Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

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kirolak
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Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by kirolak » Fri Sep 01, 2017 6:22 am

I've played this lovely little piece for many years, but have just had a look at the score again & had a serious water on the brain moment - in the last 3 bars there is a sharpened g, which is not "naturalised" in the score for the next notes, but which now sounds very strange if played as a # if it's held over (especially with the c,g,e chord) (I wish I had a music score programme!)

I have heard people play the g's as naturals after the first #, & my first teacher did not correct me when I did the same. :chaud:
Obviously the last bar contains the chord of b,g natural, d.

I am confused as to why I didn't notice this little g# anomaly before. . . I'd really appreciate a definitive answer, please - it's such a basic requirement to carry on playing g# for the whole bar that I am quite taken aback at the way I & many others in recordings have ignored the rule :oops: Hope I am making my query clear. . .

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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Fri Sep 01, 2017 5:42 pm

I have two versions and they both show f# but g natural. One of my versions is a print out from an early edition with Brouwer's notes. there's what looks like two sharps, one smudgy, on that penultimate bar. So you could think that the two sharps are for the f and g? If you have the same edition.
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Feynman
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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by Feynman » Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:42 am

If you have the Eschig version, I can understand thinking at a glance that the Gs are sharp, but notice that the markers are in the F space.

There are no G Sharps in the piece.
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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Sat Sep 02, 2017 9:27 am

As Feynman has pointed out - all the Gs are natural - however - bar 9 contains a classic Eschig misprint - the G is marked sharp (though the fingering indications make it clear that it should be played "open").

If you have played that earlier passage incorrectly (due to the misprint) your ear may have become accustomed to the sound thus leading you to compound the error in the penultimate measure. Understandable for someone learning to fall into that trap. Be aware that it may take a little while for the piece to sound correct to you after making the correction(s).

There is no excuse for your first teacher not picking this up - at least "first" implies that you now have a second and hopefully better one.

They are accidentals by the way - not "incidentals".

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RobMacKillop
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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by RobMacKillop » Sat Sep 02, 2017 10:31 am

You are, of course, correct, Mark. But I've long regarded them as incidentals. They are not, of course, accidents - unless you are a typsetter for Eschig!

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Mark Clifton-Gaultier
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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by Mark Clifton-Gaultier » Sat Sep 02, 2017 11:06 am

RobMacKillop wrote:They are not, of course, accidents - unless you are a typsetter for Eschig!
Do they have typesetters at Eschig?

Seriously - the word "accident" has a different meaning today. Archaically it simply meant an occurrence, something (not necessarily a mishap) that happens "along the way". So a lawn might have an accidental flower - not due to a mistake but simply because a single daisy happened to pop up by chance. Ironically something one might also describe as an "incident".

kirolak
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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by kirolak » Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:35 pm

Thank you so much everyone, I do have the Eschig edition so my problem has been solved; I have actually never played the g as sharpened, but looking at the score with new eyes, I picked up the anomaly & in a brain wave moment (ie water on brain) had quite a nasty turn, thinking I should have played a g# all along.

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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by Jeffrey Armbruster » Sat Sep 02, 2017 5:09 pm

After reading kirolak's post, I got out the music, saw the # looking smudge and said to myself 'I've been playing it wrong too!'. Then I proceeded to play the last chords with g#. Hmmm, I thought, that's odd but it's Brouwer, so...

Then I looked more carefully.
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kirolak
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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by kirolak » Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:20 pm

I feel better when someone of such stature also admits to being confused by it! :)

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Incidentals in Brouwer's Coral II Etude

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Sun Sep 03, 2017 1:34 pm

kirolak wrote:
Sat Sep 02, 2017 4:35 pm
Thank you so much everyone, I do have the Eschig edition so my problem has been solved; I have actually never played the g as sharpened, but looking at the score with new eyes, I picked up the anomaly & in a brain wave moment (ie water on brain) had quite a nasty turn, thinking I should have played a g# all along.
For anyone not quite aware of this, the jokes at the expense of Max Eschig editions are because they have a truly terrible reputation for making, (and leaving in for decades), many mistakes in their editions - and then charging a small fortune to buy them. Somehow or other they seem to have been able to contract many important composers, so we are kind of stuck with them.

And the OP can rest assured that the problem is very common and pretty much everyone who first comes across that form of notation gets stuck on it and misreads it. All part of the fun of how we write things for the instrument.
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