D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Archive of on-line classical guitar lessons from previous years.
Forum rules
The classical guitar lessons are free. They are aimed at the isolated amateur who does not have access to a teacher. To join the class, apply for registration into the students group.

PDF, MP3, Vidéos, Lessons : Level D01 - Level D02 - Level D03 - Level D04 - Level D05 - Level D06 - Level D07 - Level D08 - Level D09 - Level D10 - Level D11 - Level D12.
User avatar
Jean-François Delcamp
Administrator
Administrator
Posts: 4530
Joined: Sun May 30, 2004 7:49 pm
Location: Brest, France

D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Jean-François Delcamp » Tue Sep 10, 2013 4:00 pm

Hello everyone,
Please start by downloading the latest version of volume D03.

We are going to talk about the minimum time you need to devote to the study of the guitar, about the position for holding the guitar, and finally about some techniques, exercises and pieces.



The schedule of a student in the third year:
In order to progress, you need a little time each day for 6 days of the week. Here is the minimum necessary for players of this level :
3 days when you can devote 15 minutes to repeating each difficult passage 6 to 12 times. I'll indicate these difficult passages to you by putting a box (a rectangular border) around them.
and
3 days when you can devote 40 minutes to studying the guitar, made up of
- 15 minutes practicing the difficult (boxed) passages,
- 15 minutes repeating the individual phrases several times in succession (3 to 6 times)
- and finally 10 minutes playing the piece or pieces in full.

Note that you must play for 6 days of the week. If you combine all this time into one day, that is to say, 2 hours 45 minutes in a single day, you will not make progress and furthermore you will risk injuring yourself by making demands on certain muscles for too long. Divide up your practice and play a little each day.

Spend most of your practice time on the parts you have trouble playing: difficult passages, difficult phrases. Only play pieces the whole way through once or twice a week.
So we understand one another properly, here is an example of a timetable where sessions alternate between 15 and 40 minutes:
Monday 40 minutes
Tuesday 15 minutes
Wednesday 40 minutes
Thursday 15 minutes
Friday 40 minutes
Saturday 15 minutes



The position for the classical guitar is the product of past experience. The classical position enables us to reduce effort to a minimum, and has arisen from a compromise between the needs for stability, comfort and the efficient use of both hands.

The principles of this position are:
sitting position, back straight, shoulders level,
the guitar rests on whichever thigh is on the neck side.
We raise the head of the guitar level with our head, with the aid of a footstool or of a support placed on the thigh.
The hand which plays the strings is placed over the sound hole, the elbow rests on the edge of the body of the guitar, level with the bridge.
The arm on the neck side is bent to bring the hand up to the height of the shoulder, the thumb is placed behind the neck, beneath the second fret and behind the third string, the fingers are over the strings.
Try to achieve relaxation, from the shoulders right down to the hands.
Finally, choose a chair of a height that allows your thigh to be horizontal, so that your guitar will be supported in a
stable manner. If your thigh is angled in one direction or the other, your guitar will slip and interfere with your playing.



To begin the course we will firstly look at, or relook at, pages 26 and 58 of volume D01.
- page 26 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 58 of volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) REST STROKE - APOYANDO
These exercises will work upon the technique of simultaneous rest strokes (apoyando) with the thumb and index finger, and also with the thumb and middle finger.
The rest stroke is a way to play the string with a finger movement which plucks the string and then continues to move until it comes to rest on the adjacent string. Working on this technique will allow you to discover the best position for your plucking hand (the right hand if you are right-handed).
If you are already used to plucking the strings with free strokes, the simultaneous rest strokes with the thumb and a finger will seem difficult to you, even impossible. But be assured, with patience and perseverence, this difficulty will be resolved in 30 minutes. I know from experience that the first tries are truly discouraging, particularly for adults. It is for this reason that I wish to reassure you in advance, take heart, you will be able to do it.

D01 p26 n1 - Delcamp Polyphonie - Apoyando


D01 p26 n2 - Delcamp Polyphonie - Apoyando


D01 p58 n15 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke


D01 p58 n16 Buté - Apoyando - Rest stroke




Once done, we will continue studying an exercise and 4 pieces, among the simplest in the volume D03.

- Page 86 Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) STRING DAMPING
These techniques are essential in polyphonic playing. Guitar playing is unique in that we must stop the resonances, in particular those of the open strings. Without these string damping techniques, polyphony is blurred by dissonance.

D03 p86 n1 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n2 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n3 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n4 - STRING DAMPING


D03 p86 n5 - STRING DAMPING




- Page 8 Giorgio MAINERIO (1535-1582) SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA
This piece is a passemeze that uses two chords, those of A minor and G major. GWIN AR C'HALLAOUED in volume D03 is based on the same chords. Also in volume D03, BRIAN BORU'S MARCH is similarly based on these two chords.
The bass accompaniment is so simple and functional that I recommend it as a model for anyone who wants to begin working on improvisation.
To start work on improvisation, play the following bass part :
| A E | A E | A E | A E | G D | A E | G D | A E |
and use your free fingers to improvise over a melody over it.
First improvise a melody over the bass made up of whole notes (semibreves). When you've mastered the improvisation of a melody composed of whole notes, start using quarter notes (crotchets), which is more difficult. Finally improvise over the bass a melody made up of whole notes, quarter notes and eighth notes (quavers). We will not go any further in this third year course.

