Looking for two and three octave arpeggios

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Eric Shacklett
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2016 12:57 am

Looking for two and three octave arpeggios

Postby Eric Shacklett » Sat Mar 04, 2017 6:24 pm

Hey all,

I'm looking for maybe a book or set of arpeggios that extend multiple octaves. I'm practicing the Segovia scales and I'm not quite at the level of villa lobos etude 2, but I like the idea of practicing all the basic arpeggios but up and down the neck, like I used to practice in piano class in college. Is there anything out there that fits this? Preferably fingered and with string indications?

Thanks!

Dirck Nagy
Posts: 472
Joined: Sat Sep 28, 2013 4:47 pm
Location: Wisconsin, USA

Re: Looking for two and three octave arpeggios

Postby Dirck Nagy » Sat Mar 04, 2017 8:13 pm

Hi eric

There are lots of publications out there, and lots of ways to play arpeggios, but I think a better way is to figure them out yourself.

The way I have students begin this is: if they are playing a scale in a certain position / form, to get the arpeggio to follow that position / form as closely as possible. e.g: if you are using the Segovia scales, say, for C major, (1st note is 5th string C, LH finger 2), then begin the arpeggio there, and make the same (or similar) shifts. Use the same variety of RH patterns as you would when playing scales & also invent new ones, such as using "a" for string crossing, etc...

A few benefits would be: reinforces the note names & positions of ^1, ^3, ^5, in your mind, rather than just repeating patterns. Also a lot of practical applications as composers often switch between scales and arpeggios as a development technique...so, chances are pretty good you will encounter a scale passage that ends up on a cerain position, and then a little later, an arpeggio pattern that ends up in the same place. This way, you would be matching the sonority by using the same strings (if thats what is called for, of course!)

cheers!
dirck

PS, looking at your profile, i see you are a Trombone player? I play Horn myself!
2015 John H. Dick
1994 Larry Breslin ("Deerhead")
1952 Vincente Tatay

Alan Green
Posts: 1457
Joined: Thu Dec 29, 2005 8:17 am
Location: Little Cambridge, Essex, UK

Re: Looking for two and three octave arpeggios

Postby Alan Green » Sat Mar 04, 2017 9:30 pm

As I recall, the London College of Music Grade 8 Exam book has the basic patterns for three-octave scales and arpeggios

Eric Shacklett
Posts: 27
Joined: Thu Mar 17, 2016 12:57 am

Re: Looking for two and three octave arpeggios

Postby Eric Shacklett » Mon Mar 06, 2017 4:21 am

Thanks for the replies, anything free I can find on the googles?

Salvador
Posts: 202
Joined: Tue Nov 24, 2015 10:59 am
Location: Asia

Re: Looking for two and three octave arpeggios

Postby Salvador » Mon Mar 06, 2017 4:32 am

Etude 2 is not hard to play. Practice it first in slow tempo, and increase it as you progress. Slowly but surely. You don't have to play it fast, because it's impossible. Every Etude 2 player started at normal tempo and they practiced it for years.


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