Guitar size/ human body length

Discussions relating to the classical guitar which don't fit elsewhere.
Improvisator
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Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Improvisator » Thu Apr 04, 2019 2:24 pm

Who plays bariton guitar, because he/she is a tall person?

Who plays a 7/8 size because of sound?

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Sebastian
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Sebastian » Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:00 pm

Improvisator wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 2:24 pm
Who plays bariton guitar, because he/she is a tall person?

Who plays a 7/8 size because of sound?
I bought a Taylor GS Mini E back in 2017, which is a 7/8 acoustic guitar model. I chose it because I like playing fingerstyle and it suits for some of its repertoire, and also because of the size. I'm kind of short, 1.65 m., and my hands/fingers are not small either, but they are kind of below the average. Not that it is a very decisive disvantage, but as I was looking for an acoustic guitar i found this model, which by reviews and my own experience is good, and also happened to be smaller. Thus, the choice.
Although now I'm intending to sell it to buy a better classical guitar.
Only disvantage of the Taylor GS Mini is that the strings are more tensioned, I don't know if the fact that it is smaller adds more tension. I will actually post that question now that I think of it. Also, the strings are tighter which can be sometimes a disvantage for fingerstyle.
But overall, 7/8 acoustic guitar was good for me. And now that I think of it I will miss having it once I sell it.
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Improvisator
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Improvisator » Fri Apr 05, 2019 8:52 am

Sebastian wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:00 pm
Improvisator wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 2:24 pm
Only disvantage of the Taylor GS Mini is that the strings are more tensioned, I don't know if the fact that it is smaller adds more tension. I will actually post that question now that I think of it.
To let a small string swing, it takes less tension.
A one inch string has to be very loose to swing. A small turn will get a high E.

Thnx for your Taylor story.

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Sebastian
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Sebastian » Fri Apr 05, 2019 3:35 pm

Improvisator wrote:
Fri Apr 05, 2019 8:52 am
Sebastian wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:00 pm
Improvisator wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 2:24 pm
Only disvantage of the Taylor GS Mini is that the strings are more tensioned, I don't know if the fact that it is smaller adds more tension. I will actually post that question now that I think of it.
To let a small string swing, it takes less tension.
A one inch string has to be very loose to swing. A small turn will get a high E.

Thnx for your Taylor story.
Yes, I've read that. Thing is that Taylor gs Mini use as default 0.13 strings which are heavier than the average 0.11 (on regular-sized guitars for fingerstyle), I don't know which would have more tension a normal acoustic guitar with 0.11 or a 7/8 one with 0.13.
You're reading this.

Improvisator
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Improvisator » Fri Apr 05, 2019 7:43 pm

Sebastian wrote:
Fri Apr 05, 2019 3:35 pm
Improvisator wrote:
Fri Apr 05, 2019 8:52 am
Sebastian wrote:
Thu Apr 04, 2019 10:00 pm
Only disvantage of the Taylor GS Mini is that the strings are more tensioned, I don't know if the fact that it is smaller adds more tension. I will actually post that question now that I think of it.
To let a small string swing, it takes less tension.
A one inch string has to be very loose to swing. A small turn will get a high E.

Thnx for your Taylor story.
Yes, I've read that. Thing is that Taylor gs Mini use as default 0.13 strings which are heavier than the average 0.11 (on regular-sized guitars for fingerstyle), I don't know which would have more tension a normal acoustic guitar with 0.11 or a 7/8 one with 0.13.
They do probably for compensating. 0.13 has more tension and less when smaller.

Improvisator
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Improvisator » Thu Apr 11, 2019 1:13 pm

My point is: Arnold Schwarzenegger might play picolo flute or triangle, but small persons do not prefere sousaphone.
Because of weight.
Not because of voice size.

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Peter Frary
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Peter Frary » Thu Apr 11, 2019 6:09 pm

I play a Romero Creations 432mm (requinto pitch) and 510mm (Terz) scale guitars for the timbre of the higher register. Love the tone and response but my normal guitar is 664 (Ramirez). Variety is nice. I'm only 5'8" but the choice of instrument sizes are purely musical. It was a real struggle to adjust to the 432mm (feels good now).
I play a Tiny Tenor 6 so I look taller on stage!

Carlos
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Carlos » Thu Apr 11, 2019 8:38 pm

to me it is pretty obvious that the guitar will evolve and adjust together with the evolution of mankind and body size. The instrument should be adjusted to the player, not the contrary.

It seems to me that the new generation is quite taller than mine (I am in my fourties) and in many case I find the guitar is undersized for these younger players. I guess in 30 years or so this is gonna show up in (an increase in) the average scale and size of guitars.

