Learning the Fretboard

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Smudger5150
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by Smudger5150 » Tue Jun 27, 2017 10:18 am

dtoh wrote:
Tue Jun 27, 2017 12:49 am
....... I'm sure it's not intentional but I kind of feel like advanced players regard learning the fretboard as a rite of passage or hazing ritual that needs to be kept as difficult as possible. :D
:lol: It feels like this to me for quite a few techniques on the guitar!
Or rather like -
(in English Yorkshire accent) 'When I was a lad, I had to learn tremolo using p i m a m i in the 17th position, in the dark, with my hands tied behind me back and woe betide me if I played the wrong right hand fingering....'
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bear
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by bear » Tue Jun 27, 2017 2:54 pm

corius wrote:
Mon Jun 26, 2017 8:50 pm
Thanks for the help everyone, some really great ideas to try out. I really appreciate the effort to which you've all gone.

I woke up this morning reciting position mnemonics and fingering octaves on my pillow. My wife is growing increasingly concerned!
If you're reciting mnemonics, remember there are no "natural" notes on 11th. There is only 1 on the 4th fret and 1 on the 6th fret.
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kmurdick
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by kmurdick » Tue Jun 27, 2017 3:52 pm

detoh says, "If you recall the first exercises you did when starting the guitar, they were typically adjacent notes on a single string, then on two strings, etc. That's what you need to most easily learn the higher positions on the fretboard. You could go back to the earliest exercises, but typically these are optimized for the first position and don't necessarily map well to a single string in the higher positions."

Go back and read my post. There is such a set of exercises and pieces.

musikai
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by musikai » Wed Jun 28, 2017 11:19 pm

A lot of good advices here.

I took the effort to modify the wonderful starting lessons by Sagreras for the higher notes to learn. This should get you started for the 5th and 7th position in a musically meaningful way.
Please tell us if it makes sense to you.

PDF can be downloaded here:
viewtopic.php?f=12&t=113582
Sagreras - modified scales - higher notes_1.png
Sagreras - modified scales - higher notes_2.png
Sagreras - modified scales - higher notes_3.png
Sagreras - modified scales - higher notes_4.png
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Last edited by musikai on Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Sagreras Gitarrenschule PDF
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See website link

Henny
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by Henny » Thu Jun 29, 2017 7:35 am

another suggestion i found somewhere is not for everyone but i use it now and it is logic.
Fretboard Harmony for University Study: Method and Historical Context by
Jeffrey James McFadden

he describes to take position 5 and 10 and learn the notes by heart as all the strings have natural notes.
then go from position 1 on every single string and name the natural notes starting with f on the e string then g etc...
he also gives exercises to practice.
:)

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SunnyDee
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by SunnyDee » Sat Jul 01, 2017 3:26 am

It's funny to me that when classical players say "learning the fretboard," they mean learning to match notes on a score to the fretboard. When non-classical players say "learning the fretboard," it has nothing to do with sheet music, it's just memorizing where notes and patterns of notes are on the fretboard in standard tuning.
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Daniel Penalva
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by Daniel Penalva » Sun Jul 16, 2017 1:54 pm

I heard Segovia's Scales are pretty useful to learn the freatboard, and it is good to practice improvisation :-D

meouzer
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by meouzer » Wed Jul 19, 2017 6:05 pm

I'm getting reacquainted with the fretboard after a long hiatus. I consider mnemonics to be too slow: direct sight is much faster. I memorized where all the C's are, which was easy. The once you have one note down go to another. I'm at C, A, D, and G, but making sure I have these down dead cold before I go on. Test by finding the notes left-right, top-down, etc. I know the five two octave scale shapes from Duncan (probably similar or same to Segovia's), so I don't need sheet music. I pick one shape and one root and play the scale no faster than I can say the notes. Dealing with sharps and flats makes you think.

Daniel Penalva
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by Daniel Penalva » Wed Jul 19, 2017 6:10 pm

meouzer wrote:
Wed Jul 19, 2017 6:05 pm
I'm getting reacquainted with the fretboard after a long hiatus. I consider mnemonics to be too slow: direct sight is much faster. I memorized where all the C's are, which was easy. The once you have one note down go to another. I'm at C, A, D, and G, but making sure I have these down dead cold before I go on. Test by finding the notes left-right, top-down, etc. I know the five two octave scale shapes from Duncan (probably similar or same to Segovia's), so I don't need sheet music. I pick one shape and one root and play the scale no faster than I can say the notes. Dealing with sharps and flats makes you think.
Segovia's Scales are pattern oriented, there is 8 patterns to 24 scales, so it relieves the difficult of memorizing. But i prefer to focus on scales that are in the key of some music.

davebones
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by davebones » Thu Jul 20, 2017 3:05 am

My original electric guitar teacher gave me printed pages with blank sections of fretboard, five positions per section. The task was to write the letter of any note on any one fret and then fill in the rest in relation to that note. This was in addition to doing many of the things listed by others. There is something about the act of writing that engages the memory on a different level. I found these exercises to always cause me to think and helped ingrain the moveable positions. I would second the emphasis on memorizing each string and playing scales, arpeggios, simple tunes, on just one string while naming the note you are playing out loud.

Henny
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by Henny » Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:07 pm

i agree with Davebones, use all the above suggestions and dedicate 10 minutes a day for it. with hard and regular training it comes slowly but it takes time and dedication.

kmurdick
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by kmurdick » Thu Jul 20, 2017 12:49 pm

I'm sure that there are people who have learned the fingerboard many different ways, but the most efficient way is the same way you learned the first position, i.e. one position at a time and one string at a time. And of course, through pieces that use these notes. Learning visualization techniques is also useful.

woodenhand
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by woodenhand » Fri Jul 21, 2017 3:24 am

Erik Zurcher wrote:
Sun Jun 25, 2017 8:22 pm
viewtopic.php?f=1&t=79606

Print these out, stick them to the wall and memorize a few every day.
Exactly. Honestly, I don't understand why there are so many complicated procedures proposed. You just put a fretboard diagram on your music stand along with whatever you're learning. Refer to the diagram only when you can't locate a note easily. As time passes, you'll find yourself referring to the diagram less and less... until you no longer need it. End of story.

Steve Langham
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by Steve Langham » Fri Jul 21, 2017 12:10 pm

Nicely put woodenhand - there's no secret special method. Start to sight read, start to learn pieces and look at the notation and slowly but surely you'll learn where the notes are on the guitar.

kmurdick
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Re: Learning the Fretboard

Post by kmurdick » Fri Jul 21, 2017 9:15 pm

Steve says: "Nicely put woodenhand - there's no secret special method. Start to sight read, start to learn pieces and look at the notation and slowly but surely you'll learn where the notes are on the guitar."

In my opinion, "slowly" is operative word here.

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