An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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glassynails
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An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by glassynails » Sun Apr 23, 2017 9:46 pm

I was thinking today that I usually try and adapt and learn technique as various things are presented as I learn new pieces. There's nothing in my opinion entirely wrong with this approach and it all depends also on your long term goals, etc. If you're like me, a hobbyist, then it most likely doesn't really matter anyways, but still I had a nice idea today.

I was thinking about a "piece" or exercise type piece that I would like to develop, at least for myself right now, that would present various technical challenges and techniques that we come across in various pieces that we play and learn.

For example, I'm just now really getting into thumb damping techniques, which is rather late for my journey in cg, but over the last year I've gotten better and more comfortable with various damping techniques. Pizzicato is sometimes a challenge depending on the piece. Another thing is the 'Segoviesc' stopping a chord and then having only the melody playing, most likely with a little vibrato on it. Then there's countless other things like various timing and such, scale runs, playing rest stroke melody with free stroke bass, etc, etc.

So I'm thinking of developing a piece or maybe a few pieces that would try and encompass all or many of those techniques, so that I have an sort of exercise to go through to warm up on all the various techniques in one giant piece or something.

Oh, I forgot harmonics, both natural and artificial and also playing them with accompanying basses like Llobet did through many of his arrangements, etc.

I feel that these skills should be practiced until they are completely second nature so that when they are presented in various pieces we won't have to stop and learn them or will at least have some good solid practice with them.

I suppose it would really just be called a study, but another idea I had was kind of jotting down the sections in various pieces where these various techniques present themselves and kind of going through these areas or bars to practice each of those techniques.

For example, if I want to practice playing or warming up on artificial harmonics played with bass notes, I could refer and practice the section in El Testament D Amelia or if I wanted to practice a pizzicato run I could just play the opening scale of Turina's Fandanguillo, etc.
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SunnyDee
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by SunnyDee » Mon Apr 24, 2017 11:50 pm

I love this idea. I hope you'll share it with us.
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Henny
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by Henny » Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:47 am

the idea is not bad in itself but it looks like a shortcut that is not giving you the desired result.
what is the advantage over having simple technical exercises to focus on what you want to achieve.
in my opinion simplex exercises where you really focus are more beneficial, every day work, patience , dedication works for me the best.

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georgemarousi
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by georgemarousi » Fri Jun 16, 2017 11:36 am

Henny wrote:
Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:47 am
the idea is not bad in itself but it looks like a shortcut that is not giving you the desired result.
what is the advantage over having simple technical exercises to focus on what you want to achieve.
in my opinion simplex exercises where you really focus are more beneficial, every day work, patience , dedication works for me the best.

I totally agree.

Let me give you a personal example. I was struggling to play clearly the pull-on / pull-off section of Rumores de la caleta, with quite small progress. Then my teacher proposed me a 3-note intervals pull on/off exercise for all fingers, ie: G#-G-G#, G-F#-G, etc.. My improvement on the piece after the exercise was amazing !

After that experience, I am totally convinced that I have to focus on exercises in order to have faster and greater improvement on my technique. Note that I usually play pieces and I find exercises boring, so I write this advice as a reminder to myself too :)
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zupfgeiger
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by zupfgeiger » Fri Jun 16, 2017 11:57 am

Hey glassy

I read in another current thread of yours, which is going on btw, that you are in a midlife crisis and did not touch your guitar for quite a while. Now I am happy to learn that you have overcome your problems and even present new ideas of how to improve your practicing. Maybe the forum would be interested to know how you managed to get back on track.

Zupf
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johnd
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by johnd » Fri Jun 16, 2017 12:33 pm

Henny wrote:
Fri Jun 16, 2017 10:47 am
the idea is not bad in itself but it looks like a shortcut that is not giving you the desired result.
what is the advantage over having simple technical exercises to focus on what you want to achieve.
in my opinion simplex exercises where you really focus are more beneficial, every day work, patience , dedication works for me the best.
I get bored just working on exercises so I combine a piece I want to master with exercises that help with the piece. In other words I combine arpeggio exercises with a piece that contains arpeggios. Of course I am just playing for myself so I feel I am accomplishing something other than making noise!

kmurdick
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by kmurdick » Fri Jun 16, 2017 2:49 pm

In Aaron Shearer's older method (from the 60s) vol. 2. there is a wonderful etude in artificial harmonics. Also, Study In A Major written by Aaron Shearer (same book) is a great dampening etude. I use parts of this study for video on damping strings. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ytAP9T2 ... 9&index=11

Henny
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by Henny » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:49 am

hi johnd, i agree that for arpeggio or artificial harmonics exercises etc we can use all kinds of etudes but for specific problems like finger independance, synchronisation,picado, speed burst, scales, slurs they are in my daily technical exercises.
i do not think we improve while playing music but we advance when enlarging our technical toolkit

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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by Jack Douglas » Mon Jun 19, 2017 12:23 pm

Glassynails,

Glad you're back at practice. Stay with it. Hope you're on the way back to daily playing.

Jack
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zupfgeiger
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by zupfgeiger » Mon Jun 19, 2017 12:41 pm

Don't bother, Jack. How won't come back to his thread anyway.
The secret of getting ahead is getting started (Mark Twain)

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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by davekear » Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:10 pm

Henny wrote:
Mon Jun 19, 2017 7:49 am

i do not think we improve while playing music but we advance when enlarging our technical toolkit
You improve with both. I got a lot of my chops playing 4 hrs a night 6-7 days a week for years. There comes a time when you're just playing, when you reach another level. All of a sudden you're playing pieces effortlessly that you used to couldn't play. Zero in on those things that are weak, but play and watch, and enjoy the magic when it happens.

CactusWren
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Re: An interesting thought by Glassynails on technical developement piece

Post by CactusWren » Tue Jun 20, 2017 9:07 pm

I think this is a bad idea. The great thing about most etudes is they isolate one or two technical difficulties and hammer them. Therefore, you get lots of work (repetition: the mother of skill) on the difficulty. A piece full of hard parts, a "loaded piece," would in itself just be a PITA to play and any effective work it could provide would only come with isolating parts and repeating them. Which is pretty much standard operating practice anyway... but instead of the satisfaction of dealing with the hard measures and then coasting on the rest, everything would be hard. It would be like running in molasses. At least for me.

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