I am a little hesitant to say so to you, given the tremendous beauty of parts of the UK and Ireland. Yes, the Irish made a great living fishing and hiding from the British patrols along the Newfoundland coast, and of course many of them stayed.
Francisco Navarro Concert Classical, cedar top, 630 mm scale, 50 mm nut

"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse."
Bruce Cockburn

MessyTendon
Posts: 1211
Joined: Fri Jun 19, 2015 1:33 am

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by MessyTendon » Mon Aug 03, 2015 7:05 pm

Jazz...what is it?

User avatar
Evocacion
Posts: 648
Joined: Mon Sep 30, 2013 10:25 pm
Location: Cambridge, UK

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Evocacion » Tue Aug 04, 2015 3:18 pm

MessyTendon wrote:Jazz...what is it?
I think it's a jack-rabbit: http://alturl.com/ku3vx
.

RoryJohn
Posts: 667
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2015 11:49 pm
Location: (Ireland)

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RoryJohn » Tue Aug 04, 2015 3:52 pm

Heard a lady on the telly-box abbreviate "Categories" to "Cats" a couple nights back...nah, not going to happen missus.
The horse, he kept running; the rider was bread.

RustyFingers

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RustyFingers » Tue Aug 04, 2015 3:52 pm

That particular instance of the present continuous (to be X-ing) replacing the simple present (to X) is down to the perennially awful McDonalds.
And 'simples' is down to those godforsaken Meerkat adverts.

All these things will be replaced eventually though. I remember a time when people would say "heeeey" in a dreary attempt to imitate the Hoffmeister bear: That unfortunate craze died some years ago, thankfully.

On my current avoidance list is the phrase "end of" as an abbreviation of the phrase "end of story" in order to make an emphatic point that one considers a clearly open and entirely debatable matter closed.
Also the current fad for people to "learn lessons". It's not the learning I object to, but the fact that it only happens in conjunction with lessons.
Also 'leverage' as a noun, as in "we need to leverage our capital". Leverage is force applied using a lever. You don't leverage something, you lever it and in doing so you apply leverage.

Here endeth the lesson.

RoryJohn
Posts: 667
Joined: Tue Jan 20, 2015 11:49 pm
Location: (Ireland)

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RoryJohn » Wed Aug 05, 2015 8:43 am

RustyFingers wrote:
On my current avoidance list is the phrase "end of" as an abbreviation of the phrase "end of story" in order to make an emphatic point that one considers a clearly open and entirely debatable matter closed.
Also the current fad for people to "learn lessons". It's not the learning I object to, but the fact that it only happens in conjunction with lessons.
Also 'leverage' as a noun, as in "we need to leverage our capital". Leverage is force applied using a lever. You don't leverage something, you lever it and in doing so you apply leverage.

Here endeth the lesson.
"End of" is a peach of a specimen alright. Its bizarre that an unfinished statement such as it is used to draw a line under something (see what i did? I'm truly horrid.)

Also, I'm sure it was just a momentary lapse of concentration on your part but I think your grievance is with using "leverage" as a verb (as in your example) and not as a noun. At the risk of coming across as a bit of a braying ass, I think you'll agree it would've been remiss of me to lever it out...
The horse, he kept running; the rider was bread.

Return to “The Café”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot], guitarrista, JohnyZuper, manythumbed, rojarosguitar, tosunpasa and 5 guests