Lute plans

Discussion of all aspects of early instruments, lutes, theorbos, vihuelas, Renaissance guitars and Baroque guitars.
lil miss picky

Lute plans

Post by lil miss picky » Mon Feb 21, 2005 12:28 pm

Does anybody know of a site that offers a free working drawing of a lute? I have a very old and increasingly battered drawing of a baroque lute, which I am working to copy but I would rather spend my available time on construction projects, and have no disposable(?) income with which to buy a new plan.

Buckley

Post by Buckley » Mon Feb 28, 2005 6:59 pm

If you go to http://www.luth.org/plans/bp.htm#lutes there are some picutres. Also, if you have a good library or any library nearby that can order books via interlibrary loan, check out Historical Lute Construction by Robert Lundberg. There are some drawings in there as well.

-John.

kreso

Post by kreso » Thu Jul 28, 2005 12:25 pm

Hello, Myscha!

I read your post and I happily remeber my own exprience 2 years ago. i didn't have any experience in instrument building but I decided to make a lute. I didn't have any original plans but I reconstructed measurements from pictures and descriptions which you can find on the Internet. The whole summer I enjoyed in making mould, body, neck and pegbox. That was a really nice experience but I stopped on the soundboard and pegs because I had problems in finding material and money. I succeeded in making a nice body but I think that I'll never finish it. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the experience very much which I wish to you too.
If you have any specific questions, you're welcome.
:D

Azalais

Post by Azalais » Sat Oct 01, 2005 7:35 pm

Myscha, why not make cardboard or paper patterns from your drawing before it falls apart? For less than cost of "printing" a "free" file, you could get a sheet of mylar or vellum at an art supply place and trace a copy of your drawing.

lil miss picky

Preserving an old drawing

Post by lil miss picky » Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:14 pm

Thanks for the suggestion. That might be the most practical way to proceed in the short term (and, given the volatile nature of technological advancement, the long term also!)

Return to “Lutes, Baroque and Renaissance Guitars, etc.”