Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Sun Jun 12, 2016 11:34 am

Here it is wchymeus, one development of the "rectangular guitar with moving back pedal" of 1996 as played by Smaro. Below is a post of the
“KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT PEDAL GUITAR” comprised of two components: the "Kertsopoulos Minimal Guitar" and a plastic flower pot that has been upgraded to a guitar body amplifier/resonator. The photos show the parts as separate units and also assembled as a unity comprising the instrument.
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT PEDAL GUITARB.JPG

KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT PEDAL GUITAR.JPG
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT GUITAR (5).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT GUITAR (6).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT GUITAR (7).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT GUITAR (8).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT GUITAR (13).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT GUITAR (16).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT GUITAR (19).jpg


You can view and listen to this pedal guitar on the following video of duet improvisation.On one channel I play the "Kertsopoulos classical pedal guitar" and on the other channel I play the “KERTSOPOULOS OCTAGONAL FLOWER POT PEDAL GUITAR”.

Youtube
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dgutowski
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby dgutowski » Mon Jun 13, 2016 8:05 am

As a beginner with the classical guitar, I have found it very helpful to play different guitars and different sizes of guitars and it actually helps to relax and not take playing so seriously and to remember to have fun while playing. After watching the video and reading the comments, I realize you can be creative and play music that is beautiful and artistic and still be free of "traditional" instrument restraints...why not be innovative and explore the musical medium. It's a lot like modern art or impressionism. Thank you for your creativity and innovation-it helps me to remember not to let my guitar playing hobby become an obsession. And because it's a struggle to get better and is difficult to learn and you instinctively want to improve, you can easily become obsessed with learning to play...and that's not a good thing-but I'm not going to cut my ear off. Thanks again.
David V. :casque:

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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Tue Jun 14, 2016 4:43 pm

dgutowski wrote:As a beginner with the classical guitar, I have found it very helpful to play different guitars and different sizes of guitars and it actually helps to relax and not take playing so seriously and to remember to have fun while playing. After watching the video and reading the comments, I realize you can be creative and play music that is beautiful and artistic and still be free of "traditional" instrument restraints...why not be innovative and explore the musical medium. It's a lot like modern art or impressionism. Thank you for your creativity and innovation-it helps me to remember not to let my guitar playing hobby become an obsession. And because it's a struggle to get better and is difficult to learn and you instinctively want to improve, you can easily become obsessed with learning to play...and that's not a good thing-but I'm not going to cut my ear off. Thanks again.
David V. :casque:

Hi David V. and thanks very much for your kind comments. I agree with you that music is mainly the "fun of playing" as you mainly expressed it so nicely. If we take the fun of playing away from our guitar or from music we are left with too much academic or even non-academic boredom that sometimes refers to "tradition" as a means of torturing the newcomers and the young at the field of guitar devlopment. However, tradition as well as the whole history of the guitar is equally important as the guarding of the "fun of playing", as long as these are not approached on a surface basis but are studied in depth and in a serious manner. For example in all the posts of my pedal guitars you might see innovations that seem to be irrelevant with the history and tradition of the instrument. Some are, but most of them are directly linked to historical trends, traditions and forms of stringing, tuning, lutherie practices and many times are brought to life with new materials and new approaches in lutherie practice. So, the revival of the many guitar forms and guitar tunings and guitar stringing that my work brings as "Kertsopoulos Aesthetics" would not be possible to be achieved without the deep study of the history and all traditions surrounding the interpretation, the composing, the stringing, the tuning, the making of the instruments in all the periods of the guitar's life. It took me five and a half years of very hard work to design the "Kertsopoulos Mathematical Model of the Guitar" which is the one connected directly with Antonio de Torres and the tradition of the guitar. That helped so much in all my aspects of my construction and in all my innovations, it did not keep me back and it did not subtract anything out of the "fun of playing or constructing". It only helped me because it is the tradition studied in depth not on the surface. I post it right here for your reference and I wish you the best progress in guitar and music. Thanks again for your wonderful comments. Also, Vincent Van Gogh might have saved the cutting of his ear if he didn't argue with Paul Gauguin that night (as some but not all of his followers claim).
mathematical model-Kertsopoulos.JPG
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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Wed Jun 15, 2016 9:30 pm

