Spanish - cocho is car in English

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glassynails
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Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by glassynails » Fri May 12, 2017 12:09 pm

I discovered that the word cocho in Spanish is car in English. Now I wonder if the English word 'coach' comes from the latin 'cocho'. I also read that the word 'car' comes from the latin 'carrus' which means a 'wheeled vehicle'. Then I noticed that 'carrus' looks like our English word 'carry'. Are all these works related?

Also interesting is the Spanish name for boat is 'barco' which sounds similar to 'barcarola' that some of in cg are familiar with.
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Vito Simplicio » Fri May 12, 2017 1:14 pm

Barcarola:

1. A Venetian gondolier's song with a rhythm suggestive of rowing.
2. A composition imitating a Venetian gondolier's song.


Origin and Etymology of car

Middle English carre, from Anglo-French, from Latin carra, plural of carrum, alteration of carrus, of Celt origin; akin to Old Irish & Middle Welsh carr vehicle; akin to Latin currere to run


First Known Use: 14th century

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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by simonm » Fri May 12, 2017 1:31 pm

glassynails wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 12:09 pm
….the word cocho in Spanish is car in English. ...
Not quite.

Depending on which source you look up "cocho" means a flour based south american drink, a pig, and old person.

I guess it is the spell checker at work. "coche" is a car. :-)

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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri May 12, 2017 1:34 pm

The English word 'coach' is from Hungarian, as is the Spanish 'coche' (Grijalbo). I would guess that the Spanish followed the English.
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by ddray » Fri May 12, 2017 1:41 pm

In Latin America it's usually "carro".

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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Catire » Fri May 12, 2017 2:47 pm

Coche is the word.
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Guero » Fri May 12, 2017 3:12 pm

sp. "coche", engl. "coach", ger. "Kutsche" come from hungarian "kocsi", which means "(wagon) from Kocs"

sp. "carro", engl. "car", ger. "Karre" come from latin "carrus" -> "currere" (to run)

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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Isabelle Frizac » Fri May 12, 2017 3:19 pm

In french "coche" mean "car" ( voiture in french) .
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri May 12, 2017 3:35 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 1:34 pm
I would guess that the Spanish followed the English.
I'm not so sure any more. At first sight you might think a British presence in Hungary predates a Spanish presence, but then you have to think of how many Spanish kings (might only have been Carlos I = Charles V: I don't know) were Holy Roman Emperor of what was later to become Austria Hungary.
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Justfun » Fri May 12, 2017 3:37 pm

South America Peru, Cocho-slangspanish = old person.
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Andrew Fryer » Fri May 12, 2017 3:42 pm

And carry basically comes from carricare, which is Latin for to cart (obviously from carrus = cart/carriage)
And vehicle is from Latin vehere, to carry. and it gives us the word wagon.
The words vehere, bear, ferry, fuehren perhaps, are all linked, afaicr. As is Latin ferre.
Barca is late Latin, and is possibly from the Greek word baris which is a flat-bottomed boat/barge type thing usually for carrying heavy loads on flat water. As someone said, a barcarole is a boat song.
You can get all this from a good English dictionary such as Chambers (there's a second hand paperback one on amazon dot com for 2 dollars, glassy, hint hint!). I have Greek and Latin lexica, but they are too cumbersome for me to want to look more fully into these words. e.g. the difference between ferre and vehere. Fero is from greek phero, carry/bear. Lewis and Short are coy about vehere. If it's linked to greek ochos, carriage, then that must have lost its waw (digamma). Haven't got the enery to take LSJ down from the shelf.

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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Fri May 12, 2017 10:02 pm

Andrew Fryer wrote:
Fri May 12, 2017 3:42 pm
No-one make the mistake of thinking Sanskrit will help you in understanding Greek or Latin! It is related, but it will help about as much as Greek will help with Dutch.
Indeed, Sanskrit is a sister language, sharing ancestry with Latin etc in the form of Proto-Indo European (PIE!). But the current numerals from 1-10 in Hindi are easily relateable to their European equivalents.
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Sat May 13, 2017 5:56 am

When I was very small we would refer to a coach using the French char-à-banc (pronounced sharrabang). As I recall, it was a specifically Yorkshire phenomenon; when I lived in various other parts of the country - Manchester and then Oxford - nobody ever recognised the term, and now that I'm back in Yorkshire it seems to have dropped out of use here too.

I still hold the term in some affection - "sharrabang" trips to the sea-side were an exciting adventure as a kid - the journey being as much fun for me as the destination. On-board crates of "pop" and packets of crisps with little blue bags of salt, lavatory stops at rickety country garages and the faint, ironically icy glimmer of something we used to know as "the sun."

I have absolutely no idea where we went but the vehicles I can picture down to the hub-caps and tail-lights.

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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Andrew Fryer » Sat May 13, 2017 10:18 am

There's an English author who describes the village's annual charabanc ride. We had to read it as shoolkids. I'm assuming it's Laurie Lee, but let me Google it. Yes, it's from Cider with Rosie.
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Andrew Fryer
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Re: Spanish - cocho is car in English

Post by Andrew Fryer » Sat May 13, 2017 10:45 am

Just reminded myself that two Anglo-Saxon words for horse are eoh and wicg. Eoh related to greek ochos; wicg related to Latin veho!
But Greek ochos also gives Latin equus and this is related to Greek hippos (google p-celtic and q-celtic for p-q morphology) and I think Epona was the Celtic goddess of horses (Epeius devised the Trojan Horse).

German for horse if pferd, which I suppose is from fero ultimately?
It's interesting how much German is directly from Latin. The most well-known are Strasse, from via "strata", and Bier from bibere!

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