RH technique

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robk
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RH technique

Post by robk » Tue Dec 13, 2016 4:20 pm

As an absolute beginner I wonder about the following:
Every teacher/teaching book says you have to alternate your fingers according to i-m or m-a.
I understand and acknowledge that this is quite useful for playing quarters, eights or 16Th if they are in a progression.
But what if you arrived at the end of a phrase - is it still important to keep strictly to the i-m pattern?
I mean, when I play a half note or a rest, I have simply forgotten which finger I used to strike the last string.
Also I have the experience that when you go from e.g. the D-string to the g-string it is much easier to use the same finger (but probably that is my own problem..)

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AndreiKrylov
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Location: Canada, USA, Mexico, Portugal, Spain

Re: RH technique

Post by AndreiKrylov » Tue Dec 13, 2016 4:37 pm

robk wrote:As an absolute beginner I wonder about the following:
Every teacher/teaching book says you have to alternate your fingers according to i-m or m-a.
I understand and acknowledge that this is quite useful for playing quarters, eights or 16Th if they are in a progression.
But what if you arrived at the end of a phrase - is it still important to keep strictly to the i-m pattern?
I mean, when I play a half note or a rest, I have simply forgotten which finger I used to strike the last string.
Also I have the experience that when you go from e.g. the D-string to the g-string it is much easier to use the same finger (but probably that is my own problem..)
You probably talking about certain piece or exercise.
Or playing some kind of melodic lines .
- if so then do what your teacher told to you.
And - Yes, it is good to alternate RH fingers, but it could be different in each piece according to patterns in it. Especiallyif it is arpeggio like...
And It could many many different alternations...
here the beginning of list just by using tirando only.
It could be different lists for mixing tirando with apoyando and rasgueado with one or both technique, and more... :)
Why do we need to alternate them so much?
because each finger will give unique coloring to sound (because of its different strength, angle and speed and amount of control which one could have in it) thus making music interesting and unique. :)
im
mi
imi
mim
pi
ip
pm
mp
ima
ami
mai
mia
aim
iim
iiim
mmi
mma
aam
iimmaa
mimia
imima
aiaim
pima
pami
pimae
eamip
eamiam

etc. etc. etc.
I'd better speak by music...Please listen Andrei Krylov at Spotify, iTunes, Apple Music, Amazon Prime etc. Thanks!

pmiklitz
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Location: Oxford, UK

Re: RH technique

Post by pmiklitz » Tue Dec 13, 2016 5:51 pm

Alteration is important, but it does not mean that you *always* have to use a different RH finger. It's perfectly fine to use the same finger again after a long note, a rest, etc.

If you know the "Bridges" series, you will notice that the RH fingerings use very strict alteration, which sometimes leads to very cumbersome movements which are much more difficult to learn than possible alternatives that employ the odd repeated finger.

My advice would be to always try different fingerings (also for the LH) and use what works best for you and is most musical.

Peter
Last edited by pmiklitz on Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:09 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Dringt durch des Aberglaubens Nacht, die Euch zu finstern Köpfen macht. Christian Fürchtegott Gellert (1715 - 1769)

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pogmoor
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Re: RH technique

Post by pogmoor » Tue Dec 13, 2016 6:06 pm

If you are an absolute beginner you do need to learn finger alternation as a basic part of your technique, so that it begins to feel like the natural way to play a sequence of notes. However, as Andrei suggests, it is a technique that you should eventually learn to apply flexibly according to the demands of each particular passage.
Eric from GuitarLoot
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robert e
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Re: RH technique

Post by robert e » Tue Dec 13, 2016 7:46 pm

You've gotten good general advice, but to answer your question: When you come to a pause in action as you describe, it's OK to "reset" the alternation, and in fact good practice for a beginner to take the opportunity to check your hand positions, posture, and prepare for what's coming next. More often that not, however, which finger you then start with will matter for what's coming. If it isn't marked, write it on the score so you'll remember.

Most beginners will actually find it easier to repeat a finger going the other way, from treble toward the bass--that is, using a rest stroke to pluck g places the finger on D and the temptation is to go ahead and play D with the same finger. Later on, that's ok on occasion or even desirable. But beginners are trying to develop good habits--good defaults--and alternation is a very very good thing to ingrain as a habit, to make natural, which is why it's an almost absolute rule for beginners, only a rule of thumb for intermediates, and merely a default for advanced players (though at any level, it's the only way to play fast scale passages while keeping the hand relaxed).

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