Since the "Kertsopoulos mathematical model of the classical guitar" is posted above, please find below the "Kertsopoulos geometrical progression of the classical guitar".
geometrical progression-KertsopoulosG.JPG

This "geometrical progression" shows step by step the initial lines that are the basis for the "mathematical model" that evolves and continue step by step to the final "geometrical structure" that defines the final "mathematical model".
The "geometrical progression" supports the "mathematical model", which contains both simple and intricate mathematical proportions and ratios, as well as constructional approximations and dependencies of an interesting historical and acoustical context also.
It can be seen, that the whole essence of the guitar’s shape and context is directly related to the ratios and relations existing in the physical behavior of sound as expressed by the harmonic spectrum, the specific tuning of the instrument, the ideal behavior of strings and the diatonic system.
This multi-interconnection relation combined with the acoustical function of the perimeter-outline, creating “standing wave zones” (see below fig's 3e, 3f, 3g and 3h - Fig's 3a to 3d avoid standing wave formation):
standing waves.jpg

Also, specific enhancement of preferred resonant frequencies of the chamber and control of the “wolf tone” production, gives satisfying answers to so many questions put forward by many in the past.
Questions of the nature:
1) What determines the location and size of the sound hole and the bridge?
2) Why this shape?
3) What is the real magic about the 65-cm scale length? (32.5 x 2 = 65 - 32.5 is the violin's ideal string length).
4) What is the aesthetic but also acoustically ideal curvature of the outline?
5) Why does every experiment link back in a mysterious way to the center of tradition, that center being mainly Antonio de Torres?
6) Why did Hauser and so many other luthiers copy instinctively and through experience obtained in construction the work of Antonio de Torres?
7) Why this mathematical model is found in the work of Antonio de Torres initially and afterwards in the guitars of the Ramirez family throughout their history and also in Hauser's work but not in any other guitar made by any luthier before 1982? After 1982 (Greek publication at IHOS) and 1983 where the mathematical model was presented internationally at Musik Messe Frankfurt in Feb. 5-9, 1983 and published internationally by Das Musikinstrument in the English and German languages, many luthiers and guitar companies started to use it successfully. At the press conference in Musik Messe in 1983, Maestro Jose Ramirez III stated:"...after this presentation made by Mr. Kertsopoulos better guitars will be built all over the world...".

Below is the dedication of Maestro Jose Ramirez III to this specific work.
Mr Ramirez dedication with translation-small.jpg

Il signor Kertsopoulos fece una brillante esposizione su tutti i calcoli matematici necessari per ottenere un disegno della cassa della chitarra (curve, intaglio, bocca, dimensioni ecc.), perfetta, in base a rigore scientifico, partendo da qualsiasi lunghezza di diapason…
Edizioni Suvini Zerboni., 1983, Page 46

Translated: Mr. Kertsopoulos made a brilliant exposition of all the mathematical calculations necessary to obtain a drawing of the body of the guitar (curves, carving, soundhole, dimensions, etc.) perfect, based on scientific rigor, starting from any length of string scale…
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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Thu Jun 16, 2016 8:51 am

2 guitars pythagorean rectangles.jpg

Construction of a "Golden Section":
GOLDEN SECTION FIG. 1.jpg

Construction of a "Golden Rectangle":
Construction of golden rectangles.jpg

The just ratios, the traditional tonal interval names and the interval inversions:
just ratios and intervals FIG. 5.jpg

By dividing the numbers 2,3,4,5,6 with the corresponding numbers 1,2,3,4,5, we obtain the just ratios on the left side of the figure above, that also give the equivalence of the traditional interval names and in each parenthesis the interval inversions are shown on the right.
Harry Partch distinguishes between the 16:9 “small just ‘minor seventh’” and the 9:5 “large just ‘minor seventh’”. Also, the 16:15 ratio concerning the semitone in its most common form in just intonation takes a different value in 12-tone equal temperament, which is a form of meantone tuning where the diatonic and chromatic semitones are exactly the same, due to the unbreakable circle of fifths.

In equal temperament used by the guitar’s fret locating idiom, each semitone is equal to one twelfth of an octave. Every frequency is multiplied by 1.059463094 (1.05946 is regarded adequate) to reach the frequency of the next higher semitone. This ratio being the twelfth root of 2 is equivalent to 100 cents but it is 11.7 cents narrower than the 16:15 ratio found in just intonation.

