Neologisms you hate

Talk about things that are not necessarily related to music or the guitar.
RustyFingers

Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby RustyFingers » Fri Aug 07, 2015 7:56 am

Oh god yeah. And "blue sky thinking". The sky thinks now?

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Andrew Fryer » Fri Aug 07, 2015 8:52 am

But I hate a lot of old things too.
"Let's be honest" annoys me, as it implies one has been being dishonest.
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

uptempo
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby uptempo » Sat Aug 08, 2015 8:14 pm

I guess they are not neologisms but these phrases bug me:

House Buying:
Ticks all the boxes
It's a good project

Corporate
Heading up
Across the piece
"Never believe what an artist says, only what they do" - Walter Sickert

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Pulgar
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Pulgar » Sun Aug 09, 2015 6:36 pm

Mark Featherstone wrote:
RustyFingers wrote:And "pro-active" has been on my hate list for the last 25 years.

Me too! It just dropped in out of nowhere. As did "pushing the envelope", which bothers me most simply because I don't understand it.

Hello Mark,

In aerodynamics, the flight envelope of an aircraft is a graph showing airspeed vs. load factor (or altitude). For small prop driven aircraft, the envelope is almost rectangular, thus the name. An aircraft is designed to fly within that 'envelope'. When a plane is pushed, i.e. when diving it at high speeds, it is said to be flying "outside the envelope", usually considered risky or dangerous.

Hope that helps. I wonder how many us try to play the guitar outside our skill envelope (chuckle)?

- Pulgar

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Mark Featherstone
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Mark Featherstone » Tue Aug 11, 2015 2:23 am

Pulgar wrote:
Mark Featherstone wrote:
RustyFingers wrote:And "pro-active" has been on my hate list for the last 25 years.

Me too! It just dropped in out of nowhere. As did "pushing the envelope", which bothers me most simply because I don't understand it.

Hello Mark,

In aerodynamics, the flight envelope of an aircraft is a graph showing airspeed vs. load factor (or altitude). For small prop driven aircraft, the envelope is almost rectangular, thus the name. An aircraft is designed to fly within that 'envelope'. When a plane is pushed, i.e. when diving it at high speeds, it is said to be flying "outside the envelope", usually considered risky or dangerous.

Hope that helps. I wonder how many us try to play the guitar outside our skill envelope (chuckle)?

- Pulgar

Wonderful, Pulgar! Thank you so much. Haha, I would say my playing is stuck in the glue under the flap of the envelope.
Mark
Francisco Navarro Concert Classical, cedar top, 630 mm scale, 50 mm nut

"The trouble with normal is it always gets worse."
Bruce Cockburn

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Andrew Fryer » Wed Jan 11, 2017 7:01 pm

ArthurG wrote:I do like a good pedants' revolt! ;-)

Q: Who led the pedants' revolt?
A: Which Tyler.
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

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Evocacion
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Evocacion » Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:30 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:There's an advert that claims (I can't remember the product) "up to 100% effective"
Surely it would be more impressive (but no less true) if they said "up to 110% effective"

And a while ago there was an advert that claimed "87% of 50 people agree"!


Advertisers and copy writers seem to have no grasp of either Maths or English. I'm just back from shopping, where I saw a package of Philadelphia cream cheese marked 'Original', and a bit lower down 'Now even more creamy!'. A clear case of advertisers' cognitive dissonance.

PeteJ
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby PeteJ » Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:42 pm

Lovemyguitar wrote:I realize that languages evolve, but that doesn't mean that certain new words do not annoy me!


What annoys me is spell-checkers that try to make me use a 'z' in realise. :)

I wonder if spell-check designers are now the main force in changing language.

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Andrew Fryer » Thu Jan 12, 2017 2:51 pm

Evocacion wrote: I saw a package of Philadelphia cream cheese marked 'Original', and a bit lower down 'Now even more creamy!'. A clear case of advertisers' cognitive dissonance.

Washing powder adverts have been good for that for 20 or 30 years - "Here's how new Daz compares with old Daz - old Daz makes everything grey" (contradicting all the old adverts for Daz)
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

Lovemyguitar
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Lovemyguitar » Thu Jan 12, 2017 4:52 pm

PeteJ wrote:
Lovemyguitar wrote:I realize that languages evolve, but that doesn't mean that certain new words do not annoy me!

What annoys me is spell-checkers that try to make me use a 'z' in realise. :)

I wonder if spell-check designers are now the main force in changing language.

Ah, well it depends if the language of the spell-checker is set to British or American English as to whether it favours s or z (which, of course, is pronounced "zed"), or whether it allows us to write "favours" as I just did. That's a good point, though -- spell checkers, especially on phones, often change entire words, which can be amusing or simply baffling.

Cass Couvelas
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Cass Couvelas » Thu Jan 12, 2017 7:43 pm

Lovemyguitar wrote: . . .spell checkers, especially on phones, often change entire words, which can be amusing or simply baffling.


So very true. A recent exhange I had with 'predictive' text switched on during a journey to Wimbledon resulted in: 'Simpleton train in four minutes'. And my attempt at texting the word 'phenomenal' resulted in 'pheasant o.penal'.

I'm perhaps prepared to accept that the first part of the word 'phenomenal' might conceivably be interpreted by the phone's workings as 'pheasant' (!); but in what universe does 'pheasant o.penal' exist, and under what possible circumstances might it be predicted?
"She ran the whole gamut of emotions from A to B."
(Dorothy Parker on Katharine Hepburn)

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Andrew Fryer » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:24 pm

A lot of them memorise everything you type in, even though some of it will be accidental. In Wordperfect it was easy to access the internal dictionaries and delete all the rubbish from time to time, but on my not so smart phone, I haven't found out yet how to get in and delete the tripe.
1975 Calatayud y Gisbert, Yamaha CG131S.

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Erik Zurcher
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Erik Zurcher » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:26 pm

"Limited Edition" for mass produced articles.
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"While you try to master classical guitar, prepare for a slave's life: the guitar will forever be your master and you its slave".

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petermc61
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby petermc61 » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:40 pm

I have a passionate dislike when I see when somebody says they have 'reached out' to me. Totally unnecessary, when the word 'contacted' could have been used.

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Contreras
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Re: Neologisms you hate

Postby Contreras » Thu Jan 12, 2017 8:50 pm

I hate seeing 'loose' when 'lose' is the intended meaning. Spellcheckers are clearly to blame for this solecism slipping into the language.
Any philosophy that can be put in a nutshell belongs in one.


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