Torres has built many small body guitars that you would never build anymore today because population is on average taller than it was at that time.

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Michael.N.
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Michael.N. » Thu Apr 11, 2019 9:59 pm

Excuse me! Some players like the small Torres guitars. In actual fact the very smallest that he made sounds close to a romantic guitar. Of course its very much a minority but as Peter states, it's the variety. Besides the scale length is nowhere near as short as a Terz let alone a requinto.
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hesson11
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by hesson11 » Thu Apr 11, 2019 11:29 pm

Carlos wrote:
Thu Apr 11, 2019 8:38 pm
Torres has built many small body guitars that you would never build anymore today because population is on average taller than it was at that time.
I can't quite agree with this. I'm 6'1" and I much prefer my Torres-sized guitar to standard-sized guitars, and it was, in fact, made just a couple of years ago (by Kenny Hill). There are plenty of smaller guitars being built today.
-Bob

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Peter Frary
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Peter Frary » Fri Apr 12, 2019 7:33 am

Ah dunno about all of mankind becoming taller. I'm only 5'8" and yet feel really tall on Oahu. Most of my college age students are shorter than me but, amazingly, I see men and women measuring in at at 5 feet and less playing full sized classical and dreadnought guitars in my classes all the time. And then there's always that 6+ footer in my ukulele class with a soprano ukulele...
I play a Tiny Tenor 6 so I look taller on stage!

Carlos
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Carlos » Fri Apr 12, 2019 12:12 pm

I easily give you that people still have an interest in building Torres copies or Romantic guitars nowadays - forgive my rhetoric use of the word never. My point was about the evolution of the standard size, in relation to the average size of the players.

Standards are not cast in stone and you should expect them to keep changing, looking forward.

Some changes are driven by attempts to improve on the sound (say: lattice bracing to improve volume), some others are driven by attempts to optimize the matching between the player´s body and the instrument (say: the armrest). Some changes will succesfully spread and become standards (the 650 scale), some will be dropped (tornavoz).

For sure, we are all tall compared to a Ukele, yet a Ukulele has to be played with a different technique than the one you use for a classical guitar because the instrument has different dimensions, also in relation to the human body (replace Ukulele by Guitalele if you find this compares better with a guitar).

As to the trend increase in average mankind size, it is quite well documented (for instance here ). However, this is only indeed an average, and differences occur accross people and regions in the world.

I am just betting that overall the average standard guitar size will likely change in response to this average trend increase. But I wouldn´t see this as the most significant change to expect, looking forward. There are so many other things going on.

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Peter Frary
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Peter Frary » Sat Apr 13, 2019 5:16 pm

If anything, I see an increasing trend towards production of small body acoustic guitars: parlor guitars, guitarlele, 19th century reproductions and redesigns, 0, travel guitars, etc. If you go back a few decades it was difficult to find smaller acoustic guitars of any flavor...
I play a Tiny Tenor 6 so I look taller on stage!

dcuttler
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by dcuttler » Mon Apr 15, 2019 6:52 pm

I second the Romero Creations reduced scale guitars.

I moved from 650mm to 580mm, and finally to a Romero Creations DHO 6 String guitar with a 530mm scale. It's magic!

If you struggle with joint pain, arthritis, or just find it difficult to stretch your fingers enough to make some of the fingerings using a 650mm scale, you should seriously consider a short scale guitar. I'm not talking about the folks that obsess over the difference between 650mm and 630mm, which wouldn't have come close to addressing my problems, go really short and look into guitars with scales between 500mm and 600mm.

A smaller guitar may not have the quite the volume or projection of a “full size” guitar, but the fun factor, and ease of playing a reduced scale guitar, can more than make up for it.

The one negative you often run into with reduced scale guitars is a reduction in the width of the fretboard so they can be sold to children. The DHO 6 String is 48mm at the nut, which while adequate would have been even better if it were at least 52mm to accommodate fatter fingers.

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Peter Frary
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Re: Guitar size/ human body length

Post by Peter Frary » Mon Apr 15, 2019 9:10 pm

I believe the Kanile'a GL6 has a 52mm nut with 510mm scale. It's a bit pricey—starts at about $1500—but is well made (Oahu) and can be made to order with your choice of woods, binding, rosette, etc. My wife has one and the extra few mm do make a significant different in the first position over a 49mm nut on the Romero Creations. Doesn't seem to matter much by the 4th or 5th position. The upper fret access is almost silly good (neck joins at 16th fret).
I play a Tiny Tenor 6 so I look taller on stage!

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