These are basic discrepancies occurring from the necessity of having fixed metal frets on the modern classical guitar, which obligate it to play in equal temperament. Contrary to this habit, the baroque and renaissance guitar or lute used gut frets that were movable to compensate for these important peculiarities and problems arising from conflicting tuning practices.

How do these conflicting discrepancies affect the tone and timbre output of the modern classical guitar?

If for example we play the sixth string (E=82.4 Hz), it includes in its harmonic content the note g’# as fifth harmonic with frequency value: 82.4 x 5 = 412 Hz. The g’# found on the fourth fret of the first string, gives for its prime frequency 415.26 Hz derived by multiplying the first open string (e’=329.6 Hz) by 1.05946 and also repeating the procedure for each next frequency until the fourth fret is calculated.

Between the g’# (fifth harmonic of the sixth string) and the g’# (prime frequency found on the fourth fret of the first string) there is a noticeable audible difference in frequency of more than 3 Hz that creates beats at a rate of a little more than three full vibrations per second. Beat frequencies are created when two or more frequencies have a small difference in Hz value when sounded simultaneously.

This creates an audible distinguished harshness to the sound that is not pleasant when the notes are played simultaneously and this problem is carried on in all the frequencies of the instrument. If one adds the possible deviations from the ideal behavior of the harmonic spectrum that are inevitable to occur, meaning that the fifth harmonic partial of the sixth string might deviate on the specific guitar even more downwards in its response, than the problem of tone harshness of the instrument becomes even greater.

This beat frequency problem occurring between the conflicts of the harmonic partials in their simultaneous sounding with the prime frequencies of the same notes with occurring discrepancies cause harshness and also loss in the beauty of the tone. The cause for this acoustical and musical problem lies mainly in the relation that exists between the harmonic series behavior and the necessity of having a fixed fretted instrument.

Not few guitars, while they possess an outstanding sound in volume in general terms, however, present a harsh and unpleasant feeling when the beat frequency problem is there and it was not solved acoustically in the design of the construction of the instrument.

If this problem is not solved by the acoustic design of the reverberation chamber (the functional properties of the inside space of the instrument that will be a direct result of the defined chosen outline) it will remain a main disadvantage for the tonal and timbre qualities of the guitar.

The mathematical model of the guitar provides various solutions to this specific tonal problem that is pinpointed and specifically defined here.
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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Sat Jun 18, 2016 7:40 am

Three guitars (below) constructed by Y.Kertsopoulos incorporating “The Kertsopoulos mathematical model of the guitar” with his innovational mechanism of the right hand pedal effect shown and the overlaid with acoustical wooden stripes back and sides.
KERTSOPOULOS GUITAR 2010 FIG.6.jpg

KERTSOPOULOS CLASSICAL GUITAR WITH RIGHT HAND PEDAL (2).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS CLASSICAL GUITAR WITH RIGHT HAND PEDAL (17).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS CLASSICAL GUITAR WITH RIGHT HAND PEDAL (18).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS CLASSICAL GUITAR WITH RIGHT HAND PEDAL (4).jpg
KERTSOPOULOS CLASSICAL GUITAR WITH RIGHT HAND PEDAL (9).jpg
DSC03163-SMALL.jpg
THE KERTSOPOULOS FLAMENCO - CLASSICAL GUITAR (16).jpg
DSC08370.JPG
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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Sat Jun 18, 2016 9:28 am

DSC08371.JPG
DSC08484.JPG

Kertsopoulos rosette.jpg
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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Sat Jun 18, 2016 4:22 pm

Below is a "Kertsopoulos double course right hand pedal guitar" possessing the "Kertsopoulos Mathematical Model of the Guitar" in its design and construction.
11147847_10205793543731836_5944837969094629746_o.jpg
11884698_10205793545691885_3934202540912376547_o.jpg
10631256_10205793548331951_6462885518889017359_o.jpg
10494963_10205793548411953_3572523360992581380_o.jpg
905651_10205793548371952_6300360767635081095_o.jpg
11884725_10205793545771887_5014691245574461730_o.jpg
11892300_10205793543851839_4887962284667809674_o.jpg
11924819_10205793548571957_9074631840909157662_o.jpg
11951709_10205793546891915_2199485151203108284_o.jpg
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Mon Jun 20, 2016 6:19 pm

The etude 1 by Heitor Villa Lobos interpreted on a "Kertsopoulos right hand pedal guitar" using pedal effects and high tuning with especially designed and constructed high tuning strings.The guitar is tuned so that the 6th string is C# and the tuning of the open strings=the 9th fret frequencies of the normal guitar tuning.

