Cavatina--rest strokes?

Classical Guitar technique: studies, scales, arpeggios, theory
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blevinsjake
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Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by blevinsjake » Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:04 pm

I'm having a little problem "bringing out" the melody in Myers's Cavatina. I'm playing it all with free strokes. Should the melody be brought out with rest strokes instead or is just an issue of accentuating the melody free strokes? Trying to figure out where to best devote my efforts.

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Jose-Guitarra8a
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by Jose-Guitarra8a » Mon Feb 11, 2013 3:13 pm

For me, rest strokes in this particular piece tends to overwhelming. I try to add a bit more weight to my free stroke finger instead of a rest stroke.

Noadman
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by Noadman » Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:11 pm

The same goes for me. I think rest strokes would increase the difficulty, and that it's more economical to try to bring out the melody with more emphasis on those free strokes.
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Denian Arcoleo
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by Denian Arcoleo » Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:39 pm

I use a light rest stroke for the melody because I feel this achieves exactly what rest stroke is good for, bringing out the melody. You can hear what it sounds like on youtube (search for Stanley Myers -Cavatina Denian Arcoleo)

blevinsjake
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by blevinsjake » Mon Feb 11, 2013 6:42 pm

That does sound very good.

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singvomblatt
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by singvomblatt » Mon Feb 11, 2013 11:30 pm

Another beautiful performance, Denian, thank you. I just listen to it. You are right on with rest strokes on the melody !!

Yes I think, this piece one should have on the list in the repertoire. Many people have heard it. It is emotionally loaded with feelings attached to the movie "the deer hunter". The same thing with Romance anonymous, which is know through the movie "Jeux interdid".

Why? I think this could be an ice-breaker for those who are normally not so deeply involved into classical music and rather listen to other stuff. A performer sometimes has to act like a magician. First play something people know, even in their unconscuesness. Then, they will listen to more, even unfamiliar sounds or rhythms. But; then, you have to come back again to familiar things. It is a risk you take. People nowadays are so used to press a button and music is available everywhere without a thought of how hard it is for a serious musician to learn a piece till its ready to be performed. It is kind of sad though.
Sooner or later I will be able to play it. But it will still be a long while and I don't know it it even will be so beautiful like yours.
Last edited by singvomblatt on Wed Feb 13, 2013 10:33 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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vinhngo
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by vinhngo » Tue Feb 12, 2013 11:34 am

Just try and experiment :) What works for other doesn't mean it works for you. I personally play it with light rest strokes. It creates a distinct sound that is clear from the arpeggio accompaniment. I have to keep those rest strokes from being overwhelming though.
Lean your body forward slightly to support the guitar against your chest, for the poetry of the music should resound in your heart.

-Andres Segovia-

Check out my youtube channel for more performances: http://www.youtube.com/user/ffgghhj77

zenking

Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by zenking » Wed Feb 13, 2013 9:28 pm

Rest strokes are key to bring out the melody. Especially in the beginning, the rest strokes would not interfere with the arpeggiating since they are in opoosite directions.

Practice it verly slowly with rest strokes then in no time you will be able to do it very naturally. I've played the piece for many years and it really came to life when I incorprated rest strokes.

zenking

blevinsjake
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by blevinsjake » Thu Feb 14, 2013 3:15 am

Thanks all for the response. I think the light rest stroke is the way I'm going to go. I've tried it and I do think it remedies my problem. Still, using rest strokes after free strokes for so long is sounding a bit clunky right now. In a few weeks, I might post a youtube and get your take on how it's developed. Thanks again; as a new member on the forum, let me say that this is a wonderful, wonderful resource.

Jake

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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by Dofpic » Sat Mar 16, 2013 3:13 pm

Any tips on how to achieve a legato melody and accompaniment with all the bar chords? It always sounds choked when I play it and hard to practice the bar chords slowly?? Any ideas here?
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johnwmclean
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Re: Cavatina--rest strokes?

Post by johnwmclean » Wed Jul 12, 2017 10:02 pm

Bringing this thread back to life again...
I once again picked this piece up again after a break of several years. With this particular piece I've simplified my right hand technique by completely eliminating the a finger of the right hand. Lightly rest stroking mostly with the i finger allows for greater tone control with the melodic line, in turn it has taken away some of my left hand issues.

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