Best progressive etudes?

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Jason Hensley
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Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jason Hensley » Mon Apr 24, 2017 5:55 pm

I am wanting to know some opinions on the "best" progressive etudes. I know there are a few. I was going to go with Carcassi's 25 Etudes and actually started on the first Etude and am about halfway through it. I wanted to see some opinions first on if there are any progressive etudes that are better. Any and all information is welcome thank you.
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance. And barbarism must always ultimately triumph. - Robert E. Howard.

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Rick Yzaguirre
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Rick Yzaguirre » Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:40 am

I don't know about better, but F. Sor has some really pretty studies that don't get boring. Try opus 60.

Jason Hensley
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jason Hensley » Sat Apr 29, 2017 3:41 pm

RocketFuel wrote:I don't know about better, but F. Sor has some really pretty studies that don't get boring. Try opus 60.
\

After some thought and review of progressive etudes, I actually decided to go with Sor's so we are on the same page :). Thanks for the recommendation.
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance. And barbarism must always ultimately triumph. - Robert E. Howard.

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Yisrael van Handel
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Yisrael van Handel » Sat Apr 29, 2017 7:51 pm

Jason Hensley wrote:
RocketFuel wrote:I don't know about better, but F. Sor has some really pretty studies that don't get boring. Try opus 60.
\

After some thought and review of progressive etudes, I actually decided to go with Sor's so we are on the same page :). Thanks for the recommendation.
For progressive technical development and beautiful music, I do not know anything better than the Sor studies, starting with Opus 44 and Opus 60, then Opus 35 and Opus 31, and finally Opus 6 and Opus 29 in that order. Opus 44 and Opus 60 are easy, but progressively introduce technical skills. Opus 35 and 31 (in that order, Opus 35 first) are also highly playable, beautiful, and continue to build technique progressively. Opus 6 is no longer easy, and Opus 29 requires advanced technique (in short, these studies tend to be difficult). A group of us are studying Opus 60 together in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=109053. I have been playing for 8 years already, but I wanted to do a refresh of technique, and I found the Opus 60 exercises fantastic. I am developing very rapidly on account of them, especially in the right hand, to which I never paid much attention. That has changed completely now, due to my studying Opus 60 with the group.
Yisrael van Handel
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Jason Hensley
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jason Hensley » Sat Apr 29, 2017 9:27 pm

Yisrael van Handel wrote:
Jason Hensley wrote:
RocketFuel wrote:I don't know about better, but F. Sor has some really pretty studies that don't get boring. Try opus 60.
\

After some thought and review of progressive etudes, I actually decided to go with Sor's so we are on the same page :). Thanks for the recommendation.
For progressive technical development and beautiful music, I do not know anything better than the Sor studies, starting with Opus 44 and Opus 60, then Opus 35 and Opus 31, and finally Opus 6 and Opus 29 in that order. Opus 44 and Opus 60 are easy, but progressively introduce technical skills. Opus 35 and 31 (in that order, Opus 35 first) are also highly playable, beautiful, and continue to build technique progressively. Opus 6 is no longer easy, and Opus 29 requires advanced technique (in short, these studies tend to be difficult). A group of us are studying Opus 60 together in this thread: viewtopic.php?f=1&t=109053. I have been playing for 8 years already, but I wanted to do a refresh of technique, and I found the Opus 60 exercises fantastic. I am developing very rapidly on account of them, especially in the right hand, to which I never paid much attention. That has changed completely now, due to my studying Opus 60 with the group.
Thanks for that, the order is helpful as well as knowing about the group thread I think I will go ahead and join up :)
Out of Op.60 I have only learned the first Etude so far but obviously plan to continue I think the progression to these works are awesome.
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance. And barbarism must always ultimately triumph. - Robert E. Howard.

Nick Cutroneo
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Sat Apr 29, 2017 9:53 pm

The Brouwer studies are great (the old studies) - especially the first 10 of the bunch. 11-20 are great, but the first ten do a great job to developing and setting up a player's technique.
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

Jason Hensley
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jason Hensley » Sat Apr 29, 2017 10:27 pm

I was taking a good look at Brouwer as well, I don't mind his works so much some of his studies sound awesome!
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance. And barbarism must always ultimately triumph. - Robert E. Howard.