D03 p8 Giorgio MAINERIO - Schiarazula marazula


D03 p8 Improvisation 1 - Passemeze


D03 p8 Improvisation 2 - Passemeze


D03 p8 Improvisation 3 - Passemeze




- Page 9 Guillaume MORLAYE (1510?-1558?) GAILLARDE
Here William Morlaye constantly plays on the ambivalence in the pattern of accented beats. The rhythm is based at the same time on two measures in 3/8 time (ie 2 strong beats for a total of 6 eighth notes) and also on one long measure in 3/4 time (ie 3 strong beats for a total of 6 eighth notes). This practice, already common in the Renaissance, has been in constant use by composers right up to our own time. These changes in the rhythm are called hemiola. A hemiola refers to the insertion of a triple rhythm into a duple rhythm, or vice versa.

D03 p9 Guillaume MORLAYE - Gaillarde




- Page 45 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ARPEGGI
Two simple pieces, perfect for an introduction to arpeggios. In these arpeggios, only your fingers move, be sure to keep your right hand in the same position.

D03 p45 Ferdinand CARULLI - Arpeggi di 3 note


D03 p45 Ferdinand CARULLI - Arpeggi di 4 note




- page 63 Mattéo CARCASSI (1792-1853) ANDANTINO opus 59
This andantino is a small masterpiece of brevity. For my part, I damp the resonance of the bass strings and I suggest you do the same. To damp the resonances, I rest my thumb on the string when I play with the index finger and I rest my index finger on the string when I play with the thumb, as in this video example.

D03 p63 exercice andantino


D03 p63 Mattéo CARCASSI -andantino opus 59




I ask you first to work on all these exercises and pieces for one week and then to post your recordings on the forum for:
- page 26 du volume D01 : Jean-François DELCAMP (1956) POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
- page 45 Ferdinand CARULLI (1770-1841) ARPEGGI
- page 8 Giorgio MAINERIO (1535-1582) SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA



Good luck!


I thank Geoff (GeoffB) who has helped in the translation of my lessons into English.


Jean-François

---

Exam qualifying submissions:

POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Catherine Livingston
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Pentti Kotilainen
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

EmmanuelVankerschaver
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Win Chaivipas
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Håvard.Bergene
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

WilliamTee
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Mike Modjeski
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Satyajit Kadle
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Marian Kmet
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Ashley Shen
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA

Dave Konings
POLYPHONIE - Apoyando
ARPEGGI
SCHIARAZULA MARAZULA
:( + ♫ = :)

Livia Tjahjadi

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Livia Tjahjadi » Tue Sep 10, 2013 5:22 pm

Finally, after the long wait.. I will work hard for the lesson. :merci: Mr. Delcamp!

Livia Tjahjadi

Adam S. Vernon

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Adam S. Vernon » Sat Sep 14, 2013 2:44 am

I love Schiarazula Marazula. Great little piece.

Mike Modjeski

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Modjeski » Sat Sep 14, 2013 10:11 pm

Hello all, just a quick introduction of myself.
My name is Mike Modjeski. I am from the state of Missouri in the US.

I have completed D02. I started on D03 last year but because of overwhelming work obligations was unable to complete it. I hope to be able to keep up this year.

Look forward to learning with you all.

Catherine Livingston

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Catherine Livingston » Sun Sep 15, 2013 1:32 pm

Hello Mike, Adam and Liva. It's so nice to meet you! I live in Southern California near Palm Springs. I took classical guitar lessons in college for several years and have recently begun to practice again. I was so happy to find this classical guitar forum while searching for sheet music in August. This will
be my first class through this forum. I will be traveling this week so I will try to record myself and post them today for feedback. Do they want us to post recordings at the end of the week and then again at the end of the month, or just once?

:roll:

Cat Livingston

Mike Modjeski

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Mike Modjeski » Sun Sep 15, 2013 2:10 pm

Hi Cat, I spent a year out that way. I have fond memories of Palm Springs.
The idea of the recordings is to post your progress after one week of practice so that the others can offer feedback. If later you feel you've improved you can post another and show off :wink:

Catherine Livingston

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Catherine Livingston » Tue Sep 17, 2013 4:45 am

Here are my recordings after 1 week. This is the first time I have posted recordings on this forum. I'm learning to use my recording equipment. I think it will be easier next time. Thanks so much for any suggestions or tips.
:wink:


Cat Livingston
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
Marko Räsänen
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3786
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 11:56 am
Location: Finland

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marko Räsänen » Tue Sep 17, 2013 5:56 am

Well done, Cat!

