String conservation

Choice of classical guitar strings and technical issues connected with their use.
Daniel Penalva
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String conservation

Post by Daniel Penalva » Thu Jul 20, 2017 5:48 pm

Do you think thats effective to try to conservate strings with a flannel after every playing session ?

Pede
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Re: String conservation

Post by Pede » Thu Jul 20, 2017 6:05 pm

I doubt If that maken sense. Why would you do that?
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Pje53
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Re: String conservation

Post by Pje53 » Thu Jul 20, 2017 7:17 pm

Can you get a product called "fast fret" in Brazil? http://www.*** Commercial link removed ***/Fast-Fret-String- ... B0002D0CQC Just wipe it on the strings / fret board and then wipe it off with a duster. Cleans both the strings and fret board at the same time.

Daniel Penalva
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Re: String conservation

Post by Daniel Penalva » Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:28 pm

Pede wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 6:05 pm
I doubt If that maken sense. Why would you do that?
Delay rusting of 4 5 and 6 strings for nylon.

I dont know if there is something in Brazil, but probably yes. What is this ? a oil ?

Keith
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Re: String conservation

Post by Keith » Thu Jul 20, 2017 11:57 pm

As I understand the product, the stuff contains white mineral oil. I am not sure if mineral oil will keep classical guitar strings fresh. I suspect the stuff was designed for steel strings to prevent rusting. If anything rubbing down strings with a cloth impregnated with baking soda or cleaning one's hand with baking soda prior to playing might be the magic balm--baking soda is a good neutralizer for weak acids. SBM sells bass sets only. Buy 4 bass sets to 1 set of trebles. Best route for my money and it avoids boiling ammonia which is stinky/toxic and could result in the police showing up at your door looking for a meth lab.
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Daniel Penalva
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Re: String conservation

Post by Daniel Penalva » Sat Jul 22, 2017 8:22 pm

Iam sticking to homemade solutions. Heard that lemon or apple vinager also can clean rust, baking soda as you said, but i cant be sure that the string life will be longer. Will make some experiments in old strings.

Laudiesdad69
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Re: String conservation

Post by Laudiesdad69 » Sat Jul 22, 2017 9:02 pm

There is a product called "Finger Ease" that you spray on. It leaves a coating on the string after you spray it and then wipe it off. I never liked it because it makes the strings feel slick, but it does keep the acids from your sweat off. Don't use it on the trebles though, just the basses. It's an old product that has been around since the 70's.

Spray your strings and wipe them before you put them on, then you don't have it all over your fret board.spray a little on a cloth then wipe your strings. I had to use this on steel strings, before they came out with coated strings. You might want to try that as well. D'Addario EXP series basses are really good, and they don't feel greasy like using the spray.

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pogmoor
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Re: String conservation

Post by pogmoor » Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:22 pm

Daniel Penalva wrote:
Thu Jul 20, 2017 8:28 pm
Delay rusting of 4 5 and 6 strings for nylon.
Classical guitar strings don't rust. Rusting is what happens to iron (and steel). Classical guitar strings don't contain iron.
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Daniel Penalva
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Re: String conservation

Post by Daniel Penalva » Sat Jul 22, 2017 10:49 pm

But what is the process happening in the cover of 4 5 6 nylon strings ? When they start to change colors and the tone get worse.

MessyTendon
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Re: String conservation

Post by MessyTendon » Sun Jul 23, 2017 5:50 am

I think people assume they need to change strings too often based on cosmetics. The inner wrap of the string and windings wear from tuning...The more you fatigue the material, the more it will wear. So long as the winding and filament remains tight in the wrap it should sound good.

Bass strings get crud in them...wiping the surface isn't going to get the fine particles out of the windings. If the strings are long enough...don't cut them at all...

Retie them and reverse them...this extends the string life a little bit. Typically they wear in the most common openly used positions.

I honestly think people take string vanity way too seriously....

More critical to good string life is a clean fretboard and highly polished frets. It's the abrasion of the metal frets that causes frets to wear...also your pressure...the less pressure the better, less wear on strings and frets.

A well rung out and damp cloth, to wipe the fretboard after each string change will help keep the fretboard clean...and the ever so slight moisture will keep the fingerboard hydrated. Don't use stupid oil products on the fretboard, your natural hand oils will work just fine.

Dead skin particles accumulate and build up on the fingerboard, you can't see it, but those dead skin flakes wear strings. Any abrasion is going to mess things up.

I think people assume strings are not good because of tarnish, that's just silly. Cosmetic oxidations has nothing do with much of anything. Brand new strings left in a case can tarnish, that's not reason not play them or change them.

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rojarosguitar
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Re: String conservation

Post by rojarosguitar » Sun Jul 23, 2017 6:06 am

There are two things that necessitate changing of bass strings:

1. fret wear (the little indentations in the string wire, that finally cause breaking of the winding; mostly with the D-string). This can be delayed by shifting the string towards the bridge a bit from time to time. Prolongates the life of the D string so that you don't need to change the D string before the other bass strings.

2. more and more dirt coming into the spaces between the windings and baked together by finger sweat. It works very well to remove them in a 5% ammonia (you buy household ammonia and dilute it with water so that the resulting concoction is 5% Ammonia.) Opposite to light acids like vinegar or lemon ammonia solves effectively fat and organic substances. By leaving your bass strings for 15-30 minutes in that, and than well rinsing them in cold (!) clear water and wiping them dry in soft cloth you gain at least a second life for the bass strings. Of course be careful not to get the staff into your eyes and to do it in a well ventilated room. Especially the mixing of the 5% solution should be done in well ventilated room as ammonia is aggressive on respiratory organs. The limit of this is mechanical wear (#1). The advantage of this procedure over changing to new strings is that they settle very quickly and, if you are not specially keen for the sound of totally new strings, sound very nice - refreshed but not metallic like new strings.
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Rognvald
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Re: String conservation

Post by Rognvald » Wed Aug 02, 2017 8:06 pm

Dan,
I use Dunlop 65 string conditioner after every practice session. It extends the life of the strings and you can visually see the contamination being removed when you wipe it off with a paper towel. I hope this helps. Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

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