D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

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Jean-François Delcamp
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D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Sep 10, 2013 3:48 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D01.

I'm going to talk to you about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, and about the classical position for holding the guitar.

Timetable for the beginner:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary when you are a beginner:
3 days when you can devote 10 minutes to repeating each difficult passage from 6 to 12 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 30 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 10 minutes practising the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases (indicated by phrase marks) several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 5 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 2 hours in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 10 and 30 minutes:
Monday 30 minutes
Tuesday 10 minutes
Wednesday 30 minutes
Thursday 10 minutes
Friday 30 minutes
Saturday 10 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.

Some classical guitarists adopt a position similar to that used by cellists. I am not competent to teach you that position, but it is worth being aware of.



We will study some techniques and some exercises.
D01, page 6 and page 7:
- The rest stoke technique (apoyando). Apoyando is a way to vibrate the string by a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to come to rest on the adjacent string.
- The technique of alternating the index and middle fingers of the hand that makes the strings vibrate. To stabilize the hand and fully benefit from this exercise, it is necessary to place the tip of the thumb on the fifth string (A string).
- The tempo. To measure yourself the time, you count the time aloud, as indicated in the score.


The rest stoke technique (apoyando)

Tirando

MI SI SOL RE

Page 6 number 1

Page 6 number 2

Page 7 SOL LA SI DO

Page 7 number 1

Page 7 number 2

Page 7 number 3





To complete this lesson we will try four simple studies, D01, page 8 to page 10,
A la claire fontaine
Old Mac Donald
Au clair de la lune
Il est minuit
SOL LA SI RE

A la claire fontaine


RE MI SOL LA SI

Old Mac Donald


RE MI FA# SOL LA SI SI

Au clair de la lune

Il est minuit



I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) : CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Anonyme : Old Mac Donald
Anonyme : Il est minuit




Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Teodora Despotovic Kosanovic
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

D. Michael McIntyre
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

Halil Akaydin
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Apip Kamil
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Ben Spurr
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)first part
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)second part
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Juan Silva
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

David Lavallee
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Nimit Kamdar
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

CasperVanKerschaver
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Theresa S. Sedlock
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Antonio Carneiro
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Bill Davis
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Barbara DiNenno
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Monica Spurr
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

Edna Lopez
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Pat Ross
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Harry Wagg
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

RogerMoore
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Archit Junnarkar
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Erik Baselier
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Loo Kin Xing
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Scott Fountain
Old Mac Donald

John Tompkins
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)

Ray Santos
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Brian Hunker
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Pyit Phyo Aung
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Eddy Sung
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Shelby Brown
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Paola Mendez
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit

Paul Shepley
CORDES A VIDE - OPEN STRING (page 6)
Old Mac Donald
Il est minuit
:( + ♫ = :)

Bartosz Robakowski

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Bartosz Robakowski » Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:05 pm

Hi Jean-François!

I have couple questions for you or anyone who can answer them:

1) Can you specify what do you mean by passage? Let's look on first boxed passage on page 6. I think that in order to practise it, we must play half note E, then at the same time damp this note and play full note B.

2) Is there any difference between two notes connected by line (i.e. on top of page 8 ) and two normal notes?

3) What does strange symbol from page 9 mean? (the one with small arch above dot above 4e on 3rd line to the right)

4) Let's look on SOL LA SI DO on 6th page. Could you tell me what do numbers above the notes mean? Are they indicators for which fret I should press the given string, or maybe it means I should press fret with my 2nd finger on left hand(Index or middle finger)?

I'm sorry for any inconvenience!

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Marko Räsänen
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marko Räsänen » Tue Sep 10, 2013 6:08 pm

Hi Bartosz,

1) Yes, you are correct. It usually makes sense to include a few notes or a measure before the boxed section. Usually the passages include more than one note. In this case the idea of a boxed section is to practice damping the 'e' note at the same time as playing the 'b' note.

2) Those lines indicate phrases, i.e. musical ideas. You may for example let the last note of the phrase ring slightly longer than its marked duration, or add a slight pause after it, when appropriate, but you don't have to. Phrases could be compared to sentences in language where you may take a breath in-between reading them out loud to make the language more understandable for the listener.

3) That symbol is called 'fermata'. It means to linger on that note slightly longer than the marked duration, i.e. the time slows down during fermata.

4) They indicate the left hand finger. '1' for index, '2' for middle, '3' for ring and '4' for little finger. '0' indicates an open string, i.e. no left hand finger used for fretting the string.

Marko
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Bartosz Robakowski

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Bartosz Robakowski » Tue Sep 10, 2013 6:31 pm

Marko Räsänen wrote:Hi Bartosz,

1) Yes, you are correct. It usually makes sense to include a few notes or a measure before the boxed section. Usually the passages include more than one note. In this case the idea of a boxed section is to practice damping the 'e' note at the same time as playing the 'b' note.

2) Those lines indicate phrases, i.e. musical ideas. You may for example let the last note of the phrase ring slightly longer than its marked duration, or add a slight pause after it, when appropriate, but you don't have to. Phrases could be compared to sentences in language where you may take a breath in-between reading them out loud to make the language more understandable for the listener.

3) That symbol is called 'fermata'. It means to linger on that note slightly longer than the marked duration, i.e. the time slows down during fermata.

4) They indicate the left hand finger. '1' for index, '2' for middle, '3' for ring and '4' for little finger. '0' indicates an open string, i.e. no left hand finger used for fretting the string.

