Getting (back) into composing for CG

Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.
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Composers' Workshop
Theory and practice of composition and arranging for classical guitar, discussion of works in progress, etc.

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Andy Culpepper
Luthier
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Location: Ithaca, NY USA

Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Andy Culpepper » Wed May 31, 2017 8:13 pm

Hi all,
I haven't really composed much for classical guitar in 10-12 years, but sometimes have a little flurry of creativity in that space. I'm going to use this thread to upload my compositions and all comments are welcome. This one I wrote over the last few days. I have a bad habit of recording before I get everything perfectly under my fingers but here it is:

https://soundcloud.com/user-1512343/vals

I've finished writing another short piece now and hopefully will have it recorded and uploaded in a couple of days.

Bonus questions, since I am a luthier: can anyone guess what woods the guitar is made of?

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Andy Culpepper
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Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 4:57 pm
Location: Ithaca, NY USA

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Andy Culpepper » Thu Jun 01, 2017 11:05 pm

Another short one. You can probably hear the Bach influence.
Very concise but I think it says what it needs to say.

https://soundcloud.com/user-1512343/june

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Stephen Kenyon
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Location: Dorchester, Dorset, England

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Thu Jun 01, 2017 11:38 pm

Sounds like you've got lots of ideas bubbling all over there Andy! Sorry not going to guess the woods but please keep it up ...
Simon Ambridge Series 40 (2005)
Trevor Semple Series 88 (1992)
Louis Panormo (1838)
Alexander Batov Baroque Guitar (2013)

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Andy Culpepper
Luthier
Posts: 199
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 4:57 pm
Location: Ithaca, NY USA

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Andy Culpepper » Sun Jun 04, 2017 10:55 pm

Thanks Stephen! I'll see what else I have in me.

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Tony Hyman
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Location: Philipstown South Africa

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Tony Hyman » Sun Jun 18, 2017 2:25 pm

Enjoy yourself Andy

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dropbydrop
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Location: Italy

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by dropbydrop » Thu Jul 27, 2017 8:52 am

Definitely good ideas ... it's a good listening! Thanks for sharing them.
first comes right, than comes fast!

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Andy Culpepper
Luthier
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Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 4:57 pm
Location: Ithaca, NY USA

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Andy Culpepper » Wed Aug 02, 2017 12:46 am

Thanks Non Tabius and dropbydrop.

I wrote another one, so far I like this one best:
https://soundcloud.com/user-1512343/nocturne

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David Gutowski
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Location: Arizona

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by David Gutowski » Sat Dec 16, 2017 7:36 am

Sounds really good, thanks...this is most likely an elementary question, but what key is it in or do you skip around to other keys...I guess what I'm asking is do you have to stay in one key when you're playing or writing a song...I don't have a teacher...I've made up some songs from one key. I play the cords and scale notes from that key and have made up my own cords by just combining the scale notes I'm using when I'm playing in the chosen key... To me it sounds okay and I've found it helps learning to play the cg but I was wondering if I can skip around to different keys while playing the same song.
Thanks,
David V. :casque:
3 hard things for humans: dentist visit, public speaking, offering forgiveness.

Muse: chg pitch measure rhym feel tempo improvise melody harmonize arpeggios stucco your legato & practice

Carrillo Concert
Yulong Chamber '17
Bozo 123

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Stephen Kenyon
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Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Sat Dec 16, 2017 11:12 am

David Gutowski wrote:
Sat Dec 16, 2017 7:36 am
Sounds really good, thanks...this is most likely an elementary question, but what key is it in or do you skip around to other keys...I guess what I'm asking is do you have to stay in one key when you're playing or writing a song...I don't have a teacher...I've made up some songs from one key. I play the cords and scale notes from that key and have made up my own cords by just combining the scale notes I'm using when I'm playing in the chosen key... To me it sounds okay and I've found it helps learning to play the cg but I was wondering if I can skip around to different keys while playing the same song.
Thanks,
David V. :casque:
The simple answer is "write what you like". If your inspiration involves riffing on one key or even one chord, that's it.
Most pieces (songs have words, instrumental pieces are not rightly called 'songs', cos it confuses simple souls like me) if they are a bit longer than short will have at least some key change, for the sake of variety, and to help the piece work over the longer time span. If you play entirely by ear then try working out at least the basic chords of some medium length pieces and you will find that occasionally they move to different key centres at least for a while; some times they just stop in one key and re-start in another, sometimes they morph from one into another (its called modulation).
Most conventional pieces will begin and end in the same key, but its not a law.
If you are actually writing a song, e.g. setting words, then the same thing applies except the style of most songwriting involves staying in the same key most of the time, the length of the song is supported more often by the lyrics and the verse-chorus structure. But even then, a middle 8 is often a bit of a key change too.
Simon Ambridge Series 40 (2005)
Trevor Semple Series 88 (1992)
Louis Panormo (1838)
Alexander Batov Baroque Guitar (2013)

