Takamine C132S plug

Tom Wimsatt
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:44 pm

eno wrote:
Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:49 pm
Another Takamine lover here. I played C128 for many years and loved it. Then upgraded to quite a few other guitars including 1976 C136S (bought it for $650, that was a bargain). Although Bernabe is my primary guitar I would still rate the C136S to be the second after Bernabe. It has beautiful and strong sound, excellent playability and workmanship, beautiful BRW patterns (see here). I also refinished it with shellac and it noticeably improved the sound.
Hello eno. I've wondered how these models (128, 132, 136) differ. I'm impressed with your decision to refinish your 136. Was this done to the soundboard only? I've thought about doing this also. What type of finish was originally on it? Did you strip it off?
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

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eno
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by eno » Tue Dec 19, 2017 2:42 am

Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:44 pm
eno wrote:
Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:49 pm
Another Takamine lover here. I played C128 for many years and loved it. Then upgraded to quite a few other guitars including 1976 C136S (bought it for $650, that was a bargain). Although Bernabe is my primary guitar I would still rate the C136S to be the second after Bernabe. It has beautiful and strong sound, excellent playability and workmanship, beautiful BRW patterns (see here). I also refinished it with shellac and it noticeably improved the sound.
Hello eno. I've wondered how these models (128, 132, 136) differ. I'm impressed with your decision to refinish your 136. Was this done to the soundboard only? I've thought about doing this also. What type of finish was originally on it? Did you strip it off?
I don't think C128 model even existed in 70s, mine 128 was from 2001. C128 is different from 132-150, it sounds quite different, 128 is spruce, 132-150 are all cedar, etc. Here is the info that I found on the net about the Takamine guitars and the differences within 132-150 family, I'm not sure that all it says it true, it's just what I found. This text says that C136S is a copy of Ramirez 1A but it's not exactly true, C136S has Kohno-style parallel bracing (as opposed to fan-style Ramirez bracing).

I only refinished the soundboard and yes, I stripped the old nitro polish. French polishing was fun (as long as you have some skills to do that) but stripping the nitro was NOT fun. If you ever decide to do that make sure you do it outside and wear a good face mask, it's toxic.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Takamine C136S 1976
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967

Tom Wimsatt
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:27 pm

eno wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 2:42 am
Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Mon Dec 18, 2017 11:44 pm
eno wrote:
Mon Dec 18, 2017 3:49 pm
Another Takamine lover here. I played C128 for many years and loved it. Then upgraded to quite a few other guitars including 1976 C136S (bought it for $650, that was a bargain). Although Bernabe is my primary guitar I would still rate the C136S to be the second after Bernabe. It has beautiful and strong sound, excellent playability and workmanship, beautiful BRW patterns (see here). I also refinished it with shellac and it noticeably improved the sound.
Hello eno. I've wondered how these models (128, 132, 136) differ. I'm impressed with your decision to refinish your 136. Was this done to the soundboard only? I've thought about doing this also. What type of finish was originally on it? Did you strip it off?
I don't think C128 model even existed in 70s, mine 128 was from 2001. C128 is different from 132-150, it sounds quite different, 128 is spruce, 132-150 are all cedar, etc. Here is the info that I found on the net about the Takamine guitars and the differences within 132-150 family, I'm not sure that all it says it true, it's just what I found. This text says that C136S is a copy of Ramirez 1A but it's not exactly true, C136S has Kohno-style parallel bracing (as opposed to fan-style Ramirez bracing).

I only refinished the soundboard and yes, I stripped the old nitro polish. French polishing was fun (as long as you have some skills to do that) but stripping the nitro was NOT fun. If you ever decide to do that make sure you do it outside and wear a good face mask, it's toxic.
Thanks eno for the response. I've worked with shellac before (furniture building). I may try this sometime.
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

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eno
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by eno » Tue Dec 19, 2017 7:25 pm

Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:27 pm
Thanks eno for the response. I've worked with shellac before (furniture building). I may try this sometime.
Bob O'Brien at O'Brien Guitars has excellent online course on the guitar French polish technique
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Takamine C136S 1976
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967

Tom Wimsatt
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Posts: 222
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Tue Dec 19, 2017 9:59 pm

eno wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 7:25 pm
Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 5:27 pm
Thanks eno for the response. I've worked with shellac before (furniture building). I may try this sometime.
Bob O'Brien at O'Brien Guitars has excellent online course on the guitar French polish technique
Thanks for the recommendation. I'll give that a try for sure.
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

davebones
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by davebones » Tue Dec 19, 2017 10:07 pm

My Takamine C132 is a 1977 version with bone nut and saddle. I got it with the idea of buying a "better"guitar once I became more competent in playing classical guitar. With Savarez Corum Alliance strings on it, it sounds very good to me and in no way inferior to the guitars at the local retail shop. There are some great clips of youtube of the C132 in the hand of a masterful player.

Tom Wimsatt
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Tue Dec 19, 2017 11:42 pm

davebones wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 10:07 pm
My Takamine C132 is a 1977 version with bone nut and saddle. I got it with the idea of buying a "better"guitar once I became more competent in playing classical guitar. With Savarez Corum Alliance strings on it, it sounds very good to me and in no way inferior to the guitars at the local retail shop. There are some great clips of youtube of the C132 in the hand of a masterful player.
You are absolutely right on that. I am quite happy with my c132. Were it not for internet exposure I probably would not be tempted to look for something better.

