Andres Segovia

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
Forum rules
IV Laws governing the quotation/citation of music


For discussion of studies, scales, arpeggios and theory.
Logan

Post by Logan » Thu Jun 28, 2007 4:02 am

I think most of the problem people have with Segovia Is that they can't take off their modern ears and listen to the works in a historical context. While Segovia did die in 1987, thus living the vast majority of his life in the 20th century he is however a child of the romantic school. He hung around with, Llobet, was a fan of Tarrega, and while he did play works by modern composers, they were composition definately based in Neo-Romanticism.
Let's jump ahead 50 years if someone like say- Scott Tenant is still alive will the new breed of guitarists be having the same debates.
Segovia's Ego was annoying but of little consequence, he was a great guitarist who possessed amazing skills for transcription, and his positive impact on the instrument cannot be denied, Period, regardless of what he thought of himself or perhaps what we think he thought of himself. I like his Bach, and the way he played Bach was very much in vouge. Look at other instrumentalists who were contemporarties of Segovia, such as Heifietz, or Menuhin, hey all played Bach the same way, tons of Rubato and very Romantic like. That was the vocabulary of the day, and they spoke it well.

farhad

Post by farhad » Thu Jun 28, 2007 11:06 am

You are 100% right.I never thought of that.As far as I know nowadays the majority of young guitar players focus on technical stuff like playing fast or playing difficult pieces that other people can't play.But as you said it was very differrent in Segovia's time.

User avatar
charlesivey
Posts: 1983
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 5:48 am
Location: Texas

Post by charlesivey » Thu Jun 28, 2007 6:03 pm

Context is gained from greater information, maturity, and reflection. There will never be another Plato, Euclid, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, Mozart, Perlman, Caruso, Casals, Babe Ruth, ad infinitum, ... , and there will never be another Segovia. There may well be better practioners of each of these historical figures' areas of recognition -- one hopes so. There will be additional people who walk on the moon, probably with better suits that allow more grace, but Armstrong was the first.
CI

"Things should be made as simple as possible, but not any simpler" A. Einstein

farhad

Post by farhad » Thu Jun 28, 2007 6:56 pm

Someone asked Newton "How did you get all these achievements in fields of maths man physics?" And he said "I'm just standing on shoulders of giants"
That's the way.Every new achievement or something extraordinary is the result of some achievements in the past-whether successful or not.And each one is unique in its own way.In my opinion every artist who has put a lot of effort into something is different.Some of them never get famous,but nonetheless they are great.

hdo1

Post by hdo1 » Thu Jun 28, 2007 11:28 pm

farhad wrote:You are 100% right.I never thought of that.As far as I know nowadays the majority of young guitar players focus on technical stuff like playing fast or playing difficult pieces that other people can't play.But as you said it was very differrent in Segovia's time.
Very true>>>Listening to Ana Vidovic's Bach makes me feel exhausted, unlike Bach's music played by Segovia, John Williams, Pepe Romero or David Rusell, their interpretation of Bach is so enchanting. Before I play any piece of Bach transcribed for guitars, I always listen to them played on the instruments which they are originally written for, eg violins or lutes, to get the proper musical phrasing. (Obviously the first step is to learn the piece well technically and memorise all the important passages.)

hdo1

Post by hdo1 » Fri Jun 29, 2007 1:59 am

farhad wrote:Someone asked Newton "How did you get all these achievements in fields of maths man physics?" And he said "I'm just standing on shoulders of giants"
That's the way.Every new achievement or something extraordinary is the result of some achievements in the past-whether successful or not.And each one is unique in its own way.In my opinion every artist who has put a lot of effort into something is different.Some of them never get famous,but nonetheless they are great.
Well said :bravo: :bravo: :bravo:

User avatar
freestroke
Posts: 1587
Joined: Wed Jun 07, 2006 7:20 pm
Location: Rome, New York

