Regarding the trill notes in RDLA

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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kl31
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Regarding the trill notes in RDLA

Post by kl31 » Mon Nov 28, 2016 8:53 pm

After months of (very unstructured) practice, the trill notes still feel awkward to play. It throws off the rhythm and the melody sounds discontinuous at the moment of the trill.

I might have been trying to hard to make the trill stand out by pulling off too hard after the hammer-on, which doesn't sound too great. It also screws with the tempo because it takes a bit too long to do a full pull off. I've also tried to simply forgo the pull off, and quickly tap the string without pulling it off. Doing it softly preserves rhythm, but its barely audible. Trying to add a bit more force ever so slightly delays the next quadruplet.

Not sure what to do here. any advice?

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markodarko
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Re: Regarding the trill notes in RDLA

Post by markodarko » Mon Nov 28, 2016 9:39 pm

I'd suggest playing that part very, very slowly. Almost at a standstill and don't rush it to speed.
Negative, I am a meat popsicle.

Mr.Rain
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Re: Regarding the trill notes in RDLA

Post by Mr.Rain » Tue Dec 20, 2016 10:44 am

kl31 wrote:After months of (very unstructured) practice, the trill notes still feel awkward to play. It throws off the rhythm and the melody sounds discontinuous at the moment of the trill.

I might have been trying to hard to make the trill stand out by pulling off too hard after the hammer-on, which doesn't sound too great. It also screws with the tempo because it takes a bit too long to do a full pull off. I've also tried to simply forgo the pull off, and quickly tap the string without pulling it off. Doing it softly preserves rhythm, but its barely audible. Trying to add a bit more force ever so slightly delays the next quadruplet.

Not sure what to do here. any advice?
For me it is also a problem, specially the 2nd trill (executed with the pinky at least in my edition), it is really challenging to make it sound clear and in tempo, what it do is fret also with the 1st finger(is not being used on that figure) to support the hand completely, it makes the pull of a tiny bit easier.

Joey Grimaldi
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Re: Regarding the trill notes in RDLA

Post by Joey Grimaldi » Tue Feb 14, 2017 9:31 am

I find it helpful to isolate the rhythm there and to practice feeling the rhythm of the 2 32nd notes followed by a 32nd note triplet. Make sure you hit the triplet with the m finger and skip the i on that tremolo pattern.

Also it's a bit easier to convert it to 16th notes or even eighth notes with the metronome to make sure that it's more precise.

Once it's flowing a bit more bring it up to speed. It's such a fast maneuver that you have to hear it and understand it in your mind first, then it will translate to your fingers.

Also keep your hammers and pulls very light and elegant don't over do them. They are an afterthought to the melody, light, swift and inconspicuous. A little bit of seasoning or herbs added to the main dish.

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Cloth Ears
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Re: Regarding the trill notes in RDLA

Post by Cloth Ears » Tue Feb 14, 2017 9:55 am

It took me years, and a decent Luthier built guitar to get that right. You are not alone. Muscle strength helps. Once you have the strength, you can relax and not use as much force.

ben etow
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Re: Regarding the trill notes in RDLA

Post by ben etow » Wed Feb 15, 2017 12:49 pm

kl31 wrote:After months of (very unstructured) practice, the trill notes still feel awkward to play.

I've also tried to simply forgo the pull off, and quickly tap the string without pulling it off. Doing it softly preserves rhythm, but its barely audible.
1) you may want to structure your pratice and make sure you prepare/plant all fingers involved in the tricky passages, and then decomposing all the movements to ensure you do them right. Spreed it up only after that.

2) pulling off takes time. At full speed you may here very well what's barely audible at a slower tempo. You don't have to believe me, but believe Ricardo Gallén and Pavel Steidl who said it first... :D

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