Which way of support do you prefer?

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
edcat7
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby edcat7 » Sun Jan 01, 2017 2:49 pm

I have the de oro suction cup support too but don't like the way it leaves a mark on my guitar. It slips also. Playing at home is not a problem, I have low enough stools and foot supports in the way of thick books. I even have something similar to what bear uses, except it's not foldable. I just looked for the foldable ones on the bay and are too expensive.
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Briant
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Briant » Sun Jan 01, 2017 6:09 pm

I use a Dynarette Cushion. I have found that best method to find the best playing position is ti use an adjustable chair. Ideally my thigh must be in a position that is parallel to the floor, this means that my chair height has to lower than normally found with a standard chair.
I was going to get the saw out but my wife objected so i have now bought an adjustable office chair without side arms.

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CG-phile
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby CG-phile » Sun Jan 01, 2017 7:41 pm

Jeffrey Armbruster wrote:The Dynarette with a low left foot support--like a thick book--works pretty well for me. I like that the cushion is risk free for your guitar and doesn't require installation. But I can't quite get the angle that I like best with this. So close...I'm still looking.

I too use the Dynarette support in combination with a low support for my left foot as I find this to be the most ergonomic. To solve the foot angle issue, I use an angled nursing stool, as in the attached photo, and it's perfect for me.

Nursing Stool.png
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Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Jeffrey Armbruster » Sun Jan 01, 2017 7:46 pm

That nursing stool is much better than the cinder block I tried. Anyone need a small cinder block? this combination is a little bit of 'neither one thing nor the other', perhaps. But I may end up going back to it.
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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Stephen Kenyon » Sun Jan 01, 2017 9:20 pm

Musicguy1515 wrote:Has anyone tried the Gitano Guitar support? I have heard this one is supposed to be good as well.


I have one on my lessons guitar and always recommend them to students who may benefit from a rest instead of a footstool. In the current version the suckers have lift tabs, avoiding the need to dig under to release them; and each packet has a square of stickyback plastic in case the instrument has a less-than glassy smooth finish, eg French polish.

I use an Arm'N'Track on my main guitars but they are not made anymore.
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bobmoore
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby bobmoore » Sun Jan 01, 2017 10:00 pm

Briant wrote:I use a Dynarette Cushion. I have found that best method to find the best playing position is ti use an adjustable chair. Ideally my thigh must be in a position that is parallel to the floor, this means that my chair height has to lower than normally found with a standard chair.
I was going to get the saw out but my wife objected so i have now bought an adjustable office chair without side arms.


I use the Flanger cushion which in appearance seems very much like the Dynarette. I love it. It holds on my leg very steady and doesn't slip. I tried one of those with suction cups, but they sometimes (very infrequently though) came loose. Mostly it worked however, so it's certainly useful.

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Christopher Freitag
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Christopher Freitag » Sun Jan 01, 2017 10:25 pm

+1 for the Kris Barnett support. I use it on both of my guitars, both luthier-built french polished instruments. I've used the Ergoplay and liked it well enough. The Dynarette cushion, even the larger size, was not big enough to position the guitar where I want it. I recently played a guitar with a Murata support and thought that was very good, but I can't get my head around the idea of clamping something to the guitar!

I'd never go back to a footstool...for me, the stress on the lower back is just too much.
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scottszone
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby scottszone » Mon Jan 02, 2017 5:36 am

I used a footstool in college till I started getting cramps in my left leg and lower back. The guitar always felt a little unstable like it could fall if I didn't support it with my right arm. Plus I was practicing 5+ hours a day and I just ached all over after a while.

I always used a strap on my acoustics and electrics before college and remembered how comfortable and at ease it was to keep the guitar in place. It felt like the guitar was an extension of my body. I talked to my teacher and he was fine with a strap, so I installed a couple $5 ebony strap buttons on my classical and have felt so much more comfortable ever since.

The luthier Kenny Hill performs with a strap and has some good reasoning behind it. I wish there wasn't a stigma attached to the strap buttons on classical guitars. They are barely noticeable and the option to use a strap saves a lot of wear and tear on the body. Plus I can answer my cell phone or walk to the kitchen with my guitar on for a quick coffee refill!