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David Gutowski
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Location: Arizona

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by David Gutowski » Mon Dec 18, 2017 5:28 am

Hi Stephen...thanks for getting back to me and your informative explanation. I was probably thinking cg pieces (when I mentioned songs, I was referring to instrumental pieces as songs-thanks for the clarification, I don't write any words) could be written simplistically, or maybe just hoping they could be. Like learn the scale notes and cords in one key and mix it up you would have a piece. And I guess you would have a simple piece but, answering my own question-it would be simple. I see you mentioned conventional pieces generally begin and end in the same key...I would be happy with that and later explore modulation and key shifting. I just wonder how it would sound. Would the listener think I'm playing another song within the original song when I'm doing modulation or key shifting...but I understand different keys use the same "cowboy" cords... I can live with making up songs in the same key and the cords...I'm low intermediate player and it might get too complicated to learn and shift to other keys while composing pieces.
Thanks for the clarification. I'm going to do a little research on instrm piece composing and modulation...I love this forum.
David
3 hard things for humans: dentist visit, public speaking, offering forgiveness.

Muse: chg pitch measure rhym feel tempo improvise melody harmonize arpeggios stucco your legato & practice

Carrillo Concert
Yulong Chamber '17
Bozo 123

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Stephen Kenyon
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Location: Dorchester, Dorset, England

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by Stephen Kenyon » Mon Dec 18, 2017 4:45 pm

David Gutowski wrote:
Mon Dec 18, 2017 5:28 am
..... Would the listener think I'm playing another song within the original song when I'm doing modulation or key shifting...but I understand different keys use the same "cowboy" cords.......
Well that's part of the game, making a new section sound different yet like it belongs. If you listen to any extended piece you will notice radically different music in different sections - try Lagrima for a start, sweet major key to begin and end, slightly angsty minor key in the middle (with a minor quote from the very beginning of the piece). Apart from that quote the two sections could be different pieces. Then try something properly extended like Albeniz's Asturias, and the two different parts really are almost worlds apart, thought in fact are simply contrasting ideas that keep the piece going over its whole duration.
Simon Ambridge Series 40 (2005)
Trevor Semple Series 88 (1992)
Louis Panormo (1838)
Alexander Batov Baroque Guitar (2013)

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David Gutowski
Posts: 489
Joined: Fri Apr 22, 2016 4:14 am
Location: Arizona

Re: Getting (back) into composing for CG

Post by David Gutowski » Tue Dec 19, 2017 7:05 am

I'm starting to get it...my very favorite piece I play is Lagrima and I'm beginning to understand what you're saying. I should get a teacher...but there just is no cg teachers in my area and I refuse to move to a populated area.
Thanks so much for the instruction and your suggestion on blocking out the blue light from computer screens. I ordered a pair of blue light blocking glasses just before logging on...my wife has been telling me about the blue light but I was not taking her seriously...I got a pair of light blocking glasses-wearing then now-out of my motor home and they are working but I think there for driving and the blue light ones are for computers so I'll just have to wait a few days.
Thanks again Stephen and look forward to talking to you on the forum.
Hope you have I good holiday...best wishes,
David
3 hard things for humans: dentist visit, public speaking, offering forgiveness.

Muse: chg pitch measure rhym feel tempo improvise melody harmonize arpeggios stucco your legato & practice

Carrillo Concert
Yulong Chamber '17
Bozo 123

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