First thing to learn as a guitarist

Ergonomics and Posture for Classical Guitarists, Aches and Pains, Injuries, etc...
Hyrtsi
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Re: First thing to learn as a guitarist

Post by Hyrtsi » Thu May 11, 2017 5:00 pm

For me it was apoyando and tirando.

One of the first homeworks I got was to find where the notes are on the fretboard. For absolute beginners, this of course requires learning the notes. So I agree with others saying that using sheet over tabs is very important.

How important do you think using p,i or i,m to play scales is?

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robin loops
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Re: First thing to learn as a guitarist

Post by robin loops » Fri May 12, 2017 7:58 pm

Jim Thompson wrote:
Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:15 am
Devon, assuming you are talking about beginning students, I'd recommend basic first position chords from early Mel Bay or similar. They're easy to learn, satisfying and can be a confidence builder. It may not be very 'classical', but all those chord patterns show up over and over in the etudes.
This! Plus I'd start them right away working with some basic notation exercises, primarily so their physical ability to play doesn't get too far aheaad of their ability to read notation. When that happens it becomes very difficult to back track and play more remedial things in order to develop those skills. But, I would also make sure not to push it too much as it can be quite intimidating at first as well as perhaps the more boring type of exercises.

Mostly I would focus on a balance between the mental and physical elements of learning as well as enjoyable versus hard work parts. A good balance is probably the most important factor to keep students from burning out. If it isn't fun they'll quit. If they don't advance technically they will quit, and any time a player hits a brick wall and has to back up (i.e. to learn something below their ability to play like reading notation after becoming a proficient player, among other things) there is the risk of burnout.
One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them, One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.
-James-

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saitenfreak
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Re: First thing to learn as a guitarist

Post by saitenfreak » Sat May 13, 2017 10:21 pm

MDevon wrote:
Sun Oct 06, 2013 12:27 am
Goose997 wrote:Learn to read notes - not tabs.
Much agreed
I got a different opinion. Supposed, each beginner is about to copy a role model, first thing is to create a first success in order to enthusiasmate.
I agree, that working on the left hand when fingering the notes is essential, but I don't care about scores, notes or tabs.
As a starter I hardly believe that interpretation is the issue. If one is familiar with tabs, I don't worry.
I prefer to work on the right hands feeling for rhythm and timing.
Less than buzzing notes or clear ones it's the timing, that brings a piece to live.
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Erik Zurcher
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Re: First thing to learn as a guitarist

Post by Erik Zurcher » Sat May 13, 2017 10:30 pm

First thing to learn as a guitarist is to listen carefully, it's ear training first.
Reedition Domingo Esteso by Conde Hermanos 2004; Kenny Hill, model Barcelona 2001
"While you try to master classical guitar, prepare for a slave's life: the guitar will forever be your master and you its slave".

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Rick Yzaguirre
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Re: First thing to learn as a guitarist

Post by Rick Yzaguirre » Sun May 14, 2017 9:47 am

Counting out loud ... I read somewhere that beginners should count everything out loud for at least the first year or two. I'm not a teacher but can you guys weigh in? All the other tips are great though.

By the way, tab was created imperfectly in order to keep copyright people away. Also, musicians didn't have to buy the actual sheet music and could wing the timing because they knew the tune. So no to tab in classical!

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Rick Yzaguirre
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Re: First thing to learn as a guitarist

Post by Rick Yzaguirre » Sun May 14, 2017 10:00 am

Julian Ward wrote:
Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:06 am
A very interesting thread. I have taught for 20 years now and much of my teaching has been peripatetic.

Whether you chose to learn rest stroke melodies and later adding open bass notes or whether you initially learn freestroke through your teacher - I have found this is not the most important factor.

The most important factor that I think truly sets off a classical guitarist is the left hand thumb. I have taught hundreds - maybe more - of beginners and those that really succeed have been able to correctly position the left hand thumb and almost glue it to the neck whilst playing early on in first position.

A lot is said about not looking at hands - yes we all look at our left hand as 'performers'.. But initially looking straight at the music encourages faster learning of the notes and in my experience, faster progress.
First of all, I'm smarter now I learned a new word:

Peripatetic: adjective 1. traveling from place to place, especially working or based in various places for relatively short periods.

Secondly, I'd like to know more about the left hand thumb please. I've read about it briefly but never understood why its so important or what to actually do with it. Heck, I want to really succeed and be able to correctly position the left hand thumb also.

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Tom Poore
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Re: First thing to learn as a guitarist

Post by Tom Poore » Sun May 14, 2017 11:41 am

There are many things to learn at the outset. But here’s a decent start:

• Pay attention to your teacher. (If paying attention to your teacher doesn’t make you better, find another teacher.)
• Practice regularly.
• Always practice with a specific goal. (“I want to get better” isn’t a specific goal.)
• Understand the value of careful and accurate repetition.
• Don’t react negatively to mistakes.
• Cultivate a respect for process.

Tom Poore
South Euclid, OH
USA

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