Re: Segovia

Post by freestroke » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:27 am

cn90 wrote:
3. Tireless concertizing even before his death.
But then he really hit his stride!
Hell is full of amateur musicians -- GB Shaw

Logan

Post by Logan » Fri Jun 29, 2007 2:48 am

charlesivey wrote:Context is gained from greater information, maturity, and reflection. There will never be another Plato, Euclid, Galileo, Newton, Einstein, Mozart, Perlman, Caruso, Casals, Babe Ruth, ad infinitum, ... , and there will never be another Segovia. There may well be better practioners of each of these historical figures' areas of recognition -- one hopes so. There will be additional people who walk on the moon, probably with better suits that allow more grace, but Armstrong was the first.



Well put Charles. Some people we mourn because there will never be another, and some we thank God!

Sean

On Segovia

Post by Sean » Fri Jun 29, 2007 3:00 pm

I believe Segovia was a great guitarist, but is more important for his appeal to composers of respect to write new music for an instrument that was considered by many as insignificant. This fact places Segovia on a pedestal.

As far as musicianship, Segovia was, again, a great guitarist. I was brought up in the literature he garnered for the instrument. That said, the man did some things I thought strange. He often placed pauses within a piece that failed to show in the score, and his phrasing was sometimes bizarre (opinion).

flamenca blanca

Post by flamenca blanca » Sat Jun 30, 2007 12:41 pm

Sean,

You reply in stereo quite often. I'm surprised you have kind words about Segovia. You've stated elsewhere a bit of distain for the Jedi Master.

Yup, if Segovia were Yoda, which guitar player would be Anakin Skywalker? Qui Gonn Jin? Mace Windu? Luke Skywalker?

:lol:

DanieleMagli

Post by DanieleMagli » Sun Jul 01, 2007 10:54 pm

I have listened Segovia in concert at Venice in 1985 when he was 93 years old. He played Granados Maya de Goya, Ponce sonatina meridional, Moreno-Torroba, Tansmann.... It was a great experience that inspired me a lot

guitarforthejuan

Post by guitarforthejuan » Sat Jul 14, 2007 10:29 pm

I have to agree with what somepeople have said here, he did many things for the guitar but he was not the greatest guitarist ever( in my opinion). I do enjoy his recordings of the spanish works, they are executed very well, but I must also say I love his recordings of Bach, I know the interpretation is technically wrong but I enjoy it.

Logan

Post by Logan » Sun Jul 15, 2007 4:09 am

guitarforthejuan wrote:I have to agree with what somepeople have said here, he did many things for the guitar but he was not the greatest guitarist ever( in my opinion). I do enjoy his recordings of the spanish works, they are executed very well, but I must also say I love his recordings of Bach, I know the interpretation is technically wrong but I enjoy it.
I agree I don't think he was the greatest guitarist ever. I think no one ever can claim that title, because there is no sure fire way to decide. I play a lot of golf and that's easy to decide who the better golfer is, if you get the ball in the cup with the least amount of strokes you are better! but how do you judge whose Bach is better when everybody hears something different.

khayes
Posts: 1196
Joined: Fri Sep 22, 2006 7:29 pm
Location: Middle Tennessee

Post by khayes » Sun Jul 15, 2007 8:16 pm

In golf, you may be better but only on that 1 day on that particular course! The next day, on another course, you might not be able to get the ball near the hole...a perfect analogy to the frustrations of CG.
Ken

Logan

Post by Logan » Mon Jul 16, 2007 1:28 am

khayes wrote:In golf, you may be better but only on that 1 day on that particular course! The next day, on another course, you might not be able to get the ball near the hole...a perfect analogy to the frustrations of CG.

yes that's true but you are still better, even if it is just for that day or that course. You can't judge a guitarist in such a way as to be defineative like that. There are too many variables to take into account. With Golf it's easy; your scorecard. In guitar it's all opinion.

Return to “Classical Guitar technique”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot], Yandex [Bot] and 16 guests