I do like to tweak things, and my guitar has a couple of deep scratches on it which I could conveniently fix while trying out the French polish refinish. :)
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

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eno
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by eno » Wed Dec 20, 2017 3:04 am

Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Tue Dec 19, 2017 11:42 pm
I do like to tweak things, and my guitar has a couple of deep scratches on it which I could conveniently fix while trying out the French polish refinish. :)
There are a few threads in this forum on refinishing. If you keep the bridge then the trickiest thing is to polish around the bridge, it's hard to do it clean. Most luthiers recommend removing the bridge for the cleanest refinish (I had to do it anyway to adjust the action by thinning the bridge). Michael Thames has a video on YT on guitar FP top finishing including handling the bridge area and gluing the bridge.
Paulino Bernabe 'India' 2001
Takamine C136S 1976
Masaru Kohno No.6 1967

davebones
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by davebones » Wed Dec 20, 2017 10:33 pm

Tom
Let us know if you go through with a refinish of the c132s top. I looked at the bay of E today and saw that there are quite a few decent 132s guitars available for not very much cash, so if you trash yours you could get another one. I think there is a youtube vid of a forum member who french polished his C136s and it worked out.

Tom Wimsatt
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Fri Dec 22, 2017 3:02 am

davebones wrote:
Wed Dec 20, 2017 10:33 pm
Tom
Let us know if you go through with a refinish of the c132s top. I looked at the bay of E today and saw that there are quite a few decent 132s guitars available for not very much cash, so if you trash yours you could get another one. I think there is a youtube vid of a forum member who french polished his C136s and it worked out.
I'll post pics when I get started. Sounds like I'll be shopping for a backup guitar on e - b a y or craigslist.

Dec 25th update: Just bought a backup guitar (I'm a student on this forum ). Will start work on the Takamine as soon as it arrives (probably first week of January ).
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

soltirefa
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by soltirefa » Fri Dec 29, 2017 3:05 am

Useful information:

Japanese-built Takamine Pro Series guitars can be reliably dated from the eight-digit serial numbers typically found at the neck block inside the instruments. The first two digits designate the year of manufacture, followed by two digits denoting the month.

Tom Wimsatt
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:39 pm

I have a question regarding compensated saddle placement. A writeup I found recommended compensation (installing the saddle at precisely twice the distance from nut to 12th fret is incorrect, you need to add a little for the guitar to play in tune).

I bought a "compensated " bone saddle replacement (along with a new bridge ). Does this mean that the compensation described above isn't necessary?
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

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ameriken
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Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by ameriken » Sat Jan 06, 2018 4:18 pm

Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:39 pm
I have a question regarding compensated saddle placement. A writeup I found recommended compensation (installing the saddle at precisely twice the distance from nut to 12th fret is incorrect, you need to add a little for the guitar to play in tune).

I bought a "compensated " bone saddle replacement (along with a new bridge ). Does this mean that the compensation described above isn't necessary?
I've been reading about this too and the way I understand it is a properly built guitar should already be built to that 'twice the distance' spec. Even with that, the G string can still have poor intonation. The compensated saddle extends the length of the G string to compensate for that intonation. I too just ordered a compensated saddle (Philippe Bosset). There are some saddles that also compensate for the B and D strings. Unless your guitar wasn't originally built properly, I don't think there is any need to move it. That's my understanding at least.
Amalio Burguet 1A Spruce
Takamine C-132S

Tom Wimsatt
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Posts: 222
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Location: Northern Alabama

Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:31 pm

ameriken wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 4:18 pm
Tom Wimsatt wrote:
Sat Jan 06, 2018 3:39 pm
I have a question regarding compensated saddle placement. A writeup I found recommended compensation (installing the saddle at precisely twice the distance from nut to 12th fret is incorrect, you need to add a little for the guitar to play in tune).

I bought a "compensated " bone saddle replacement (along with a new bridge ). Does this mean that the compensation described above isn't necessary?
I've been reading about this too and the way I understand it is a properly built guitar should already be built to that 'twice the distance' spec. Even with that, the G string can still have poor intonation. The compensated saddle extends the length of the G string to compensate for that intonation. I too just ordered a compensated saddle (Philippe Bosset). There are some saddles that also compensate for the B and D strings. Unless your guitar wasn't originally built properly, I don't think there is any need to move it. That's my understanding at least.
Thanks for responding. I was inclined to think the same thing (mount the new bridge in same/twice the distance position).

Incidentally, the original saddle had the G-string compensation you described. The replacement has the added B & D compensation. I'll mount the bridge at the 650 mm scale position and post the result (of the intonation check).
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

Tom Wimsatt
Student of the online lessons
Posts: 222
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2017 10:51 pm
Location: Northern Alabama

Re: Takamine C132S plug

Post by Tom Wimsatt » Sat Jan 06, 2018 5:39 pm

I decided to do an intonation check to get a ballpark estimate of bridge & saddle position. Using the old bridge and C-clamps I temporarily mounted it and strung up the D and treble E strings. Tuned them up (scary by the way ), slid in the new bridge assy. The result confirmed that the original/twice-the-distance position is the way to go.
1989 Takamine C132S
1979 Yamaha CG-100A

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