Any classical guitar of mine that's a keeper gets the strap buttons. You can get nice small ones in rosewood or ebony that blend with the guitar and are unobtrusive. I've tried everything and a strap is just the most comfortable for me by far. Plus my technique and tone have improved as I don't have to waste energy holding the guitar in place and I can make subtle adjustments in my hand and arm positions without strain.
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Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Jeffrey Armbruster » Mon Jan 02, 2017 6:13 am

scottszone: my local luthier told me that he would have to drill a hole in my guitar in order to install a button. Is that what you did?

I can totally see using a strap while sitting down (although I've never tried it!).
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scottszone
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby scottszone » Mon Jan 02, 2017 6:27 am

Yes Jeffrey, a tiny drill bit about 1/2 inch deep at the neck joint ground side. Just enough to get the wood screw started. Another one at the base of the guitar right in the middle. The screws are pretty sharp so you could probably just screw it in with a screwdriver, but the hole keeps the screw from shifting as you screw it in. Use a tape measure and a felt pen to mark the spots before you do it.

This all sounds more painful than it is. Takes about a minute and looks like it came from the luthier that way when you are done. Most strap buttons come with felt or rubber washers so the button doesn't mar the finish.

I use a Planet Waves black canvas guitar strap. The poly or nylon straps slide and don't hold the guitar up as well. The cotton canvas keeps the guitar in place even if I stand up. Most classical guitars are a little neck heavy so this is important. A leather strap would work too, but I find them too heavy.

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Dave Stott
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Dave Stott » Mon Jan 02, 2017 7:26 pm

I've been using and loving my DeOro guitar support for more than a year now. It's never slipped or left a mark on any of my guitars. Any "suction marks" wipe off easy. My Cordoba guitars have polyurethane and my Froggy Bottom guitar has a nitro finish.
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Steve Langham
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Steve Langham » Tue Jan 03, 2017 10:58 am

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Musicguy1515 wrote:Has anyone tried the Gitano Guitar support? I have heard this one is supposed to be good as well.


I have one on my lessons guitar and always recommend them to students who may benefit from a rest instead of a footstool. In the current version the suckers have lift tabs, avoiding the need to dig under to release them; and each packet has a square of stickyback plastic in case the instrument has a less-than glassy smooth finish, eg French polish.

I use an Arm'N'Track on my main guitars but they are not made anymore.


I use the Gitano and works very well and it isn't bulky like the other types and I like that when I'm done it folds up whilst still attached.

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Gorn
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Gorn » Wed Jan 04, 2017 9:19 am

I'm a lousy heretic and put the guitar on my - I almost don't dare to telll - right leg, like a steelstring guitar. I use the dynarette, which is in my opinion the most comfortable and easy-to-use helping device, I've ever experienced. Even when using a high footstool, I'll tend to bow my back, so that I nearly can't get up after an hour or two. The dynarette positions the upper bout closely below my right armpit. I don't hold the guitar parallel to my chest, but in an angle of 10-15 degrees in the direction of my left knee. My home chair is a cheap lightweight collapsible aluminium "bistro type" chair. It's height is 43 cm (backside) respectively 45 mm (knee).
When playing a gig, I usually find a chair, that is low enough, otherwise I'll take my bistro chair with me. I've also found a way to "micro-adjust" the height: just lean the heel of my right shoe to the chair's front leg and keep it there - it works.
Of course, the dynarette doesn't fit in a guitar case, so I put sheets and the dynarette together into one of those cheap flap-over plastic "college bags", which works very well.

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zupfgeiger
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby zupfgeiger » Wed Jan 04, 2017 11:05 am

A high footstool is bad for my back. For a long time I used a Dynarette cushion, but I felt more and more uncomfortable with it as the cushion is quite unstable. Now a talented German carpenter made a special guitar rest for me, tailored to my specifications. It's a small device that does not look like a clumsy prothese, very much in the style of the Kris Barnett guitar support, but without the disadvantage of the strong magnets. The wood is bocote. Very stable and with high quality suction cups which don't show any traces on the varnish of my Tacchi.
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Re: Which way of support do you prefer?

Postby Intune » Wed Jan 04, 2017 12:10 pm

Having used foot stools, Dynarette cushions, and various guitar supports for decades, owing to a bad back I finally switched to Paul Galbraith's upright cello posture in 2008, and there I stay. This has meant fitting a cello endpin to my guitar -- no big problem so long as you don't mind drilling a 1-inch diameter hole in your endgraft -- and lately I've begun using a special armrest, attached by suction cups, that I built myself for use in this posture. It's all worked for me and allows me to continue playing despite back issues that might otherwise have curtailed my music-making.
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