Memorizing Pieces

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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Rognvald
Posts: 76
Joined: Sat Jul 08, 2017 1:21 am

Re: Memorizing Pieces

Post by Rognvald » Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:53 pm

bensonm wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:41 pm
Rognvald wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 1:40 pm
Mike, your statement concerning knowledge of musical theory is essential to memorization. For example, when I initially look at a piece, I work out the chord progressions which tell me immediately where the piece is going. .. . especially in appregiated pieces where it is critical. However, if you try to memorize notes in isolation, it will take you much longer and you will never really understand a piece. A musician cannot progress beyond a rudimentary level if he/she does not understand music theory. . . unless you are a savant and it is intuitive. Any savants out there?? Playing again . . . Rognvald
Rognvald,

I know and it's on my to do list when I retire to finally get serious about learning music theory. If you have any suggestions on books, I'd love to hear them.

Mike
Hi, Mike,
One of the best books on Musical Theory I own that is well-written and easy to understand is: "Basic Principles Of Music Theory," by Joseph Brye, 1965, The Ronald Press Company. The cover and pages are tattered but remains one of my best sources for Music Theory. Highly recommended. Playing again . . . Rognvald
"And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Friedrich Nietzsche, Thus Spake Zarathustra

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fast eddie
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Re: Memorizing Pieces

Post by fast eddie » Tue Jul 18, 2017 4:29 am

My son who is in New York, teaches piano . We have had this discussion of how to quickly memorize music several times. One of his teachers told him to memorize a piece of music, you should work backwards from the end to the beginning. In other words, begin at the last measure (or small section) and memorize that until you can play it perfectly without looking at the notes. It is important that the movements of your hands and fingers be exactly correct (thus repeatable). Then proceed to the next to last measure (or small section) and do the same, and play it to the end. Continue this until you have the entire piece memorized. This builds your muscle movement into your brain. He tells the story of a student at Eastman who had perfect pitch and memorized by ear. Occasionally while playing, he would be 1 octave off. This was because his ear was running the show instead of his brain. Anyway, this may seem odd, but it is a well established method. My son swears by this method and I am trying this on a simple piece (Greensleeves).
Here is one reference to this method.
http://www.wikihow.com/Memorize-Sheet-Music a
Fast Eddie
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rojarosguitar
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Re: Memorizing Pieces

Post by rojarosguitar » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:00 am

bensonm wrote:
Wed Jun 28, 2017 7:27 pm
Despite the subject line, this post is not asking about how to memorize pieces. Rather, I'm interested in hearing the thoughts of others regarding why some pieces seem to be easier to memorize than others. For me, some pieces that are quite difficult for me to play correctly are still rather easy to memorize. For example, about a year ago I started on "A Day in November" by Brouwer. I can't remember exactly how long it took me to memorize it, but it wasn't long. Maybe a couple of weeks, and then I had it. (Couldn't really play it, but I knew what I was supposed to play.)
That's funny, because when I read the title of this thread I immediately thought of "Un Dia De Noviembre" by Brower. I started to play this tune at the same time as Lauros Valse #2. While to memorize Lauro was no problem at all for me, I have big problems to remember Un Dia, especially the easiest first part (second part, that is more demanding technically, seems to be easier to memorize). Very strange...
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...

bensonm
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 7:23 pm
Location: Cincinnati, OH

Re: Memorizing Pieces

Post by bensonm » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:21 pm

rojarosguitar wrote:
Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:00 am
bensonm wrote:
Wed Jun 28, 2017 7:27 pm
Despite the subject line, this post is not asking about how to memorize pieces. Rather, I'm interested in hearing the thoughts of others regarding why some pieces seem to be easier to memorize than others. For me, some pieces that are quite difficult for me to play correctly are still rather easy to memorize. For example, about a year ago I started on "A Day in November" by Brouwer. I can't remember exactly how long it took me to memorize it, but it wasn't long. Maybe a couple of weeks, and then I had it. (Couldn't really play it, but I knew what I was supposed to play.)
That's funny, because when I read the title of this thread I immediately thought of "Un Dia De Noviembre" by Brower. I started to play this tune at the same time as Lauros Valse #2. While to memorize Lauro was no problem at all for me, I have big problems to remember Un Dia, especially the easiest first part (second part, that is more demanding technically, seems to be easier to memorize). Very strange...
Yes, it is strange. For some reason, I found Un Dia very easy to memorize, but this little piece by Lopes, "Cancao Triste," still gives me problems even though it is so simple I could almost sight read it from the very start.
Michael L. Benson
Cervantes Rodriguez Concert
Aria AC60

bensonm
Posts: 41
Joined: Mon Jul 20, 2015 7:23 pm
Location: Cincinnati, OH

Re: Memorizing Pieces

Post by bensonm » Tue Jul 18, 2017 6:22 pm

Rognvald wrote:
Mon Jul 17, 2017 2:53 pm
bensonm wrote:
Sun Jul 16, 2017 5:41 pm
Rognvald wrote:
Sat Jul 08, 2017 1:40 pm
Mike, your statement concerning knowledge of musical theory is essential to memorization. For example, when I initially look at a piece, I work out the chord progressions which tell me immediately where the piece is going. .. . especially in appregiated pieces where it is critical. However, if you try to memorize notes in isolation, it will take you much longer and you will never really understand a piece. A musician cannot progress beyond a rudimentary level if he/she does not understand music theory. . . unless you are a savant and it is intuitive. Any savants out there?? Playing again . . . Rognvald
Rognvald,

I know and it's on my to do list when I retire to finally get serious about learning music theory. If you have any suggestions on books, I'd love to hear them.

Mike
Hi, Mike,
One of the best books on Musical Theory I own that is well-written and easy to understand is: "Basic Principles Of Music Theory," by Joseph Brye, 1965, The Ronald Press Company. The cover and pages are tattered but remains one of my best sources for Music Theory. Highly recommended. Playing again . . . Rognvald
Thanks for the tip. I'm getting a copy through my library.
Michael L. Benson
Cervantes Rodriguez Concert
Aria AC60

dtoh
Posts: 197
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:54 pm

Re: Memorizing Pieces

Post by dtoh » Fri Jul 21, 2017 4:19 pm

I may have mentioned this in another thread, but I have a friend who's a concert pianist. He claims he never consciously tries to a memorize a piece. He says it just sticks naturally after he's practiced it for a while. Must be nice.

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