Ping Pong nails

Nail care, nail problems, and the use of nails in playing the classical guitar.
guit-box
Posts: 690
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 4:57 am

Re: Ping Pong nails

Postby guit-box » Sun Jan 22, 2017 5:27 am

That is expensive. I pay $15 once for a powder acrylic set and $10 for fill-ins. I can live with leaving them grow out and not cover my whole nail for a long time, but I'm not really getting my hands dirty or playing rasgueados much. So, fill ins are every 2 months. I'm paying less than $100 per year. $10 to $15 a week is at least $520 per year...that's a LOT of money. Might be worth it to invest in a $100 lamp on e - b a y and DIY.

So if you go to a salon every 2-3 weeks, are you having the backs filled in or do they remove the nail and apply a whole new gel nail? If removal, how do they remove it? Sanding, chemical removal?
It's all true, except for the stuff that's not.

dtoh
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:54 pm

Re: Ping Pong nails

Postby dtoh » Sun Jan 22, 2017 8:13 am

Expense is relative I guess. I suspect you can get comparable results with a DIY kit, but it probably doesn't look as good. For me, consistent natural tone and never having to think about my nails makes it seem like a no brainer and probably the best investment I've ever made.

When I have my nails done, the nailist removes the old gel with acetone and a bit of peeling with a special tool. Hard gel or acrylic has to be ground off with an electric grinder.

I have had hard gel/acryllic done before. They last forever, but for me my nails were totally rigid and I had no feel in the nails. Soft gel on the other hand feels completely natural.

I don't really understand the technical differences between hard gel, soft gel and acrylics... but for me the soft gel provides a very natural feel with reasonable durability (i.e. they never break or crack but I have to get them redone every 2 to 3 weeks.

guit-box
Posts: 690
Joined: Mon Dec 05, 2011 4:57 am

Re: Ping Pong nails

Postby guit-box » Mon Jan 23, 2017 6:34 am

It's interesting to hear about your first hand experience and comparisons. I've done the powder acrylic myself for years but now found a cheap salon that does a better job so I've been going the salon route. Having watched the instructional video I posted on gel, I think the application is actually more fool proof than the acrylic because the gel is self-leveling, but it's a bigger initial investment to get the LED/UV light. I may give it a try after my acrylics grow off. Since I just keep doing fill-ins, I never have to remove the acrylics with acetone or sanding or prying so my nail beds are strong and protected. The idea of using acetone and prying off the nails seems like a recipe for weakening the natural nail to me, but I would like to give the gel a try at some point. I don't understand why it's necessary for the nailist to remove the whole nail, can't they just fill them in like they do with acrylics?
It's all true, except for the stuff that's not.

dtoh
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jan 11, 2016 12:54 pm

Re: Ping Pong nails

Postby dtoh » Mon Jan 23, 2017 4:05 pm

I think there is less adhesion with gel so even if you do a fill in (which I've done occasionally) the gel eventually starts to peel off. I think there is some damage to the nail with any kind of treatment you do. Some people claim there is no damage whatsoever, but I don't think that's true and my nailist says there is some thinning and drying of the nail for some people. For me, I just do gel treatment on the top half of the nail (so the bottom half of the nail grows naturally for a couple of months.) I also use a nail conditioning cream. Between the two my RH nails seem pretty healthy (better than before I started doing gel treatments.)

I'd encourage everyone to give it a try. If you don't like it, the gel is easy to remove and you're only out 30 bucks. For me after years of nails cracking and breaking and screwing around with various glues and fixes, it was like a miracle.

I think acrylics/hard gel are not bad solutions either but IMHO you lose some feel on the strings and you maybe get a brighter less natural tone.

Also if expense is an issue, I do think the DIY kits do an OK job, but a good nailist does a better job of making the nails look natural (including buffing to a matte finish.) My nailist has also been pretty helpful in working with me to experiment with different gel thicknesses which have an impact on nail flexibility/rigidity and therefore tone.

davekear
Posts: 47
Joined: Fri Oct 21, 2016 1:12 am
Location: California

Re: Ping Pong nails

Postby davekear » Fri Feb 03, 2017 6:38 am

All nail treatments do not damage your nails if you know what you're doing. Keep the nail sealed at all times, and make sure to apply the nail to no more than 3/4 of the nail plate. The nail is always growing out, there will always be new nail.
There are better methods than others, and pretty much all gel or acrylic nails, especially if done by a manicurist, usually results in nails that have very poor response and tone. Do it yourself with better results for less than a buck. What you're striving for in artificial nails is diversity of tone. You want to be able to get a nice warm "dolce" as well as a crisp, bright "ponticello" all with the same finger. Diversity of tone is what you're after. Artificial nails done correctly sound as good as the best natural nails and are perfectly safe to use on a daily basis.


Return to “Use of nails in playing the classical guitar”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: CommonCrawl [Bot], dtoh and 6 guests