That sounded very good. I've got just a couple of comments. In Schiarazula Marazula, please pay attention to the damping of the bass notes as indicated in the sheet music. If you aren't used to doing that, it will feel very difficult at first (at least that was the case for me a couple of years ago), but will soon become a second nature, and is well worth learning, because the harmonies will get much clearer.

My second comment is that there was quite a bit buzzing with the bass strings, but without a video I am not sure that is caused by fretting the string too far away from the frets, or string action being too low, or even some resonance with your microphone?

Keep up the good work!

Marko
Alhambra 4P spruce
Almansa 457 cedar
Cordoba C12 spruce

User avatar
Goran Penic
Posts: 713
Joined: Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:36 pm
Location: Zagreb, Croatia

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Goran Penic » Tue Sep 17, 2013 7:01 am

:bravo: Catherine. Very good performance.
I agree with Marko. It is very important to master string damping and Schiarazula Marazula is an excellent exercise for it.
:bye:
Guitar: Mirko Hotko 1989
Strings: D'Addario EJ46TT Pro Arte Dynacore Hard Tension
Recorder: Olympus LS-20M

Pentti Kotilainen

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Pentti Kotilainen » Tue Sep 17, 2013 10:14 am

:bravo: Cat,
excellent job! It's nice to have you here with us.

One week has already gone :shock: , so here are my submissions for this lesson.

During the last week I wasn't playing so much, but last year I did follow DO3 together with DO2 and D01. I made 7 of the DO3 lessons then, but did not send them here. I'm sure, that I played these pieces much better then than what I'm presenting now. :oops: This year I'll try to follow also DO4 when/if time permits.

G. Mainerio Schiarazula Marazula
[media]https://youtu.be/3EmlB3BckGo[/media]
F.Carulli Arpeggi di tre note
[media]https://youtu.be/S6YTVMjBkP8[/media]
F. Carulli Arpeggi di quatro not
[media]https://youtu.be/VQ_IVIoRkps[/media]
J-F Delcamp Polyphony 1 Rest stoke - apoyando
[media]https://youtu.be/7FxZJL-G22o[/media]
J-F Delcamp Polyphony 2 Rest stroke - apoyando
[media]https://youtu.be/ZjXEV2QP95c[/media]

Thanks for listening :bye:

User avatar
Marko Räsänen
Moderator
Moderator
Posts: 3786
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2012 11:56 am
Location: Finland

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Marko Räsänen » Tue Sep 17, 2013 6:12 pm

Well played Pentti! You had some trouble with Schiarazula 1/16th notes where you had to slow down slightly. Perhaps you could look into the right hand fingering of those problem spots. When I did this lesson I wrote the whole RH fingering over the sheet in a way that made most sense to me (back then at least) avoiding awkward string crossings. My 'a' finger was quite weak back then, so it was a bit difficult in the beginning, but I persevered, and in the end was pleased with the result.
Alhambra 4P spruce
Almansa 457 cedar
Cordoba C12 spruce

Pentti Kotilainen

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Pentti Kotilainen » Tue Sep 17, 2013 8:05 pm

Thanks Marko,
for your kind comments and valuable advice!

Regarding Schiarazula I have already written down all the fingerings into my sheet music. So, that is not the problem. I have used the fingerings which professor Delcamp has given in the first measures and those which Goran has provided for us earlier (they can certainly be found from the lesson archive) together with my own ideas.

This was my first recording session for the season and Schiarazula was my first piece there. This explains some of the hesitation that was present in my playing. Hope that in the following submissions I can stay more relaxed.
:merci:
Pentti

User avatar
LindaWoodford
Posts: 380
Joined: Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:47 am
Location: Switzerland

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by LindaWoodford » Wed Sep 18, 2013 8:56 am

:bravo: Pentti, that's a great start. :okok:
It's good to see you in the lessons again.

Pentti Kotilainen

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Pentti Kotilainen » Thu Sep 19, 2013 8:34 am

Hi Linda!

Thanks for your encouragement.
Yes, it's good to see you in the lessons too. :D

I saw your D04 videos. They were really brilliant :casque: :bravo: .
I'm still working on my D04 submissions. I've planned to record them next Tuesday (at least the required ones).

It's good to be back in business, isn't it!

:bye:

Tom Hayes

Re: D03 Classical guitar lesson 01

Post by Tom Hayes » Thu Sep 19, 2013 6:21 pm

I'm thinking of participating in D03 this year as well, but I'm a bit confused over the technique and rules of when and where to use the i, m and a fingers. Is it a case of using m and a on the high E string and alternating between i, m and a on the others, or is it just a case of experimenting and finding the best method yourself? I'm just a bit unsure if there are any firm rules on which fingers to use on which strings. I spent 15 minutes practicing the first few bars of Marazula tonight and I must say I'm enjoying the challenge so far, but would ideally like to use it with the best fingerings so any help would be great :)

Return to “Classical guitar lessons archive”