What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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For discussion of studies, scales, arpeggios and theory.
bernie

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by bernie » Sat Apr 12, 2008 7:13 pm

Is there a place where we can find a classification in function of the level for the different CG studies?

DanieleMagli

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by DanieleMagli » Sat Apr 19, 2008 9:59 pm

bernie wrote:Is there a place where we can find a classification in function of the level for the different CG studies?

That's a tipical one milion dollar question ! :)
Your teacher show you the way...
I have a classification for every composers but it is too long to say,
maybe I write about it in my web site .
For exemple Fernando Sor studies : op. 44 and op. 60 are enough easy for a secon or a third level . You can play op. 31 and op. 35 beetween third and five level. You will play op. 6 and op. 29 after sixth level till eighth .

Visit my web site
(sorry for my English)

Daniele Magli

dhim

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by dhim » Mon Apr 21, 2008 10:19 am

Try Trinity Guitar Guildhall Guitar books for these...

Alexo66

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by Alexo66 » Thu May 01, 2008 7:59 pm

Hey, can I just ask, what are the differences between the Chanterelle and Tecla editions of the Complete Sor Studies? Which one would you recommend?

Thanks,
Alex

Louise Wilson

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by Louise Wilson » Fri Feb 13, 2009 3:42 am

There is quite a recent thread, called 'five days of Sor', where a prominent teacher has listed a set of Sor studies to do each day (some well past my capability, so I'll just leave them', and it's then recommended to get them 'up to speed'. Take a look at that thread, and see if they would 'fit' for you as being 'essential.

bruciekins

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by bruciekins » Mon Feb 16, 2009 7:48 pm

I don't see any of the studies as essential, but all of the studies mentioned are useful, in as much as they all address particular aspects of guitar playing (which is what a study does- one will concentrate on scales, another on arpeggios, or tremolo, ligados, chording, melody with accompaniment etc.) A good place to start would be Frederick Noad's "100 graded classical guitar studies" which is a selection of studies from the great guitarists of the classical period (Sor, Giuliani and Carcassi). All of them are musically good, and far more interesting than dry exercises. Some of them are even played in concert or on recordings.

Peter_C

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by Peter_C » Wed Feb 18, 2009 7:44 pm

bernie wrote:Is there a place where we can find a classification in function of the level for the different CG studies?
I've wondered this too. The Segovia 20 have a huge variance in level, in my opinion. They are most certainly NOT in order of increasing difficulty, despite what someone once told me :roll:

Another thing I've wished existed is a "overview" level reference for what technique, exactly, each study is meant to (or happens to) focus on. If organized by technique, and included all of the studies Daniele listed, this could possibly be an awesome resource. Hell, put it online and let me cross-reference by difficulty level (even level ranges). That would be AWESOME 8)

... anyone up for a database programming project??

CC323

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by CC323 » Sun Mar 01, 2009 5:29 pm

I'm surprised that the Legnani Caprices haven't been mentioned yet. Those are some very musically rewarding, fairly difficult etudes in my opinion. I think that they're right up there with Villa Lobos in some cases personally.

Take Care,

Chris

Leendavid89
Posts: 11
Joined: Mon Aug 21, 2017 9:55 pm

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by Leendavid89 » Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:45 pm

I don't want to blaspheme here, but I would skip playing any types of exhaustive studies. That is, once you have basic technique. This you could get fro Giuliani 120 studies and selective Carcassi OP 60. I guess a lot depends on how much time you have. Any piece, even a study, requires a commitment to learn and time to maintain it. My main suggestion on repertoire would be to work with a teacher, listen to pieces and learn the ones that you really like. Playing guitar should be about beautiful music and not gymnastics. Music is the goal.

henders
Posts: 106
Joined: Sat Jan 22, 2011 2:49 am
Location: California, USA

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by henders » Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:22 am

Leendavid89 wrote:
Thu Sep 21, 2017 1:45 pm
I don't want to blaspheme here, but I would skip playing any types of exhaustive studies. That is, once you have basic technique. This you could get fro Giuliani 120 studies and selective Carcassi OP 60. I guess a lot depends on how much time you have. Any piece, even a study, requires a commitment to learn and time to maintain it. My main suggestion on repertoire would be to work with a teacher, listen to pieces and learn the ones that you really like. Playing guitar should be about beautiful music and not gymnastics. Music is the goal.
Yes, agree. If music is your hobby and not your profession, then it's all about the time. You don't have much.

skipintro
Posts: 46
Joined: Sat Jun 08, 2013 2:18 pm
Location: Derbyshire

Re: What are the essential classical guitar studies?

Post by skipintro » Mon Sep 25, 2017 7:31 am

henders wrote:
Mon Sep 25, 2017 5:22 am
...........
Yes, agree. If music is your hobby and not your profession, then it's all about the time. You don't have much.
Tautology? If you mean professional "classical" guitarist then yes you may have to follow the somewhat masochistic "correct" progression through the conventional material.
Personally I think many beginners are easily put off by this route (I know I was).
Instead (as well) I think it's helpful to spend a lot of time in the comfort zone learning to play simple stuff well, rather than difficult stuff badly.
Just an example but I've just discovered "The_Nonpareil Guitar Folio" (W Stahl) (thanks to Marieh on another thread) and there is masses of other entertaining and interesting easy material which gets ignored by the serious would-be "classical" guitarists.
Start with nursery rhymes (hymns, light music, whatever turns you on) and more importantly - keep going back to them!
To quote Leendavid89 above "Playing guitar should be about beautiful music and not gymnastics. Music is the goal."

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