guitar support changes angles to hands

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Jeffrey Armbruster
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guitar support changes angles to hands

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Sun Jan 15, 2017 11:57 pm

I just got a Murata support. It seems to give my right hand a much better angle (straighter wrist) than when I use a foot support. The head of my guitar is still at eye level, but slightly higher. the headstock is further away from my eyes, and the upper positions closer; plus the neck is more perpendicular to the floor--a good thing I think. But all of this is throwing me off. I assume other people have experienced this and wonder if they have any comments--especially about how long it takes to get used to a slightly different (higher) neck angle. I think that these changes are all good; although I'll have a teacher review them on Tuesday.
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souldier
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Re: guitar support changes angles to hands

Post by souldier » Mon Jan 16, 2017 1:34 am

If something doesn't feel comfortable or natural, then something is probably wrong. I remember when I switched from a foot stool to a guitar support and immediately felt pure bliss with zero adjustment period. You might want to try adjusting your Murata if it is adjustable. If not try one that is like the De Oro support which I initially used. Now I use the Barnett and haven't looked back.
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Luis_Br
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Re: guitar support changes angles to hands

Post by Luis_Br » Mon Jan 16, 2017 12:11 pm

I don't agree with the approach of getting used to some support, chair, footstool or whatever. It must be the opposite. You first find the best position for the guitar holding it in the air, maybe someone else should help with this. Then you adjust an accessory, footstool or whatever to hold the guitar in that position, trying to achieve with good overal ergonomic for the whole body.
My previous teacher had an accessory, a kind of pedestral similar to Aguado's tripod, to hold the guitar completly without needing to hold it or touch it to your body. He puts the guitar high with this and ask the student to play with it standing up. Then he researchs a nice position for the guitar with this support while the student is playing standing up. With this approach both guitar and body are very free and easy to move around. After finding a good free posture/position, he works translating it into sitting with a regular accessory.
When I first changed to an accessory, from the footstool, I found one and an adjustment that could keep the exact same position of the guitar relative to body, hands etc., when compared to the footstool solution.

It doesn't mean position/posture should be treated as a fixed thing. You ceratinly may do small changes, we are always changing as we make progress. Maybe the change with the accessory showed you that your previous posture treatment was not so good and you should research more.

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: guitar support changes angles to hands

Post by Marko Räsänen » Mon Jan 16, 2017 2:32 pm

Footstool was ideal for me, as it allowed me to keep the guitar steady between the thighs and the chest. But I developed a lower back pain / stiffness, and had to get a guitar support (Tenuto Pro). I can't keep the guitar as stable as I used to, and have to resort slightly to my right arm keeping the guitar steady during left hand position shifts.

I remember when I first got the support that the guitar felt very alien to me, and I kept missing strings with my RH, and I definitely had an adjustment period of few days, maybe even weeks.
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Jeffrey Armbruster
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Re: guitar support changes angles to hands

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Mon Jan 16, 2017 5:17 pm

I think that my footstool is fine for my left hand, and it's comfortable. What has become apparent is that my right hand has a bad tendency to bend downward at the wrist when playing. It seems a lot more natural to keep a straight wrist with the Murata (using the 3 inch pole and a very low footstool). This has subtly shifted the body of the guitar to the left, it seems. Stupidly I never really analyzed how I was holding the guitar. Tomorrow I'll see a teacher who will help with all of this I hope.
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Re: guitar support changes angles to hands

Post by tormodg » Mon Jan 16, 2017 7:43 pm

My right hand bends at the wrist (not the Segovia way but in a straight line from the elbow), and it's the most natural and comfortable position for me. After getting a Barnett support and setting it up right, I find that the guitar rests more naturally and I spend less effort to sit correctly.
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Re: guitar support changes angles to hands

Post by keithwwk » Tue Jan 17, 2017 5:12 am

My murata still with me. I custom made few different length rob to experience the angle. But the longer the rob (the higher the headstock) the insecure I felt with the support. After I analysed why both my hands is freer and play much better when I sit lazily on sofa than I sit in formal classical posture, I back to the stock length of the murata. I had experienced what Luis_Br mentioned above find out the most comfortable posture then adjust the support to serve that posture.
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