Arpeggios studies

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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For discussion of studies, scales, arpeggios and theory.
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Guitar Slim Jr.
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Joined: Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:53 pm

Re: Arpeggios studies

Post by Guitar Slim Jr. » Thu Jul 06, 2017 3:20 am

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Last edited by Guitar Slim Jr. on Thu Jul 06, 2017 3:26 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Guitar Slim Jr.
Posts: 47
Joined: Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:53 pm

Re: Arpeggios studies

Post by Guitar Slim Jr. » Thu Jul 06, 2017 3:24 am

Rick Beauregard wrote:
Wed Jul 05, 2017 10:38 pm
Paul Janssen wrote:
Wed Jul 05, 2017 9:37 pm
Rick Beauregard wrote:
Tue Jul 04, 2017 11:28 pm


That's the one. Thanks Michael.
It's funny that you should suggest this one when you did as I just started playing this yesterday before I read this post. Very nice little study that sounds good both at a slower tempo and sped up. There's also the interesting twist with the change in time signature from 3/4 to 2/4 at the end which takes some getting used to.
Yes and I actually like it not played too fast, though that's a good exercise for sure. That time change is one of the things that makes it so nice musically imho.
Just a word of warning to anyone trying this for the first time -- be careful about left-hand fingerings and positions. The idea is to maintain a cross-string picking pattern throughout, without ever playing two notes on the same string (except the bass, of course). The only way to do that is by closely observing string designations. If you see an F# to be played on the 3rd string (11th fret), that's where you've got to play it to get the picking pattern to work out properly. It's a tricky read in places, although relatively easy to play once figured out.

KBell
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Joined: Wed Jan 11, 2017 5:30 pm

Re: Arpeggios studies

Post by KBell » Thu Jul 06, 2017 7:30 pm

For students, the Brouwer #6 is a great study for both rh & lh...the repeating pattern for the rh is very good for the travelling across the strings as Slim noted but you also have to ensure the notes produced by the open string have a tone & volume that is consistent relative to the fretted notes

...for the LH, it's great for ensuring you're on the finger tips so they don't accidentally mute/dampen the open strings

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