Nick Cutroneo
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Nick Cutroneo » Sun Apr 30, 2017 2:37 am

Jason Hensley wrote:I was taking a good look at Brouwer as well, I don't mind his works so much some of his studies sound awesome!
As a teacher, working with a student on these studies can be difficult. First it's very useful to have really high quality performance recordings of these pieces for the students to listen to so they can hear the potential in the music. Second because the harmonic language is far more complex than your other "typical" studies, they are hard for the student to digest. Technique wise, they are great initial technique builders -- but the compositional vocabulary is hard for some students.
Nick Cutroneo - Classical Guitarist, performer/teacher/suzuki instructor

Jason Hensley
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jason Hensley » Sun Apr 30, 2017 2:41 am

Nick Cutroneo wrote:
Jason Hensley wrote:I was taking a good look at Brouwer as well, I don't mind his works so much some of his studies sound awesome!
As a teacher, working with a student on these studies can be difficult. First it's very useful to have really high quality performance recordings of these pieces for the students to listen to so they can hear the potential in the music. Second because the harmonic language is far more complex than your other "typical" studies, they are hard for the student to digest. Technique wise, they are great initial technique builders -- but the compositional vocabulary is hard for some students.
Nick would you mind looking at my thread about technique or playing from pieces. I would really love to have your input and would love for you to discuss this with me!
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance. And barbarism must always ultimately triumph. - Robert E. Howard.

Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Sun Apr 30, 2017 3:01 am

It's easy to make some of the Brouwer studies sound terrible. When they come into focus they're a lot of fun and fascinating. Part of this is because of the harmonic language that Nick mentions.
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Rick Yzaguirre
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Rick Yzaguirre » Sun Apr 30, 2017 7:56 am

Google Icelandic school of guitar and look for the "methodology" section where they have a massive list of progressive pdfs, starts from preliminary to high grade. Very convenient set up. You can more or less find your level and go nuts. Those Brouwer studies say they're easy but they aren't; and Nick's right, without hearing them first you can't make heads or tails of things

Jason Hensley
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jason Hensley » Sun Apr 30, 2017 3:57 pm

RocketFuel wrote:Google Icelandic school of guitar and look for the "methodology" section where they have a massive list of progressive pdfs, starts from preliminary to high grade. Very convenient set up. You can more or less find your level and go nuts. Those Brouwer studies say they're easy but they aren't; and Nick's right, without hearing them first you can't make heads or tails of things
Yeah lol, I went and took a look at the sheet music and I'm not there with sight reading yet. I have trouble with rhythm really badly I suppose still, I guess I need to work on it more, this look into etudes and such made me realize a couple flaws and kind of took me down a notch.
Barbarism is the natural state of mankind. Civilization is unnatural. It is a whim of circumstance. And barbarism must always ultimately triumph. - Robert E. Howard.

CactusWren
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by CactusWren » Tue May 02, 2017 4:51 pm

I enjoyed Stanley Yates' repertoire series. Quite logical and certainly enough work to keep you busy, if you attend to the details.

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Yisrael van Handel
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Yisrael van Handel » Tue May 02, 2017 5:46 pm

Jason Hensley wrote:
Sun Apr 30, 2017 3:57 pm
I went and took a look at the sheet music and I'm not there with sight reading yet. I have trouble with rhythm really badly I suppose still, I guess I need to work on it more, this look into etudes and such made me realize a couple flaws and kind of took me down a notch.
Oh, I did not take that into account. In that case I recommend that you proceed as follows.
  1. Find Aaron Shearer's Classical Guitar Technique, Volume I and II on the Internet. These were published in 1937 and are now in the public domain.
  2. Go through those two books slowly. Learn to read, count the rhythm of, and play each piece correctly before you go on to the next piece. All the instructions are there. At this point, I think it is not necessary to memorize the pieces. Better to read them from the music.
  3. When you have finished Shearer's Volume I and II, do the same with Sor's Opus 60 (available on this site and elsewhere for free). You should now know enough that you will be able to learn the Sor exercises in Opus 60: make sure you can read, count, and play each one before you go on to the next one.
  4. In parallel to the above, look for a good musician and teacher who can guide you. A teacher does not have to be a brilliant guitarist, but they should be a very knowledgeable musician and an inspiring teacher.
Shearer's technique for the right hand is out-of-date, but that does not matter yet. You can correct that later by studying Käppel's and Stanley Yates' technique books.
My guess is that the entire process will take you more than a year and less than two years. Do not play more than 30 minutes at a time until your technique has been reviewed by a knowledgeable guitarist. Press lightly with left-hand fingers and minimally with left-hand thumb.
I hope this helps.
Yisrael van Handel
Modi'in Ilit, Israel

Jack Douglas
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Re: Best progressive etudes?

Post by Jack Douglas » Tue May 02, 2017 9:37 pm

Love Shearer's technique books. Take a look at 24 Ferdinand Carulli Preludes. They are easy to read and to me seem like musical versions of the 120 Guiliani Arpeggio exercises.

As the gentleman above, Mr Handel said, 'Get a knowledgeable classical guitarist to review your technique before plowing into these or any other exercises. It's easy to hurt yourself if you haven't had proper training; hint, go for some lessons.
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