Youtube

daryl993manggip
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby daryl993manggip » Tue Jun 21, 2016 12:18 am

The idea of a "miminal" guitar attached to what is essentially an amplifier would never have occurred to me! Makes me wonder what could be achieved if the idea was expanded and developed more. Yorgos, bravo for daring to innovate and experiment! By the way, when you say pedal effects, do you mean similiar to the pedal effects of a piano pedal?

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kertsopoulos
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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Tue Jun 21, 2016 7:17 pm

daryl993manggip wrote:The idea of a "miminal" guitar attached to what is essentially an amplifier would never have occurred to me! Makes me wonder what could be achieved if the idea was expanded and developed more. Yorgos, bravo for daring to innovate and experiment! By the way, when you say pedal effects, do you mean similiar to the pedal effects of a piano pedal?

Thank you daryl993manggip for your kind comments.The "Kertsopoulos minimal guitar" idea is endless in the capabilities it offers to variate with different forms of "amplifiers-resonators bodies" that will be attached to the "minimal guitar" and according to each different body's characteristics we can have different colors and timbers of sound, while we keep the "minimal guitar" the same. So, we just detouch-unscrew the "minimal guitar" from one "amplifier body" and connect/screw it to another "amplifier body" within two minutes and we have another guitar by using the same "minimal guitar" but different "resonator-amplifier body" for each case. Of course, when we say pedal effects we mean exactly what the term defines, it is similar to the piano, yes. However, the pedal effects that I have introduced on my guitars in the different constructional manner for each case over-pass the capabilities of the piano pedals. The pedal effects produced on my guitars are much more than the possibilities of effects given by the piano pedals. Soon, I will post here a "Kertsopoulos carton box pedal guitar" where we will have the "minimal guitar" connected/screwed to the "carton box" and I will sound the "minimal guitar" alone with no amplifier and then sound it with the amplifier "carton box" so you can compare the differences. I will play some pieces on it and then I will also explain in a simple manner the different pedal effects produced. Stay well and happy playing, all best!Yorgos

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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Thu Jun 23, 2016 4:53 am

Hi daryl993manggip, please find below my explanations in the begining of the video of the "pedal effects" introduced in my guitar construction for enriching the interpretational capabilities of the guitarist. We can view on the video the "minimal guitar" construction assembled on a "carton box" that acts as a "resonator-amplifier" and the top and back surfaces of the "carton box" being flexible can both move accordingly to produce different pedal effects. After the explanations an improvisation is played and then the "minimal guitar" and the "carton box" are shown separately disassembled and afterwards they are sounded separately so we can hear the small sound of the "minimal guitar" when it is played alone and afterwards when it is placed on the resonator-amplifier "carton box" body we can hear the cosiderably great amplification produced. The assembled parts constitute the "Kertsopoulos carton box pedal guitar". A part of my work "Marathonas" is played in the end on the guitar, using the pedal effects.The ZOOM Q3HD has been used for recording with two microphones and the recording has been left untouched, no re-mixing or any recording effects or filters have been used. The final audio result is exactly as the first recording take of the two microphones, so we can get a real down to earth picture and idea of the acoustic and musical results.

Youtube

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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Fri Jun 24, 2016 9:25 am


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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Fri Jun 24, 2016 10:59 pm

Yorgos Kertsopoulos interprets Recuerdos de la Alhambra by Fransisco Tarrega on a Kertsopoulos constructed guitar respecting the "Kertsopoulos mathematical model and geometrical progression of the guitar on Greek TV on Nov. 93.

Youtube

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Re: Pedal guitars, Mathematical Model of the Guitar, Strings, etc by:Y.Kertsopoulos

Postby kertsopoulos » Fri Jun 24, 2016 11:17 pm



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