Neologisms you hate

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
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Mick the Ramirez Man
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Mick the Ramirez Man » Wed Aug 05, 2015 9:29 am

Yeah, some I hate (resisting the urge :twisted: ), some I find amusing, but most I try to ignore and realize they're just evolving figures of speech. :sage:
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simonm
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by simonm » Wed Aug 05, 2015 9:41 am

End of. I'm lovin' it.

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Andrew Fryer » Wed Aug 05, 2015 11:36 am

In Britain nowadays, the word "all" has acquired the meaning "some" or "all, except for the exceptions, obviously, idiot!".
If you are interested in politics, you'll know what I'm talking about. If not, don't expect me to explain!
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

RustyFingers

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RustyFingers » Wed Aug 05, 2015 11:46 am

RoryJohn wrote:Also, I'm sure it was just a momentary lapse of concentration on your part but I think your grievance is with using "leverage" as a verb (as in your example) and not as a noun. At the risk of coming across as a bit of a braying ass, I think you'll agree it would've been remiss of me to lever it out...
No, you're right.
Those who live by the sword ...
Are lovin' it.
End of.

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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RustyFingers » Wed Aug 05, 2015 11:48 am

Andrew Fryer wrote:In Britain nowadays, the word "all" has acquired the meaning "some" or "all, except for the exceptions, obviously, idiot!".
If you are interested in politics, you'll know what I'm talking about. If not, don't expect me to explain!
There's also that ubiquitous phrase "I have always". It currently means "I haven't always - because at some point I was an infant so this literally can't be true - but it's my current view and I'm trying to make it appear as if I made my mind up about this a long time ago (when in fact it was probably just yesterday) and haven't changed my mind since so that I look as if I'm considerably more decisive than I actually am"

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Denian Arcoleo
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Denian Arcoleo » Wed Aug 05, 2015 12:03 pm

"Anything's possible."

err, no it ain't

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Andrew Fryer » Wed Aug 05, 2015 12:29 pm

There's an advert that claims (I can't remember the product) "up to 100% effective"
Surely it would be more impressive (but no less true) if they said "up to 110% effective"

And a while ago there was an advert that claimed "87% of 50 people agree"!
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

RustyFingers

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RustyFingers » Wed Aug 05, 2015 12:31 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:There's an advert that claims (I can't remember the product) "up to 100% effective"
Surely it would be more impressive (but no less true) if they said "up to 110% effective"
Is that "Up to and including" 100% effectiveness, or just "up to" 100% effectiveness?

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Langenb
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Langenb » Wed Aug 05, 2015 1:08 pm

Boreout (as opposed to Burnout) - but that might be due to the fact, that I increasingly show symptoms of it...
Der spirituelle Mensch bündelt die Aufmerksamkeit nicht auf die Vielfalt des Unterscheidbaren, sondern auf die Einheit des Unterschiedlichen.

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Langenb
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Langenb » Wed Aug 05, 2015 1:15 pm

pogmoor wrote:Because I realise language changes constantly I try and reconcile myself to new word usage, but I do find myself irritated by some phrases that suddenly leap into prominence. In the UK everyone seems to have started using the phrase 'going forward' when talking about plans, policies or anything that's going to happen in the future. It's always totally redundant since plans etc can only influence the future. Another one is the phrase used about computer software. Every new version of a product these days is built 'from the ground up'......which means what exactly? :?
could mean, they didn't bild it "Top-Down".
Der spirituelle Mensch bündelt die Aufmerksamkeit nicht auf die Vielfalt des Unterscheidbaren, sondern auf die Einheit des Unterschiedlichen.

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Mark Featherstone
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Mark Featherstone » Wed Aug 05, 2015 2:04 pm

pogmoor wrote:In the UK everyone seems to have started using the phrase 'going forward' when talking about plans, policies or anything that's going to happen in the future. It's always totally redundant since plans etc can only influence the future.
Ah, you have reminded of a term that annoys me almost as much as incentivize, and that is to pre-plan. How on earth did this get started? A plan, by definition, is "pre". You cannot post-plan, and when you plan, you are already "pre" whatever you are planning. So everything one could possibly wish to convey by pre-plan is contained by definition within plan....I'm starting to hyperventilate.
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"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse."
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RustyFingers

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RustyFingers » Thu Aug 06, 2015 6:25 am

Oh God. Don't get me started on business-speak.

"Pro-forma" as in "I want you to complete a pro-forma" means literally nothing. What they mean is "I want you to complete a form". "Pro-forma" means "for the sake of form". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pro_forma. I blame Pro-vitamin B5 for that particular bit of nonsense.

And "pro-active" has been on my hate list for the last 25 years. As far as I can tell this means simply "active" but people insist on it meaning something like "greater than active, actually actively active" as if that meant anything.

Also singing / "from the same hymn sheet" / "the same tune" = "in agreement". Just say "in agreement" - stop resorting to crap metaphors!

Hmm. I might have to go and have a lie down.

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Andrew Fryer » Thu Aug 06, 2015 8:55 am

I know someone else who abhors the continuous present, but I don't.
The difference between "I think such and such" and "I am thinking such and such" is, the former expresses a mindset, whereas the latter expresses a temporary assumption.
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

RustyFingers

Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by RustyFingers » Thu Aug 06, 2015 10:33 am

It's not that I have a problem with the continuous present per se, just that specific phrase.

For one thing we don't use the '-ing' form in the first-person continuous present for verbs that express states such as love, hate, want, belief, thought, &c.
We say "I love you", "I hate you", "I believe you" not "I'm loving you", "I'm hating you", "I'm believing you".
We reserve the '-ing' form for verbs expressing actions such as to jump (I am jumping), to swim (I am swimming), to argue (I am arguing).

Also they don't mean "love" they mean "like" (although I accept that "love" is often used in spoken English to mean "like" so this is more a miserly grumble than an actual grammatical point).

So it's just a horrible construction all round.

Of course all this is subject to the caveat that language is in a state of flux and appeals to normative language generally rely on the concept that language is more static than it actually is.
But still.
If you were teaching someone English and you asked them whether if they believe "2 + 2 = 4", if they replied "I'm believing it" you would correct them because that's not what we say. We say "I believe it".

This McDonalds phrase. I'm hating it.

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Mark Featherstone
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Post by Mark Featherstone » Fri Aug 07, 2015 2:50 am

RustyFingers wrote:And "pro-active" has been on my hate list for the last 25 years.
Me too! It just dropped in out of nowhere. As did "pushing the envelope", which bothers me most simply because I don't understand it.
Francisco Navarro Concert Classical, cedar top, 630 mm scale, 50 mm nut

"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse."
Bruce Cockburn

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