Marko
Thanks a lot, Marco! :merci:

Halil Akaydin
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Halil Akaydin » Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:45 pm

I have a question about the flower-like symbol that tells us to damp the preceding note. On page 4 of D01 in the second example, which is in 2/4 time, we are asked to damp the open E string with our 'P' finger while playing the open A string. Is the open A supposed to be played with the 'i' finger as a free stroke? Otherwise how do we damp the open E string while playing the open A string both with our thumb? Maybe I'm overlooking something.

Looking through D01 a month or so ago I found similar passages and didn't know what to do. Can anyone offer some help? :)

Tarbaby (1953 - 2016)

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Tarbaby (1953 - 2016) » Tue Sep 10, 2013 9:55 pm

Hi Halil,

The open "A" is played with the thumb, but you need to touch the E string with the side of the thumb at the same moment that you pluck the A. (You can touch it a fraction of a second before you pluck, if that's easier). :wink:

I guess you are aware that your 2nd finger will be damping the previous open b string at the same time. It's a bit tricky, but will come naturally in time. :)

Alan

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LindaWoodford
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by LindaWoodford » Wed Sep 11, 2013 7:57 am

Hi Halil,
I'm not such an experienced player as Alan, and with this technique, I often end up catching the flat surface of my thumbnail on the E string, which results in a buzz, so I use an alternative method. After playing the A, I lift the thumb over and back to rest on the E. It gives the base line a smoother sound (more legato), and prepares my thumb for playing the E, in case this comes next. (There are many pieces where open A and E alternate.)
When the notes are played the other way around, I just rest my thumb on the A during the follow-through after playing E.
Hope that helps, Linda

Halil Akaydin
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Halil Akaydin » Wed Sep 11, 2013 8:47 am

Alan, Thanks for clearing that up. I was hoping your explanation of the damping wasn't how it's done. It's difficult :). Linda, thanks for the suggestion, I'll work on both techniques and see how it goes.

D. Michael McIntyre

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by D. Michael McIntyre » Wed Sep 11, 2013 10:25 pm

Are there any particular requirements to satisfy in making the recordings? The only one I've found so far is that I commit to make them, but the rest appears to be open to interpretation.

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GeoffB
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by GeoffB » Wed Sep 11, 2013 10:33 pm

The main purpose of posting the recordings is to get feedback from the other students, so from that point of view a video is more useful than an audio file, and it's useful if both hands can be seen, so that problems with technique can be spotted and pointed out. Apart from that, making a recording is a useful way of motivating yourself, especially if you can post an improved version at the end of the month. And it's good practice for the exam recording, if you choose to do that.

Geoff
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Juan Silva

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Juan Silva » Thu Sep 12, 2013 2:00 am

grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. Gotta say, damping is proving to be challenge when left hand wants to dampen the string that is being played.

Apip Kamil

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Apip Kamil » Thu Sep 12, 2013 4:02 am

I am a beginner and everything here is very challenging for me :lol: . I feel apoyando technique, helps me a lot familiarising my ear with the sound of the notes. It is good for me.

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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by GeoffB » Thu Sep 12, 2013 11:55 am

LindaWoodford wrote:Hi Halil,
I'm not such an experienced player as Alan, and with this technique, I often end up catching the flat surface of my thumbnail on the E string, which results in a buzz, so I use an alternative method. After playing the A, I lift the thumb over and back to rest on the E. It gives the base line a smoother sound (more legato), and prepares my thumb for playing the E, in case this comes next. (There are many pieces where open A and E alternate.)
When the notes are played the other way around, I just rest my thumb on the A during the follow-through after playing E.
Hope that helps, Linda
That's how I was taught too, and M. Delcamp uses this method where appropriate (there is often more than one way to damp a string). There's an good example in last year's lesson 7 here. Scroll down to the ninth video, "Anonyme : Quand j'étais chez mon père", and watch his thumb when he plays the bass notes. When he plays the open A, the thumb immediately goes back to damp the preceding E on the 6th string. And when he plays the E, the thumb naturally comes to rest on the 5th string, damping the previous A. Each time the thumb is in the right position for the next note, and the very slight delay before damping the E does give a more legato sound than damping it early.
Juan Silva wrote:grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. Gotta say, damping is proving to be challenge when left hand wants to dampen the string that is being played.
It does take a while to get used to playing some strings and damping others, but don't despair, it will come eventually!

Geoff
Classical Guitar Forum.

"Experience is something you don't get until just after you need it." - Steven Wright

D. Michael McIntyre

Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by D. Michael McIntyre » Thu Sep 12, 2013 1:13 pm

This is going at an impressively plodding and painful pace. I spent more than an hour on 6-1 and 6-2, and I'm nowhere close to having them right yet. I'm forcing myself to keep working on every detail that I am aware of until I finally get it right. Patience and dedication in the beginning will pay off in the long run, I keep telling myself every time I screw up and have to do the passage over and over and over again.

My biggest problem is plucking with the correct finger.

My next biggest problem is trying to translate all of this onto a tablature staff mentally somehow or other, so the difference between E and B, having a line between it, tempts me to play E and G, skipping a string.

A more minor problem is the way he draws that glissando line to a pedal up symbol. My brain chokes on this. Slide to a what? Pedal up? What pedal?

I'll get there. This is fun! And incredibly crazy. Reading standard notation on a guitar? Who does that?

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GeoffB
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Re: D01 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by GeoffB » Thu Sep 12, 2013 4:01 pm

Who does that? Most classical guitarists, that's who. :wink: It's a challenge at first, but once you're more familiar with playing from standard notation you'll find it very useful. It opens up a vast amount of music to you (not only guitar music), and you'll be able to visualize the tune more easily than with tab. I'm glad you're enjoying it.

As for the diagonal lines, admittedly they do look like glissando markings, but in this case they just indicate which note is to be damped, and when.

Geoff
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