Arling Shaeffer meantone tremolo question

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Smudger5150
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Arling Shaeffer meantone tremolo question

Post by Smudger5150 » Thu Jun 15, 2017 12:12 pm

I've been working through the Arling Shaeffer tutor one can get online and the description of tremolo in there is unlike anything I've seen before.
It talks about passing the finger swinging and picking the treble string or strings (if doing it over more than 1 string!).

Have I understood correctly what the tutor is describing? In other words, is it describing something quite different from the usual p a m i (and variations)?

And is the technique mentioned, assuming I understand it correctly, used anywhere?

It sounds more like a variation on rasguedo techniques to me but please correct me if I've lost the plot!! :?
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"If I don’t practice for a day, I know it. If I don’t practice for two days, the critics know it. And if I don’t practice for three days, the public knows it." Louis Armstrong

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Arling Shaeffer meantone tremolo question

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Thu Jun 15, 2017 2:45 pm

I think you'll find what he is talking about is what now we would call tremolando, e.g. an un-timed repetition as distinct from the timed pami (etc) of normal tremolo.
It sounds a bit like he heard somebody playing normal tremolo and this is how he thought it went. But it looks like an interesting resource and I'll into the material more.
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franks59
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Re: Arling Shaeffer meantone tremolo question

Post by franks59 » Thu Jun 15, 2017 7:10 pm

I read this section and yes, he's not talking pami. He's talking about using the finger as a pick and generating tremolo by hitting the string back and forth as you would with a pick, or as you would on a mandolin.

I notice that he also produced an instruction book for mandolin so I'm betting that's where he got it from. But who knows, maybe in those days, that's how tremolo was done on guitar.

Frank

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Arling Shaeffer meantone tremolo question

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Thu Jun 15, 2017 7:24 pm

franks59 wrote:
Thu Jun 15, 2017 7:10 pm
I read this section and yes, he's not talking pami. He's talking about using the finger as a pick and generating tremolo by hitting the string back and forth as you would with a pick, or as you would on a mandolin.

I notice that he also produced an instruction book for mandolin so I'm betting that's where he got it from. But who knows, maybe in those days, that's how tremolo was done on guitar.

Frank
Well its copyright 1895 so that's right when Tarrega was with the Recuerdos approach to tremolo, so I suspect this was a technique particular to this writer and his circle and perhaps, location. It isn't written out as a timed number of notes, rather as the abbreviated form, so its not entirely clear whether he was aiming for a specific number of notes per beat, however we want to to call them! Certainly it makes sense that his mandolin involvement might have influenced him, and I wonder whether a mandolinist at this time would have used the same terminology, and whether they would have expected to rhythmicise the trem ... or just do it as fast as possible.
Simon Ambridge Series 40 (2005)
Trevor Semple Series 88 (1992)
Louis Panormo (1838)
Alexander Batov Baroque Guitar (2013)

Smudger5150
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Re: Arling Shaeffer meantone tremolo question

Post by Smudger5150 » Thu Jun 15, 2017 10:32 pm

Thanks for your input everyone. The mandolin influence seems possible.
There are a few of these type of older tutors knocking about there in the ether and I assumed that they were all singing from the same CG technique hymn sheet, so to speak. But clearly that's not always the case.

The only piece I've been introduced to using anything remotely similar to what is described is in Steve Howe's Mood for a day. My old guitar teacher pointed out a very small part where a similar kind of strumming was done. I must revisit that piece because I never really finished it (due to CG exam pieces) and my memory of what my teacher was advising might be blurry. But I vaguely remember the a finger was involved.
"Music washes away the dust of every day life." Art Blakey

"If I don’t practice for a day, I know it. If I don’t practice for two days, the critics know it. And if I don’t practice for three days, the public knows it." Louis Armstrong

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