Your musical language

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
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rojarosguitar
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Your musical language

Post by rojarosguitar » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:02 am

When I listen to chamber music ensembles that are (or have been) playing together for a long time, they often not only have developed a great sensitivity and responsiveness to each others' musical impulses, but more than that something I could call a 'musical language', meaning that they bring more to their music making than 'just reading the score' - something that is hard to grasp or describe but nevertheless is there.

What is your view?
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...
My Youtube Channel is: TheMusicalEvents

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Steve Ganz
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Re: Your musical language

Post by Steve Ganz » Mon Feb 05, 2018 6:34 am

Do you play in ensemble or just solo?

Playing regularly with others definitely changes how we talk about the music. I've been playing in the same trio for about a decade now and things develop and evolve individually and as a group.

When the music is happening, it is more than the sum of its parts.
Steve

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Your musical language

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:36 am

I'd think of that the repertoire determines the musical language; the charateristics of the ensemble make up gives it a tone of voice or 'accent'.
Simon Ambridge Series 40 (2005)
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rojarosguitar
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Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 12:24 pm
Location: near Freiburg, Germany

Re: Your musical language

Post by rojarosguitar » Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:44 am

Yes, I play within the same formation for at least 16 years - with changing fringe but the same duo partner. I observe these phenomena within our formation, too, though we don't play classical music.
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...
My Youtube Channel is: TheMusicalEvents

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rojarosguitar
Posts: 4600
Joined: Sat Sep 19, 2009 12:24 pm
Location: near Freiburg, Germany

Re: Your musical language

Post by rojarosguitar » Sun Feb 11, 2018 9:52 am

Stephen Kenyon wrote:
Mon Feb 05, 2018 7:36 am
I'd think of that the repertoire determines the musical language; the characteristics of the ensemble make up gives it a tone of voice or 'accent'.
Well, that's maybe a bit rough approach. You could say, Swiss German is an 'accent' or dialect of the German language, but in a way it's a language of its' own.
I think an ensemble that plays long enough develops a kind of a language that may be quite distinct from the generic language of that genre.
For me the Yuval Piano Trio comes to mind. Their interpretation of Schubert, Dvorzak or Smetana have such a distinct quality that for me it's a form of their language. Well, it's words anyway ...
Music is a big continent with different landscapes and corners. Some of them I do visit frequently, some from time to time and some I know from hearsay only ...
My Youtube Channel is: TheMusicalEvents

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