Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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2handband
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by 2handband » Mon Feb 20, 2017 3:45 pm

I don't think it's a detriment at all. Right now I am doing a two-month stint with a Deep Purple/Rainbow tribute while their regular guitar player recovers from surgery (which is why I've been kinda scarce here lately). I'm going out and doing those shows and then sitting down with my classical and it's a pretty seamless transition. The only issue is that I'm playing stuff Ritchie Blackmore was on and trying to keep it as real as I can and he did a bunch of stuff with his fingers. I find with nails on an electric I have to hold my hand at kind of a funny angle to fingerpick. That is however a minor problem and one that wasn't hard to solve.

RectifiedGTRz
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by RectifiedGTRz » Wed Mar 29, 2017 3:52 pm

i regularly play electric guitar: rock, metal, etc. I also also play bass, rock keyboards, banjo and also was classically trained to play classical.

Neither hampers the other. In fact I would say I was able to pick up banjo so quickly due to playing so many RH exercises on classical!

Don't let anyone tell you you can't do all types of music because it hampers the other.
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robin loops
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by robin loops » Wed Mar 29, 2017 7:12 pm

RectifiedGTRz wrote:i regularly play electric guitar: rock, metal, etc. I also also play bass, rock keyboards, banjo and also was classically trained to play classical.

Neither hampers the other. In fact I would say I was able to pick up banjo so quickly due to playing so many RH exercises on classical!

Don't let anyone tell you you can't do all types of music because it hampers the other.
I completely agree. I can't figure out why some consider 'classical guitarist' and 'musician' to be mutually exclusive.
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Simon the Pieman
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by Simon the Pieman » Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:19 pm

I play both and also steel string acoustic. I suppose if you were playing mainly electric, then coming back to classical, you would find the neck width and string spacing on a classical difficult to get used to. But other than that, the main difference is in the right hand. Personally, I find that my classical right hand technique helps with my electric/acoustic plectrum technique - but NOT the other way round ! So I overemphasise practicing classical at the expense of steel string plectrum. It works for me. Whatever way round you do it, your left hand is always getting a good work out - and if you play a lot of legato on electric, this can strengthen your fingers and stretch them in a way which is not so common on classical. Just watch out for tapping technique - easy to damage right hand nails.

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Steve Kutzer
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by Steve Kutzer » Mon Apr 10, 2017 1:47 pm

I play a bit of steel string acoustic and fingerstyle Jazz chord melody on an archtop with flatwound stings. The archtop is physically the easiest guitar I have played, and flatwounds are similar in feel to nylon.

But I have limited time, and so I usually play 90% of one for 3 months or so, and the usual winner is classical. Steel strings are a little rough on the RH nails and the LH callouses can be a bit of a bother when going back to nylon. But other than that, I see no problem. Developing chord melody arrangements has made me concentrate more on theory and has thus made me a better overall musician. And it's nice to have freedom, rather than playing a score note for note.
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fast eddie
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Re: Can electric guitar technique hamper my classical technique?

Post by fast eddie » Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:59 am

I do not play electric guitar, but in watching a BBC film about John Williams, a segment included his time with the rock group Sky during the 1980's. At this time he sometimes played an electric guitar, which was shown on the film. John said his classical guitar technique did not transfer to the electric. In the film a bass player in the group said that John was obviously out of his comfort zone on the electric, but praised his musical skills. John himself said in the film that at the time he was voted in a magazine to be one of the best electric guitarist during this time. He said that this was totally absurd that he probably should not be in the top 1,000. I found that interesting.
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